Philosophical Arguments Aganst God

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SARTRE AND DENNETT ARGUMENTS AGAINST GOD
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Sartre arguments
In the first phase, the philosophical career of Jean Paul Sartre lays emphasis on the construction of a philosophy of existence known as existentialism. Existentialism considers human nature condition as a critical philosophical problem and in which this problem can be shared through ontology (Douglas, & George, 2003). Sartre’s philosophy is explained through his ontology in which he defines two types of reality, which lie beyond our conscious experience: the being of the object of consciousness and that of consciousness itself. He argued that the object of consciousness exists in a non-rational and independent way as in-itself while consciousness is the consciousness of something concerning something else, and it is nigh possible to understand it within one's conscious experience: it exists as "for-itself." A fundamental feature of consciousness is its negative power that human experience nothing less and in which this power is also at work on the self (Douglas, & George, 2003).
According to Sartre Jean-Paul (2003), God does not exist and does not exist neither on logical or rational grounds. Be it one believes His existence or not largely depends on the strength of his argument. Many scholars and philosophers commonly feel that Sartre Jean-Paul existentialism is an irrational counterpoint to the enlightenment. Sartre Jean-Paul, at least, gave reasons for his conclusions. He argued that everything happened as if the world, human, and human in the world realized only a missing God. He further claimed that everything happens for-itself, which is the consciousness or a person, and in-itself, which refers to the world, in which both were present in disintegration state with an ideal phenomenon (Sartre 2003). He also notes that disintegration has never taken place but because it…...

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