Free Essay

Pmp - 407 Project

In: Business and Management

Submitted By sadesai
Words 3691
Pages 15
Name of the Project: Highway 407 improvement

Executive summary

In 2013, following 3 years of program definition, research and planning, the province of Ontario’s ministry of transportation and infrastructure launched the project to improve the existing highway 407. This highway is the busiest route and convenient to access different parts of Toronto. The proposal of highway 407 was launched in 1959 and opened to the public in June 7 1997. 407 its one of the busiest highway, the total trips in 2010 was 114.691 Million. 407 ETR is the world’s first all-electronic toll road of its kind, and from the day it was opened up to the present day it continues to fulfill its mission of relieving traffic on local highways and roads.

The goal of the project “Highway 407 improvement” includes reducing congestion and travel time; improve safety; expanding networks and transportation choice for high occupancy vehicles. Given the cost of the project and other provincial priorities, a key objective was to be self-financing, paid for through ERT system. The present value cost is estimated more than $5 billion, which is calculated over the period of 35 years.

Key features of the project include extending the high occupancy vehicles lanes and commercial vehicle priority access. The project will also provide the reintroduction of the public transit to a corridor that has been too crowded to support reliable service for the past few years.

The request of proposal was submitted on June 6, 2013 and according to our estimate it will take 250 days to get approved, so by May 30, 2014 RFP will be approved. The following day we will start selection of preferred contractors and by our estimate it will take another 58 days to complete that procedure and we will finish this task on August 19, 2014. After that on the following day we start to negotiation and prepare the contract with contractor and by our forecast it will take 116 days. So, by January 28, 2015 we should be able to finalize the contract. On the following day we will select and agree the design which according to our forecast will take 13 days. So, by February 16, 2015 all the paper work we will done and our contractor Toronto development group’s design-builder will be to start the project the very next day.

The construction will start on February 17, 2015 and from our forecast it should finish by December 3, 2019 in total of 1251 days.

Purpose of this Project

In our project research, the purpose of this report is to demonstrate the need for the highway 407 improvements. It will be including the rationale, objectives and the processes required to complete the project. Our project explains how different procurement delivery models were examined and how project benefits and innovations are expected to be achieved in current market conditions. A summary of the key aspects of the final agreement is also provided. All of the agencies that are involved in this project are publicly responsible for regular budgeting, auditing and reporting processes. In all of its procurement processes, the Province is committed to a high standard of protecting all documents.

Selection Process

In this project, there was a two stage competitive selection process, attaining of a Request for Qualifications stage (RFQ) and a Request for Proposals (RFP) stage was used to choose a preferred contractor. Therefore, we approached 6 teams for RFQ, out of 6 teams only 3 responded and those teams were invited to participate in RFP. All this teams selected had local, national, and international experience in design, construction, operation, and maintenance, and financing of major transportation projects.

After the evaluation process, we based it on a design, build, finance, and operating procedure. As a result, we contacted Toronto development group as the preferred company to complete this project. A fair reviewer was then engaged to monitor the competitive selection process and came into conclusions that it was conducted impartially and fairly.

Due to the challenges, unexpected economic conditions, financial market stability during the final negotiations, the province and connect Toronto development group were unable to reach a mutual satisfactory agreement and negotiations were concluded. In relation with provisions regarding the RFP, the province then exercised its option to enter into a fixed-price, design-build agreement with Toronto development group’s design-builder for the design and construction of the improved highway 407. The
Province was able to integrate many of the advantages that had been recognized through designing, building, financing and operating procurement process. Design-Build Agreement

GTA drivers know they can expect a safe, fast and reliable commute when they choose Highway 407. 407 ETR has budgeted over $70 million in construction projects to keep the highway congestion free. * Under the design-build agreement, our project consist the following elements to improve the highway 407
Adding lanes between Highway 404 and Markham Road * Constructing extra lanes for high occupancy vehicles and commercial vehicle
Ramp improvements at QEW, including the QEW/Fairview Street interchange. * Widening the bridges between Highway 403 and 401 will allow the company to build additional lanes in each direction next year. This will increase traffic capacity by 50% in 2016 on this busy section of the highway.

1. Project Background, Rationale and Objectives

The Problem: Current Congestion
Significant population and economic growth joint with altering regional travel patterns and increasing trade have placed considerable strain on Toronto’s transportation system. Congestion on regional roads and highways is increasing with growing impacts to residents, communities, the environment and the economy.
Over the next 25 years, Greater Toronto’s population is expected to continue over the coming decades with the GTA becoming home to nearly 9.4 million people by 2041.

Without action, congestion would get worse, quality of life would suffer and economic opportunities would be inevitable. Investment in transportation is required to improve the region’s livability and its competitiveness as a trading center and a place to do business. Isolated employment growth, changing social trends and increasing trade have caused Metro Toronto’s growth to change differently than expected by prior regional planning documents such as the Livable Region Strategic Plan. As a result, the region’s transportation network has been showing increasing strain from significant changes in travel patterns, rising traffic volumes and congestion on major roads and bridges.

The GTA’s population is growing by one million people each decade, and in the next 30 years is expected to house one million more jobs, mostly in buildings that have not yet been built. But there is no coherent strategy for where and how new office space will be located, and already there is about 100 million square feet of office space that’s not connected to the region’s network of higher order transit, snarled highways and overcrowded trains are becoming more common.

In 1965 the area had about 22 million square feet of office space; today it has more than 200 million. Jobs and residents go hand-in-hand. As of September there were more than 150 condo towers under construction in the city, more than in the five largest U.S. cities combined.

This loss of mobility compromises the region’s ability to take advantage of significant economic development opportunities, negatively impacts the region’s competitiveness and reduces safety. Regional and inter-regional traffic would continue to spill onto local streets, adding to congested conditions already resulting in collision rates at least double that of free-flowing conditions, and congestion-related idling that contributes significantly to the region’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Responding to the Problem
Coordinated transportation infrastructure and service improvements are necessary throughout the region to address current and future transportation needs and to realize potential economic development opportunities from increasing trade.
In 2013, following three years of program definition, research and planning, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure launched a project which was a very important component of Toronto’s Strategy to reduce congestion.
Other highways for example, Highway 400 or 427 are facing significant commuter and goods movement problems. Therefore, citizens tend to use Highway 407 more than ever to travel between routes.

In response to this problem, as a group we came into conclusions that an improvement on Highway 407 is a necessity to reduce traffic and commute times.

Objectives: Highway 407 Corridor Pre-Design Concept
Studies were conducted using widely recognized tools and planning models along with the goals and analytical parameters established for the project to develop a pre-design concept for the Highway 407 corridor. This concept represented a conceptual point of reference for the physical scope of the Project. Various components of the Highway 407 corridor were studied, with each study indicating the need to provide significant improvements to accommodate forecasted traffic levels. These studies also strongly recommended addressing safety issues along the highway which included not enough combine lengths, wide off-ramp lines that back up onto the highway and undesirable lane changing at on- and off-ramps.

Project Goals
As a result of these studies, the following goals were established for the Highway 407 Improvement Project: * Reduce travel times for trips along the corridor and increase travel time predictability; * Reduce congestion at entry and exit points to Highway 407; * Reduce travel times for trips across the corridor and improve connections within and between communities; * Improve access to and exit from the corridor for goods movement; * Facilitate the introduction of transit service along the corridor and the improvement of transit service across the corridor

The pre-design concept for the Highway 407 Improvement Project included the following features:
• Added capacity to the Highway 407 corridor;
• Extending the westbound and eastbound lanes on Highway 407;
• Transit priority measures, including the introduction of bus service through transits and extended lanes

2. Project Benefits
User Benefits
Improving capacity and transit will provide significant road and bridge user benefits, primarily through:
• Travel time savings (avoiding delays);
• Reducing vehicle operating costs; and
• Improving safety.

Safety Benefits
The Project will also provide significant safety improvements along this major transportation corridor, including:
• Reducing congestion on Highway 407, particularly during peak periods, through widening the highway; extending lanes; providing transit and commercial vehicle priority access measures
• Providing safer, more efficient highway on- and off-ramps, improving connections and improving cross-highway movement; and
• Improving access for all modes of transportation, including public transit and commercial vehicles

Economic Benefits
The Project will also provide long-term economic benefits by:
• Improving the competitiveness of Canadian businesses moving goods to market through and within the region;
• Reducing transportation costs of goods and services for consumers; and
• Increasing the productivity of workers by reducing the travel times of service providers in the region and the number and extent of delays.
Additional Benefits
Additional benefits of the Project relate to anticipated long-term socio-community improvements, including: * Improving intra-municipal access by reducing highway queuing that currently spills onto municipal streets; * Providing improved cross-highway connectivity within municipalities that span both sides of Highway 407 * Maintaining local streets for local use by improving the efficiency of regional corridors; and improving air quality by reducing congestion-related idling vehicle emissions and providing reliable alternatives to the single occupant vehicle.
In addition, the design and construction partner, in response to the competitive selection process, proposed a number of value-added improvements beyond the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure’s requirements. These improvements will result in better safety, improved traffic flow and reduced operations and maintenance costs over time.

3. Project Delivery Options
The Ontario Ministry of Finance has mandated through its Capital Asset Management Framework (CAMF) that the following principles guide all public sector capital procurement:
• Fairness, openness and transparency;
• Allocation and management of risk;
• Value for money and protecting the public interest; and
• Competition
Project Procurement Objectives
In support of the Province’s Capital Asset Management Framework, procurement was carefully considered through the development of procurement objectives based on the Project goals. These procurement objectives were then used to help in identifying and assessing a range of procurement options for delivering the Project. The procurement objectives included:
• Achieving value for taxpayers’ dollars;
• Meeting the Province’s financial goals and constraints;
• Developing an attractive and marketable transaction;
• Achieving a fair and transparent procurement process;
• Ensuring public and stakeholder input throughout the delivery of the program;
• Achieving timely delivery and efficient Project sequencing;
• Ensuring effective asset performance throughout the Project term;
• Minimizing traffic impacts during construction; and
• Fulfilling all environmental obligations.

Design Bid Build (DBB)
This is a traditional project delivery model where the Province develops a detailed design for the construction requirements of the project. Once the design and specifications are complete, a tender call is issued. Toronto development group’s design-builder will take all the responsibility for performing the construction base work and design the project. Under DBB the Toronto development group’s design-builder will receive payment based on monthly completion. After the completion of project Toronto development group’s design-builder will hand the project to the province of Ontario.
In this model, separate parties are responsible for design, construction and maintenance at different times in the project’s life cycle and therefore opportunities for innovation in these areas are potentially not optimized
Design Build (DB)
In this project delivery model the Province enters into a DB agreement with a lead contractor who has the responsibility of both preparing the detailed design of the project and undertaking the construction. Combining the design and build aspects of construction focuses responsibility for the construction risks on a single entity. The lead contractor is paid based on certain construction milestones being achieved. However, the Province retains the responsibility and risk associated with the performance of the asset during the operations phase. The management of the interface between major project elements is the responsibility of the Province. When the DB agreement is complete, the asset is handed over to the Province who would then contract with an operations and maintenance contractor to perform those functions for the project

Design Build Finance Operate (DBFO)
In a DBFO agreement, the private partner accepts responsibility for arranging design, project financing and for carrying the costs of construction, operations and maintenance during the term of the agreement. The contractor typically receives compensation through a performance-based payment mechanism which may involve payments for road availability, safety, congestion management and other independent measures. The payment mechanism allows the application of penalties for non-performance during both the construction and operations phases. The penalties vary in severity depending on the type of non-performance.
In the case of the Highway 407 Improvement Project, the risk associated with the revenue stream from the collection of a toll led to the consideration of a variation of the DBFO arrangement. Like other DBFO arrangements, the private partner would be required to design, build, finance, operate, maintain and rehabilitate the corridor over the life of the agreement. However, once the Project had been substantially completed, instead of receiving compensation through a performance-based payment mechanism, the private partner would receive compensation through levying government regulated tolls on road users and would therefore assume the risk associated with this revenue stream. Thus, the private partner would bear the full cost of the Project regardless of whether or not the forecasted traffic volumes materialized. This approach would still include the ability to impose penalties for non-performance.

4. Competitive Selection Process

Once the preferred procurement model is determined, a competitive selection process for the Project will be designed that would be transparent, fair, encourage competition, and allow the selection of an industry partner that would best support the Province’s objectives and achieve value for taxpayers.

The RFP encouraged the proponents to innovate and provide their own design solutions as long as the performance standards set for the Project could be met or exceeded.

The RFP was based on an interactive approach that included extensive technical and commercial in-confidence workshops and topic meetings. These sessions were intended to address and work through any issues that will be faced during the course of this project.
Evaluation of the RFP will be undertaken by an evaluation team which will include leading experts in key areas of: -
• Highway safety;
• Construction traffic management;
• Highway design and construction;
• Finance;
• Environmental management; and
• Engineering.

Below table shows the completion of competitive selection process

Task Stage | Time taken | Outcome | Request for qualification | May 23, 2013 to June 15, 2013 | The project was marketed locally, provincially and nationally. Submissions from six respondents were evaluated and a shortlist of three teams was announced June 15, 2013 | Request for proposalSelection of preferred contractor | June 17, 2013 to May 30, 2014May 31, 2014 to August 19, 2014 | The three shortlisted teams submit proposals. And their proposal will be reviewed. After reviewing contact connect Toronto development group and let them know the team which is selected to do the project. | Agreement in principle | August 20, 2014 to January 28, 2015 | The parties agree to work to finalize terms of the agreement. | Design-build agreement | January 29, 2015 to February 16, 2015 | The Province make contract with the team which is going to design and build the Project. |

5. Final Design Build Agreement
Innovations/Benefits Gained from the DBFO Process
Significant innovative approaches to the final DB agreement and associated benefits were achieved as a result of undertaking a DBFO competitive selection process. These include:
• Competition and innovation: The competitive nature of the bidding process encouraged the proponent teams to develop innovative solutions in all aspects of the Project from design, construction and through to operations.
• Schedule and cost certainty: The risks of cost and schedule overruns are transferred to the DB contractor, thereby providing a financial incentive to complete the Project on time and on budget.
• Integration: One of the benefits of the DBFO delivery model is the integration of design, construction, long-term maintenance and rehabilitation of the Project into one agreement, with a single point of accountability and responsibility for those functions transferred to the private partner.
Risk Allocation Summary
Throughout the competitive selection process, the Province allocated risks according to which party would be best able to effectively manage those risks. For example, the DB partner is responsible for risks associated with design and construction, utilities, traffic management, environmental management and quality assurance. The Province is responsible for risks related to property acquisition and some off-corridor environmental work. There are also risks that are shared between the two parties, including events such as earthquakes and floods.
Due to increased economic and financial market instability after procurement commenced, the Province made the decision to cease negotiations and proceed with the DB agreement. As a result of proceeding with a DB agreement rather than a DBFO, some risks that were originally transferred to the private partner were retained by the Province. The Province also retained responsibility for operations, maintenance and rehabilitation for the Project.
However, the risk transfer associated with the DB agreement for the Project is an enhancement to the historic approach to DB agreements because it transfers risks in a manner consistent with typical DBFO agreements. For example, the majority of the construction schedule and construction cost risk remained the responsibility of the DB partner.
The DB agreement has been structured to pay the DB partner through construction milestones based on progress of the work, and the Province has capped its annual expenditure exposure by having maximum annual payment amounts.
7. Ongoing Design Build Agreement Monitoring
Under the DB agreement, this project is required to register for, and maintain the standards of, the ISO9001:2000 program, a program that focuses on maintaining established quality management standards. The DB agreement also includes checks and public interest safeguards to ensure project delivery, performance and high quality standards. Close monitoring spans the design and construction phases of the Project and includes, but is not limited to, the elements described below.
Self-Monitoring

Monthly quality management reports are required to undertake internal and external audits, and host bi-annual quality management committee meetings throughout the term of the agreement.
The following will be provided with open access:
• Bi-annual Quality Management Committee Meetings,
• Regular Quality Task Force Meetings,
• Work plans, and
• Project Quality Manager’s Monthly Quality Report.
Monitoring by Toronto development group’s design-builder Corp
During the construction phase the elements of this function will include:
• Process monitoring and quality surveillance;
• Independent structural engineering review of the improved lanes, design and construction;
• Independent structural engineering review of the on-shore structures; and
• Review of the monthly progress reports

Final Project Structure

While maintaining government oversight, the Transportation Investment Corporation (TI Corp) will manage all components of project delivery, including design, construction, financing and operations. TI Corp will act as the authority for the Project. The final DB agreement is a contractual arrangement. TI Corp is also responsible for the provision and consideration of additional improvements throughout the Project’s corridor to be completed when warranted by traffic volumes

The organization chart below depicts the overall project structure

Work Cited

Alexander, D. 1990. "Ups and Downs Of Traffic Calming." New Civil Engineer910: 12-3.

American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. 2001. A Policy on

Geometric Design of Highways and Streets. Washington, DC: The Association.

Appleyard, Donald. 1981. Livable Streets. Berkeley: University of California Press.

"Choose Paperless Billing!" 407 ETR. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Nov. 2013.

"Costs of Congestion." Costs of Congestion. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Nov. 2013.

Capital Asset Management Framework." Capital Asset Management Framework. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Nov. 2013.

Faludi, E. G. 1952. Land Development in the Metropolitan Area of Toronto. Toronto: The

Toronto Real Estate Board.

Hebbert, Michael. 2005. "Engineering, urbanism and the struggle for street design". Journal of

Urban Design 10, 1: 39-59.

Toronto. 2005. Operating and Capital Budget Summary 2005. <http://www.toronto.ca/

budget2005/pdf/2005budgetbook_link.pdf> Accessed: 20.04.2006

Toronto. Transporation Services. 2003. Summary of Traffic Calming Policy. June.

<http://www.toronto.ca/transportation/traffic/pdf/traffic_calming_policy_summary.pdf>

Accessed 02.03.2006.

Toronto. Urban Development Services. 2002. Toronto Official Plan.

<http://www.toronto.ca/torontoplan/official_plan.htm> Accessed 01.06.05.

"Welcome to the City of Toronto Website." City Planning. N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Nov. 2013

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Pmbok

...Project Management Institute A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) – Fifth Edition Licensed To: Jorge Diego Fuentes Sanchez PMI MemberID: 2399412 This copy is a PMI Member benefit, not for distribution, sale, or reproduction. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data A guide to the project management body of knowledge (PMBOK® guide). -- Fifth edition. pages cm Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-1-935589-67-9 (pbk. : alk. paper) 1. Project management. I. Project Management Institute. II. Title: PMBOK guide. HD69.P75G845 2013 658.4’04--dc23 2012046112 ISBN: 978-1-935589-67-9 Published by: Project Management Institute, Inc. 14 Campus Boulevard Newtown Square, Pennsylvania 19073-3299 USA Phone: +610-356-4600 Fax: +610-356-4647 Email: customercare@pmi.org Internet: www.PMI.org ©2013 Project Management Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. “PMI”, the PMI logo, “PMP”, the PMP logo, “PMBOK”, “PgMP”, “Project Management Journal”, “PM Network”, and the PMI Today logo are registered marks of Project Management Institute, Inc. The Quarter Globe Design is a trademark of the Project Management Institute, Inc. For a comprehensive list of PMI marks, contact the PMI Legal Department. PMI Publications welcomes corrections and comments on its books. Please feel free to send comments on typographical, formatting, or other errors. Simply make a copy of the relevant page of the book, mark the error, and...

Words: 162869 - Pages: 652

Premium Essay

Project Mgmt

...Project Management Institute A GUIDE TO THE PROJECT MANAGEMENT BODY OF KNOWLEDGE (PMBOK® Guide)—Fourth Edition 30, 0HPEHU &RS\ ² 1RW IRU 5HSURGXFWLRQ RU 'LVWULEXWLRQ An American National Standard ANSI/PMI 99-001-2008 ISBN: 978-1-933890-51-7 Published by: Project Management Institute, Inc. 14 Campus Boulevard Newtown Square, Pennsylvania 19073-3299 USA. Phone: +610-356-4600 Fax: +610-356-4647 E-mail: customercare@pmi.org Internet: www.pmi.org ©2008 Project Management Institute, Inc. All rights reserved. “PMI”, the PMI logo, “PMP”, the PMP logo, “PMBOK”, “PgMP”, “Project Management Journal”, “PM Network”, and the PMI Today logo are registered marks of Project Management Institute, Inc. The Quarter Globe Design is a trademark of the Project Management Institute, Inc. For a comprehensive list of PMI marks, contact the PMI Legal Department. PMI Publications welcomes corrections and comments on its books. Please feel free to send comments on typographical, formatting, or other errors. Simply make a copy of the relevant page of the book, mark the error, and send it to: Book Editor, PMI Publications, 14 Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, PA 19073-3299 USA. To inquire about discounts for resale or educational purposes, please contact the PMI Book Service Center. PMI Book Service Center P.O. Box 932683, Atlanta, GA 31193-2683 USA Phone: 1-866-276-4764 (within the U.S. or Canada) or +1-770-280-4129 (globally) Fax: +1-770-280-4113 E-mail: book.orders@pmi.org Printed in......

Words: 148336 - Pages: 594

Free Essay

Gti Specialist

...La Herramienta Esencial para Todo Director de Proyecto En 1983, los voluntarios del Project Management Institute (PMI®) se reunieron por primera vez para crear los fundamentos para la dirección de proyectos. Actualmente, la Guía del PMBOK® es reconocida como el estándar global para la dirección de proyectos y es uno de los mejores y más versátiles recursos disponibles para el profesional de esta disciplina. La Guía del PMBOK® contiene las prácticas fundamentales que todos los directores de los proyecto necesitan para alcanzar los más altos niveles de excelencia en sus proyectos. Actualmente, se encuentran en uso más de 2 millones de copias de la Guía del PMBOK®. A partir de la publicación de la Guía del PMBOK® – Cuarta Edición, el PMI ha recibido de parte de la comunidad global de la dirección de proyectos miles de valiosas recomendaciones en cuanto a mejoras y clarificaciones, que fueron revisadas y, según el caso, incorporadas en la quinta edición. La quinta edición se ha actualizado para incorporar los conocimientos y las prácticas más actuales en materia de dirección de proyectos. Se ha agregado una décima Área de Conocimiento para definir la participación adecuada de los interesados del proyecto en las decisiones y actividades clave. Se ha redefinido el flujo de datos e información del proyecto para aportar mayor consistencia y lograr una mayor alineación con el modelo de Datos, Información, Conocimiento y Sabiduría (DIKW) utilizado en el campo de la Gestión del......

Words: 217430 - Pages: 870

Premium Essay

Project Managment

...Includes Over Two Hours of Bonus Audio on the CD Includes Real-World Scenarios and Leading-Edge Exam Prep Software Featuring: Updated for the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), Fourth Edition • Custom Test Engine • Hundreds of Sample Questions • Chapter Review in Audio Format • Electronic Flashcards • Entire Book in PDF PMP Fifth Edition SERIOUS SKILLS. ® Project Management Professional Exam STUDY GUIDE Kim Heldman Project Management Professional Exam Study Guide Fifth Edition PMP ® Project Management Professional Exam Study Guide Fifth Edition PMP ® Kim Heldman Acquisitions Editor: Jeff Kellum Development Editor: Alexa Murphy Technical Editors: Terri Wagner and Brett Feddersen Production Editor: Christine O’Connor Copy Editor: Judy Flynn Production Manager: Tim Tate Vice President and Executive Group Publisher: Richard Swadley Vice President and Publisher: Neil Edde Project Manager 1: Laura Moss-Hollister Associate Producer: Angie Denny Quality Assurance: Josh Frank Book Designers: Judy Fung, Bill Gibson Compositor: Craig Woods, Happenstance Type-O-Rama Proofreader: Publication Services, Inc. Indexer: Nancy Guenther Project Coordinator, Cover: Lynsey Stanford Cover Designer: Ryan Sneed Copyright © 2009 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana Published simultaneously in Canada ISBN: 978-0-470-45558-6 No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any......

Words: 241705 - Pages: 967

Premium Essay

Project Management

...au or marked for the attention of the permissions editor at the address below. National Library of Australia Cataloguing-in-Publication Data Author: Title: Published in Australia by McGraw-Hill Education (Australia) Pty Ltd Level 2, 82 Waterloo Road, North Ryde, NSW 2113 Publisher: Norma Angeloni-Tomaras Development editor: Alex Payne Senior production editor: Claire Linsdell Permissions editor: Haidi Bernhardt Copy editor: Julie Wicks Proofreader: Angela Damis Indexer: Mary Coe Design coordinator: Dominic Giustarini Cover design: Christa Mo tt Internal design: Georgette Hall Typeset in Minion Pro Regular 9.5/12 pt by SR Nova Printed in China on 70 gsm matt art by CTPS Sa m Pearson, Neil. roject Project management in practice: for the certi cate IV and Diploma of Project Management in the BSB07 training package / Neil Pearson, Erik W. Larson, Cli ord F. Gray. ISBN: 9781743077238 (pbk.) Notes: Includes...

Words: 33240 - Pages: 133

Premium Essay

Paper

...Kennesaw State University ———————————————————————— Australia • Brazil • Japan • Korea • Mexico • Singapore • Spain • United Kingdom • United States Management of Information Security, Third Edition Michael E. Whitman and Herbert J. Mattord Vice President, Career and Professional Editorial: Dave Garza Executive Editor: Stephen Helba Managing Editor: Marah Bellegarde Product Manager: Natalie Pashoukos Developmental Editor: Lynne Raughley Editorial Assistant: Meghan Orvis Vice President, Career and Professional Marketing: Jennifer McAvey Marketing Director: Deborah S. Yarnell Senior Marketing Manager: Erin Coffin Marketing Coordinator: Shanna Gibbs Production Director: Carolyn Miller Production Manager: Andrew Crouth Senior Content Project Manager: Andrea Majot Senior Art Director: Jack Pendleton Cover illustration: Image copyright 2009. Used under license from Shutterstock.com Production Technology Analyst: Tom Stover © 2010 Course Technology, Cengage Learning ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this work covered by the copyright herein may be reproduced, transmitted, stored, or used in any form or by any means graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including but not limited to photocopying, recording, scanning, digitizing, taping, Web distribution, information networks, or information storage and retrieval systems, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without the prior written permission of the publisher. For product......

Words: 229697 - Pages: 919

Premium Essay

Bbm Is Here

...become the definitive handbook for agile teams.” —Colin Bird, Global Head of Agile, EMC Consulting “Mike Cohn’s experience working with so many different organizations in the adoption of agile methods shines through with practical approaches and valuable insights. If you really want agile methods to stick, this is the book to read.” —Jeff Honious,Vice President, Innovation, Reed Elsevier “Mike Cohn has done it again. Succeeding with Agile is based on his experience, and all of our experience, with agile to date. He covers from the earliest days of the project up to maturity and offers advice for the individual, the team, and the enterprise. No matter where you are in the agile cycle, this book has something for you!” —Ron Jeffries, www.XProgramming.com “If you want to start or take the next step in agile software development, this book is for you. It discusses issues, great solutions, and helpful guidelines when scaling up in agile projects. We used the guidelines from this book extensively when we introduced agile in a large, FDA-regulated department.” —Christ Vriens, Department Head of MiPlaza, part of Philips Research “If making the move to agile has always baffled you, then this book will unlock its mysteries. Mike Cohn gives us all the definitive, no-nonsense guide to transforming your organization into a high-powered, innovative, and competitive success.” —Steve Greene, Senior Director, Program Management and Agile Development, www.salesforce.com “Mike Cohn is a great......

Words: 194469 - Pages: 778

Free Essay

Valoracion Activos Electricos

...Project Scope Statement CONSULTORIA PARA LA VALUACION DE ACTIVOS DE EMPRESA DE TRANSMISION ELECTRICA 1 de 50 INDICE INTRODUCCION ................................................................................................................................... 4 ENTRADAS ........................................................................................................................................... 4 Contractuales .................................................................................................................................. 4 Procesos Organización CUSA............................................................ ¡Error! Marcador no definido. Factores Ambientales ...................................................................................................................... 4 TECNICAS Y HERRAMIENTAS ............................................................................................................... 5 Metodologías de Dirección de Proyectos - Cusa ............................................................................. 5 Sistema de Información de gestión de Proyectos - CUSA ............................................................... 5 Juicio de Expertos - CUSA ................................................................................................................ 5 PROJECT CHARTER STATEMENT .......................................................................................................... 6......

Words: 14413 - Pages: 58

Premium Essay

Ethics

...Third Edition This page intentionally left blank ETHICS IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Third Edition George W. Reynolds Australia • Brazil • Japan • Korea • Mexico • Singapore • Spain • United Kingdom • United States Ethics in Information Technology, Third Edition by George W. Reynolds VP/Editorial Director: Jack Calhoun Publisher: Joe Sabatino Senior Acquisitions Editor: Charles McCormick Jr. Senior Product Manager: Kate Hennessy Mason Development Editor: Mary Pat Shaffer Editorial Assistant: Nora Heink Marketing Manager: Bryant Chrzan Marketing Coordinator: Suellen Ruttkay Content Product Manager: Jennifer Feltri Senior Art Director: Stacy Jenkins Shirley Cover Designer: Itzhack Shelomi Cover Image: iStock Images Technology Project Manager: Chris Valentine Manufacturing Coordinator: Julio Esperas Copyeditor: Green Pen Quality Assurance Proofreader: Suzanne Huizenga Indexer: Alexandra Nickerson Composition: Pre-Press PMG © 2010 Course Technology, Cengage Learning ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this work covered by the copyright herein may be reproduced, transmitted, stored or used in any form or by any means graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including but not limited to photocopying, recording, scanning, digitizing, taping, Web distribution, information networks, or information storage and retrieval systems, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without the prior written permission of the publisher. For......

Words: 204343 - Pages: 818

Premium Essay

Leadership Development - Doe

...Leadership Development Seminars and ECQ-based Readings The success or failure of any endeavor depends on leadership. Now, more than ever before, we need leaders in our organizations and in our world. Great leaders create and communicate a vision and move people into action to achieve it. They ignite our passion and inspire us to do our best. Government leaders in the 21st century are experiencing change at a more rapid pace than previous generations. Rapid advances in technology have expanded the quantity of work we are capable of accomplishing, and also where it’s accomplished. We have a more highly educated workforce, yet face diminishing resources with an increased demand for productivity, and the essential services we provide to the American public. To be successful at navigating these challenges leaders must develop the essential skills to motivate their employees, effectively communicate with others, fine-tune critical thinking skills, and build and leverage partnerships. Future leaders must also be visionary; i.e., possess the ability to identify trends and the courage to be innovative. Being technically adept in your field will no longer be enough. In response to these demands on senior executives, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management identified five Executive Core Qualifications (ECQs) that all aspiring government leaders and executives must possess. These ECQs and Fundamental Competencies were developed by OPM after extensive research on the attributes...

Words: 181771 - Pages: 728

Premium Essay

Career Planning

...Leadership Development Seminars and ECQ-based Readings The success or failure of any endeavor depends on leadership. Now, more than ever before, we need leaders in our organizations and in our world. Great leaders create and communicate a vision and move people into action to achieve it. They ignite our passion and inspire us to do our best. Government leaders in the 21st century are experiencing change at a more rapid pace than previous generations. Rapid advances in technology have expanded the quantity of work we are capable of accomplishing, and also where it’s accomplished. We have a more highly educated workforce, yet face diminishing resources with an increased demand for productivity, and the essential services we provide to the American public. To be successful at navigating these challenges leaders must develop the essential skills to motivate their employees, effectively communicate with others, fine-tune critical thinking skills, and build and leverage partnerships. Future leaders must also be visionary; i.e., possess the ability to identify trends and the courage to be innovative. Being technically adept in your field will no longer be enough. In response to these demands on senior executives, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management identified five Executive Core Qualifications (ECQs) that all aspiring government leaders and executives must possess. These ECQs and Fundamental Competencies were developed by OPM after extensive research on the attributes...

Words: 181771 - Pages: 728

Free Essay

Pmbok

...La Herramienta Esencial para Todo Director de Proyecto En 1983, los voluntarios del Project Management Institute (PMI®) se reunieron por primera vez para crear los fundamentos para la dirección de proyectos. Actualmente, la Guía del PMBOK® es reconocida como el estándar global para la dirección de proyectos y es uno de los mejores y más versátiles recursos disponibles para el profesional de esta disciplina. La Guía del PMBOK® contiene las prácticas fundamentales que todos los directores de los proyecto necesitan para alcanzar los más altos niveles de excelencia en sus proyectos. Actualmente, se encuentran en uso más de 2 millones de copias de la Guía del PMBOK®. A partir de la publicación de la Guía del PMBOK® – Cuarta Edición, el PMI ha recibido de parte de la comunidad global de la dirección de proyectos miles de valiosas recomendaciones en cuanto a mejoras y clarificaciones, que fueron revisadas y, según el caso, incorporadas en la quinta edición. La quinta edición se ha actualizado para incorporar los conocimientos y las prácticas más actuales en materia de dirección de proyectos. Se ha agregado una décima Área de Conocimiento para definir la participación adecuada de los interesados del proyecto en las decisiones y actividades clave. Se ha redefinido el flujo de datos e información del proyecto para aportar mayor consistencia y lograr una mayor alineación con el modelo de Datos, Información, Conocimiento y Sabiduría (DIKW) utilizado en el campo de la......

Words: 92213 - Pages: 369

Premium Essay

Project Mgt

...SEVENTH EDITION PROJECT MANAGEMENT A Managerial Approach SEVENTH EDITION PROJECT MANAGEMENT A Managerial Approach Jack R. Meredith Broyhill Distinguished Scholar and Chair in Operations Wake Forest University Samuel J. Mantel, Jr. Joseph S. Stern Professor Emeritus of Operations Management University of Cincinnati John Wiley & Sons, Inc. DeDication To Avery and Mitchell, from “papajack.” J. R. M. To Maggie and Patty for their help, support, and affection. S. J. M. VICE PRESIDENT & EXECUTIVE PUBLISHER Don Fowley EXECUTIVE EDITOR Beth Golub ASSOCIATE EDITOR Jen Devine MARKETING MANAGER Carly DeCandia DESIGN DIRECTOR Harry Nolan SENIOR DESIGNER Kevin Murphy SENIOR PRODUCTION EDITOR Patricia McFadden SENIOR MEDIA EDITOR Lauren Sapira PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT SERVICES Ingrao Associates This book was set in by GGS Book Services PMG and printed and bound by RRD/Willard. The cover was printed by RRD/Willard. This book is printed on acid free paper.  Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, except as permitted under Sections 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without either the prior written permission of the Publisher, or authorization through payment of the appropriate per-copy fee to the Copyright Clearance Center,......

Words: 178405 - Pages: 714

Premium Essay

Projects

...ftoc.indd 16 10/10/08 5:17:22 PM SEVENTH EDITION PROJECT MANAGEMENT A Managerial Approach ffirs.indd 1 10/10/08 5:16:30 PM SEVENTH EDITION PROJECT MANAGEMENT A Managerial Approach Jack R. Meredith Broyhill Distinguished Scholar and Chair in Operations Wake Forest University Samuel J. Mantel, Jr. Joseph S. Stern Professor Emeritus of Operations Management University of Cincinnati John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ffirs.indd 3 10/10/08 5:16:35 PM ftoc.indd 16 10/10/08 5:17:22 PM Dedication To Avery and Mitchell, from “papajack.” J. R. M. To Maggie and Patty for their help, support, and affection. S. J. M. VICE PRESIDENT & EXECUTIVE PUBLISHER  Don Fowley EXECUTIVE EDITOR  Beth Golub ASSOCIATE EDITOR  Jen Devine MARKETING MANAGER  Carly DeCandia Design Director  Harry Nolan SENIOR DESIGNER  Kevin Murphy SENIOR PRODUCTION EDITOR  Patricia McFadden SENIOR Media editor  Lauren Sapira PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT SERVICES  Ingrao Associates This book was set in by GGS Book Services PMG and printed and bound by RRD/Willard. The cover was printed by RRD/Willard. This book is printed on acid free paper.  Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning or otherwise, except as permitted under Sections 107 or 108 of the......

Words: 181757 - Pages: 728

Premium Essay

From Pmbok

...Project Management Project and Programme Management Resources for Students Gower have teamed up with a major provider of project management training, ESI International, to bring you a range of project and programme resources to support your learning. Visit www.projectmanagement9.com and: • • • • Download white papers on topics as diverse as the project communication, project leadership, risk management and project troubleshooting. View professional project webinars from some of the leading presenters on project management covering topics such as: risk management, troubled project recovery, portfolio management, business requirements, earned value management, performance-based service contracting. Learn about the qualifications and development available from the PMI, Project Management Institute, the world’s largest non-profit professional association in project management. Link to further resources, professional bodies, news sites and more. These resources are designed to help you develop your learning on project management and start you on the road to professional qualifications or further development, once you have finished your degree or your current qualification. Visit www.projectmanagement9.com Project Management Ninth Edition DENNIS LOCK © Dennis Lock 2007 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or......

Words: 232485 - Pages: 930