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Philosophy-Religion

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Does God exist? If so, why is there evil?
Like St. Augustine, I do acknowledge that ``God exists”. In order to explain his ideology, Augustine refers to the life of a tree, rock, dog and human beings. He argues that among the things aforementioned, only human being posses the ability to think and act thus meaning that among the creations on earth, the human being is the intelligent creature. Further, he expounds his argument by stating that if another being is intelligently superior to human beings, then it has to be God.
However, St. Augustine acknowledges the presence of evil. St. Augustine’s opinion of sin is linked to the freedom to exercise ``freewill” by individuals an aspect that results to ``moral evil”. Free will forms the basis by Augustine that God should not be blamed for ``the existence” of sin. To expound on his argument, Augustine informs his readers that he like many other people has been subject to sin due to his desire to realize what sin entails and urges the people not to dwell so much on sin rather than the existence of God(pg,164).
In conclusion, I support Augustine’s argument that no one can understand the thinking of God thus we should focus on his goodness rather than sin existence.

Are Human Beings Selfish?
I believe that every ``human being” is selfish. The selfish nature of human beings is evident from the daily activities that we engage in during our lifetime and routines. In the current society, it is common for politicians to make laws that increase their ability to succeed as leaders rather than focusing on laws that will result to the ``well being” of the society. The aforementioned opinion is acknowledged by Freud, the philosopher. Freud states that each person has a desire to satisfy his needs at the expense of others. Further, Freud illustrates that individuals are usually willing to undertake whatever it takes to satisfy their `` personal needs” even such acts entail inflicting harm to other people. It is a common occurrence for people and countries to engage in battles to facilitate a fulfillment of interests.
Freud argues that the selfish nature of ``human beings” is attributed to the ``human nature”. Human nature facilitates our thinking as human beings in regard to how we perceive other people and react to situations thus enhancing the transmission of the ``selfish nature”. In conclusion, I concur with Freud’s view that the selfish nature of ``human beings’ is real and that we should learn to live with it (pg, 91).
How can we be happy?
The issue on how to be happy is an issue that many people would like to talk about. The desire for happiness is attributed to the fact that across the world, we find that many people despite the fact that some maybe wealthy, they are still unhappy. It is obvious that people usually measure happiness by the amount of luxury and properties that they have acquired.
Epicurus shares the same opinion whereby he is of the view that people measure their happiness by the wealth they posses. Epicurus therefore, argues that wealth makes the life of its owner complicated thus resulting to an increase in worries thus inhibiting an individual a chance to experience real happiness. Epicurus therefore, states that people should live simple lives if they want to experience happiness.
Additionally, Epicurus urges people to think positively to enhance clearing worries and fears that result to pain and suffering. Further, Epicurus argues that every individual seeks pleasure in order to avoid pain and seek happiness, but they forget that the pleasures will last for a short time thus the happiness is temporary thus it is our responsibility to ensure that we are always happy(pg,7).
To conclude, I concur with Epicurus that we should be satisfied with what we have in order to be happy. Worrying about what we want to have will only increase our worries thus denying ourselves the chance to be happy.
Explain Aristotle's Nichomachean Ethics.
Nichomachean Ethics by Aristotle is about ``human morality and happiness” and how it can be achieved by Humans. Aristotle is of the opinion that every human should be happy an opinion that I relate to. However, in order to be happy, Aristotle argues that a man should practice virtues that encourage the achievement of happiness. Aristotle urges people to engage in virtues that reduce pain and encourage happiness to all people.Further, Aristotle argues that individuals should be proud of positive acts that are ``socially acceptable”.
Moreover, Aristotle acknowledges that a morality is difficult to explain but urges his readers to engage in activities that facilitate happiness. In my opinion, Aristotle was very right in encouraging people to apply reason in their thinking especially in politics. We find that the societies we live in are affected greatly by politics in terms of development. A proper`` political society” in my opinion would help in enhancing the achievement of happiness and (justice” in a society as described by Nichomachean ethics (pg, 70).

Works Cited
Aristotle .The Nichomachean Ethics. USA: Start Publishing LLLC, 2013.Press.
Geis Robert. On The Existence of God. USA: University Press of America, 2009.Print.
Green Paula & Staub Silvia. Psychology and Social Responsibility: Facing
Global Challenges.USA: NYU Press, 1991. Print.
Inwood Brad &Gerson Lloyd. The Epicurus Reader. USA: Hackett Publishing, 1994.Print.

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