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2D motion Worksheets
Section 1 (2D Motion Non-Projectiles) 1. Find the westward component of a resultant vector 85.42 unit, 23º W of N.

2. What is the east component of a vector 12.3 m 10.0 º N of E?

3. Calculate the N component of a resultant 32.5 m/s, 35.0 º E of N.

4. You move 26m at an angle of 40.0º W of S. (a) How far south of your starting point are you? (b) How far west are you?

5. Find the resultant of 55.4 units, W and 69.2 units S?

6. What is the resultant of 1,230 m/s, S and 1,450 m/s, N?

7. If you walk 6.00 m, N and 5.00 m E, what is your final location from your start? (magnitude, angle, and direction)

8. Combine 27 mi/h, E and 73 mi/h, N.

9. A river flows at a speed of 12 m/s from north to south. A powerboat can move at a constant maximum speed of 23 m/s in still water. a. What is the maximum velocity of the boat upstream (against the current)?

b. What is the maximum velocity of the boat downstream?

c. If the boat were headed east across the river at its maximum speed, what would the resultant velocity of the boat be?

10. A plane is traveling toward the east with a velocity of 120 km/h. It encounters a wind blowing toward the east at 0.20 km/min. What is the velocity of the plane in km/h?

11. A girl walks 26 m at an angle of 39º W of S. a. How far west of her starting point is she?

b. How far south of her starting point is she?

12. A pitcher can throw a ball at a velocity of 125 km/h straight ahead. If he throws the ball straight when a cross-wind is blowing at 28 km/h to the left, a. What will the magnitude of the ball’s resultant velocity?

b. The direction of the ball will be off ________ º to the (left, right)

13. A plane heads due north, but because of a wind blowing to the west, the plane flies at a resultant velocity of 620 mi/h, 22º W of N. What was the velocity of the wind?

Section 2 Projectiles

1. A ball is kicked 8.0 m/s from a cliff 80m high. How far from the base of the cliff will the stone strike the ground?

2. If you launch a ball, moving horizontally at a speed of 1.12 m/s from a table that is 0.77 m tall, how far out from the table will the launched ball land?

3. A ball was kicked horizontally off a cliff at 15 m/s, how high was the cliff if the ball landed 83 m from the base of the cliff?

4. Josh throws a ball horizontally from the height of his head at 30 m/s. The ball lands 18 meters away, how tall was Josh.

5. A baseball rolls off a 1.20 m high desk and strikes the floor 0.50 m away from the base of the desk. How fast was it rolling?

6. A pelican flying drops a fish from a height of 8.1 m. The fish travels 9.3 m horizontally before it hits the ground. What was the pelican’s speed?

7. If you launch a ball horizontally, moving at a speed of 2.00 m/s from a table that is 1.5 m tall, how far from the base would it land?

When Vo is not 0

8. A football is kicked from ground level at a speed of 20 m/s at an angle of 42° above the ground. (resolve for the X and Y components of the vector)

a. How long does it take to hit the ground?

b. How far does it land from where it was kicked?

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