Free Essay

Poems

In: English and Literature

Submitted By ceRa14
Words 3749
Pages 15
Literary

Appreciation

Submitted By:

Franchesca Shaira J. Apalisok

3rd year Knowledge

Submitted to:

Ms. Dulce Caisip

Table of Contents

I. Caedmon by: Venerable Bede

I.I Story Map

II. Lord Randal

III. Bony Barbara Allan

Caedmon

[pic]

Image copy of Cædmon's Hymn in the "Moore" manuscript (737), Cambridge, Kk.5.16, f. 128v, written in Northumbrian. This is the earliest known version of this work.

Cædmon ( /ˈkædmən/ or /ˈkædmɒn/) is the earliest English poet whose name is known. An Anglo-Saxon herdsman attached to the double monastery of Streonæshalch (Whitby Abbey) during the abbacy ((657–80) of St. Hilda (614–680), he was originally ignorant of "the art of song" but learned to compose one night in the course of a dream, according to the 8th-century monk Bede. He later became a zealous monk and an accomplished and inspirational religious poet.

Cædmon is one of twelve Anglo-Saxon poets identified in medieval sources, and one of only three for whom both roughly contemporary biographical information and examples of literary output have survived. His story is related in the Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum ("Ecclesiastical History of the English People") by Bede who wrote, "there was in the Monastery of this Abbess a certain brother particularly remarkable for the Grace of God, who was wont to make religious verses, so that whatever was interpreted to him out of scripture, he soon after put the same into poetical expressions of much sweetness and humility in English, which was his native language. By his verse the minds of many were often excited to despise the world, and to aspire to heaven."

Cædmon's only known surviving work is Cædmon's Hymn, the nine-line alliterative vernacular praise poem in honour of God which he supposedly learned to sing in his initial dream. The poem is one of the earliest attested examples of Old English and is, with the runic Ruthwell Cross and Franks Casket inscriptions, one of three candidates for the earliest attested example of Old English poetry. It is also one of the earliest recorded examples of sustained poetry in a Germanic language.

Caedmon

By: Venerable Bede

THERE was in this abbess's monastery a certain brother, particularly remarkable for the grace of God, who was wont to make pious and religious verses, so that whatever was interpreted to him out of Scripture, he soon after put the same into poetical expressions of much sweetness and humility, in English, which was his native language. By his verses the minds of many were often excited to despise the world, and to aspire to heaven. Others after him attempted, in the English nation, to compose religious poems, but none could ever compare with him, for he did not learn the art of poetry from men, but from God; for which reason he never could compose any trivial or vain poem, but only those which relate to religion suited his religious tongue; for having lived in a secular habit till he was well advanced in years, he had never learned anything of versifying; for which reason being sometimes at entertainments, when it was agreed for the sake of mirth that all present should sing in their turns, when he saw the instrument come towards him, he rose up from table and returned home.

Having done so at a certain time, and gone out of the house where the entertainment was, to the stable, where he had to take care of the horses that night, he there composed himself to rest at the proper time; a person appeared to him in his sleep, and saluting him by his name, said, "Caedmon, sing some song to me." He answered, "I cannot sing; for that was the reason why I left the entertainment, and retired to this place because I could not sing." The other who talked to him, replied, "However, you shall sing." ­ "What shall I sing?" rejoined he. "Sing the beginning of created beings," said the other. Hereupon he presently began to sing verses to the praise of God, which he had never heard, the purport whereof was thus: We are now to praise the Maker of the heavenly kingdom, the power of the Creator and his counsel, the deeds of the Father of glory. How He, being the eternal God, became the author of all miracles, who first, as almighty preserver of the human race, created heaven for the sons of men as the roof of the house, and next the earth. This is the sense, but not the words in order as he sang them in his sleep; for verses, though never so well composed, cannot be literally translated out of one language into another, without losing much of their beauty and loftiness. Awaking from his sleep, he remembered all that he had sung in his dream, and soon added much more to the same effect in verse worthy of the Deity.

In the morning he came to the steward, his superior, and having acquainted him with the gift he had received, was conducted to the abbess, by whom he was ordered, in the presence of many learned men, to tell his dream, and repeat the verses, that they might all give their judgment what it was, and whence his verse proceeded. They all concluded that heavenly grace had been conferred on him by our Lord. They expounded to him a passage in holy writ, either historical, or doctrinal, ordering him, if he could, to put the same into verse. Having undertaken it, he went away, and returning the next morning, gave it to them composed in most excellent verse; whereupon the abbess, embracing the grace of God in the 'man, instructed him to quit the secular habit, and take upon him the monastic life; which being accordingly done, she associated him to the rest of the brethren in her monastery, and ordered that he should be taught the whole series of sacred history. Thus Caedmon ' keeping in mind all he heard, and as it were chewing the cud, converted the same into most harmonious verse; and sweetly repeating the same, made his masters in their turn his hearers. He sang the creation of the world, the origin of man, and all the history of Genesis : and made many verses on the departure of the children of Israel out of Egypt, and their entering into the land of promise, with many other histories from holy writ; the incarnation, passion, resurrection of our Lord, and his ascension into heaven; the coming of the Holy Ghost, and the preaching of the apostles ; also the terror of future judgment, the horror of the pains of hell, and the delights of heaven; besides many more about the Divine benefits and judgments, by which he endeavored to turn away all men from the love of vice, and to excite in them the love of, and application to, good actions; for he was a very religious man, humbly submissive to regular discipline, but full of zeal against those who behaved themselves otherwise; for which reason he ended his life happily.

For when the time of his departure drew near, he labored for the space of fourteen days under a bodily infirmity which seemed to prepare the way, yet so moderate that he could talk and walk the whole time. In his neighborhood was the house to which those that were sick, and like shortly to die, were carried. He desired the person that attended him, in the evening, as the night came on in which he was to depart this life, to make ready a place there for him to take his rest. This person, wondering why he should desire it, because there was as yet no sign of his dying soon, did what he had ordered. He accordingly went there, and conversing pleasantly in a joyful manner with the rest that were in the house before, when it was past midnight, he asked them, whether they had the Eucharist there? They answered, "What need of the Eucharist? For you are not likely to die, since you talk so merrily with us, as if you were in perfect health." ­" However," said he, "bring me the Eucharist." Having received the same into his hand, he asked, whether they were all in charity with him, and without any enmity or rancour? They answered, that they were all in perfect charity, and free from anger; and in their turn asked him, whether he was in the same mind towards them? He answered, "I am in charity, my children, with all the servants of God." Then strengthening himself with the heavenly viaticum, he prepared for the entrance into another life, and asked, how near the time was when the brothers were to be awakened to sing the nocturnal praises of our Lord? They answered, "It is not far off." Then he said, "Well, let us wait that hour;” and signing himself with the sign of the cross, he laid his head on the pillow, and falling into a slumber, ended his life so in silence.

Thus it came to pass, that as he had served God with a simple and pure mind, and undisturbed devotion, so he now departed to his presence, leaving the world by a quiet death; and that tongue, which had composed so many holy words in praise of the Creator, uttered its last words whilst he was in the act of signing himself with the cross, and recommending himself into his hands, and by what has been here said, he seems to have had foreknowledge of his death.

Story Map

• Setting

The setting of the story was set place in an abbess's monastery.

• Characters nad Characterization

Caedmon- a certain brother particularly remarkable for the Grace of God, who was wont to make religious verses, so that whatever was interpreted to him out of scripture, he soon after put the same into poetical expressions of much sweetness and humility in English, which was his native language. By his verse the minds of many were often excited to despise the world, and to aspire to heaven.

• Plot

An Anglo-Saxon herdsman attached to the double monastery of Streonæshalch (Whitby Abbey) during the abbacy ((657–80) of St. Hilda (614–680), he was originally ignorant of "the art of song" but learned to compose one night in the course of a dream, according to the 8th-century monk Bede. He later became a zealous monk and an accomplished and inspirational religious poet.

Cædmon is identified in medieval sources, and one of only three for whom both roughly contemporary biographical information and examples of literary output have survived. His story is related in the Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum ("Ecclesiastical History of the English People") by Bede who wrote, "there was in the Monastery of this Abbess a certain brother particularly remarkable for the Grace of God, who was wont to make religious verses, so that whatever was interpreted to him out of scripture, he soon after put the same into poetical expressions of much sweetness and humility in English, which was his native language. By his verse the minds of many were often excited to despise the world, and to aspire to heaven."

• Central Theme

In this poem Caedmon wants to show the role of God in creation and he wants to say also that man should not give up something because he or she should struggle hard in order to have his goal, this is what happened with Caedmon when his company asked him to sing and then he dreamed about this song .Also this literary work suggests some religious issues in relation to creation and showing god's power we should convert to Christianity

• Moral

Always think that He is always there for us, helping us in our problems, guiding us in our way and fulfilling our wishes. In the story it also states that always have a trust in yourself, don’t always think negative…ALWAYS THINK POSITIVE! Always have a confidence in yourself and trust in your skills, abilities, talents and capabilities, don’t ever lose hope in yourself.

Ballad

A ballad is a form of verse, often a narrative set to music. Ballads were particularly characteristic of British and Irish popular poetry and song from the later medieval period until the 19th century and used extensively across Europe and later the Americas, Australia and North Africa. Many ballads were written and sold as single sheet broadsides. The form was often used by poets and composers from the 18th century onwards to produce lyrical ballads. In the later 19th century it took on the meaning of a slow form of popular love song and the term is now often used as synonymous with any love song, particularly the pop or rock power ballad.

The ballad probably derives its name from medieval French dance songs or "ballares" (from which we also get ballet), as did the alternative rival form that became the French Ballade. In theme and function they may originate from Scandinavian and Germanic traditions of storytelling that can be seen in poems such as Beowulf.The earliest example we have of a recognisable ballad in form in England is ‘Judas’ in a 13th-century manuscript.

LORD RANDALL

"Lord Randall", or "Lord Randal", (Roud 10, Child 12) is an Anglo-Scottish border ballad, a traditional ballad consisting of dialogue. The different versions follow the same general lines: the primary character (in this case Randall, but varying by location) is poisoned, usually by his sweetheart; this is revealed through a conversation where he reports on the events and the poisoner.Variants of this ballad are found in Danish, German, Magyar, Swedish and Wendish. Similar ballads exist across Europe. There are, for example different Italian versions, usually titled "L'avvelenato" ("The Poisoned Man") or "Il testamento dell'avvelenato" ("The Poisoned Man's Will"). One of them was published for the first time in 1629 by Camillo il Bianchino, in Verona.

One of the oldest traditional ballads in the English language. It is though that Lord Randal might be Randolph, 6th Earl of Chester who died in 1232. He was poisoned by his wife. Langland's "Vision of Piers the Ploughman" has a reference which may be to this ballad when a character says "I ken rymes of Robin Hode and Randolf Earl of Chester". The ballad is known all over Britain and in North America, sometimes under different titles. On variant in England is "Henry my son", but the form is always of a young man who has been poisoned bequeathing his goods to his relatives, but to his "true-love" the means for retribution. There are various tunes and the one here is from England.

Lord Randal

"O where ha you been, Lord Randal, my son?

And where ha you been, my handsome young man?"

"I ha been at the greenwood; mother, mak my bed soon,

For I'm wearied wi hunting, and fain wad lie down."

"An wha met ye there, Lord Randal, my son?

And wha met ye there, my handsome young man?"

"O I met wi my true-love; mother, mak my bed soon,

For I'm wearied wi huntin, and fain wad lie down."

"And what did she give you, Lord Randal, My son?

And wha did she give you, my handsome young man?"

"Eels fried in a pan; mother, mak my bed soon,

For I'm wearied wi huntin, and fein wad lie down."

"And what gat your leavins, Lord Randal my son?

And wha gat your leavins, my handsome young man?"

"My hawks and my hounds; mother, mak my bed soon,

For I'm wearied wi huntin, and fein wad lie down."

"And what becam of them, Lord Randal, my son?

And what becam of them, my handsome young man?

"They stretched their legs out and died; mother mak my bed soon,

For I'm wearied wi huntin, and fain wad lie down."

"O I fear you are poisoned, Lord Randal, my son!

I fear you are poisoned, my handsome young man!"

"O yes, I am poisoned; mother, mak my bed soon,

For I'm sick at the heart, and fain wad lie down."

"What d'ye leave to your mother, Lord Randal, my son?

What d'ye leave to your mother, my handsome young man?"

"Four and twenty milk kye; mother, mak my bed soon,

For I'm sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie down."

"What d'ye leave to your sister, Lord Randal, my son?

What d'ye leave to your sister, my handsome young man?"

"My gold and my silver; mother mak my bed soon,

For I'm sick at the heart, an I fain wad lie down."

"What d'ye leave to your brother, Lord Randal, my son?

What d'ye leave to your brother, my handsome young man?"

"My houses and my lands; mother, mak my bed soon,

For I'm sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie down."

"What d'ye leave to your true-love, Lord Randal, my son?

What d'ye leave to your true-love, my handsome young man?"

"I leave her hell and fire; mother mak my bed soon,

For I'm sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie down."

Questions:

1. What is the central theme of the story?

The theme of the story is about Lord Randall’s father, having a hard time after his son’s death and he is looking for him. He is also asking why his’ son left all the persons whom his son loved. Lord Randall was killed because he was poisoned.

2. Who are conversing in the poem?

Lord Randal and his father are the persons conversing throughout the ballad “Lord Randal” but Lord Randall is not answering because his father is just talking to him and asking him.

3. What words or phrases are repeated?

These are the repeated wors:

- "O where ha you been, Lord Randal, my son? And where ha you been, my handsome young man?"

- mother, mak my bed soon

- my handsome young man

- What d'ye leave to your “(sister,brother,lover)”, , my handsome young man

- For I'm sick at the heart, and I fain wad lie down

Bony Barbara Allan

Most of the ballads have as their subject a tragic incident, often a murder or an accidental death, generally with supernatural elements.

One of the interesting characteristics of these ballads is that their telling and retelling has caused details to be changed. For instance: in Barbara Allen" the hero's name has become Sir James of the Grave, John Green and Jemmy Grove .

There are at least 92 versions of the tragic love ballad "Barbara Allen." The one presented here is one of the oldest and so it may be as near to the original Scottish story as any that can be found.

The Ballad of Barbara Allen", also known as "Barbara Ellen," "Barbara Allan," "Barb'ry Allen," "Barbriallen," etc., is a folk song known in dozens of versions. It has been classified as Child Ballad 84 and Roud 54. The author is unknown, but the song may have originated in England or Scotland. The earliest known mention of the song is in Samuel Pepys' diary for January 2. 1666 (ed. Robert Latham & William Matthews, Vol. vii, London: [1972], p. 1.) where he refers to the "little Scotch song of 'Barbary Allen'".

Bony Barbara Allan

In Scarlet Town, where I was born,

There was a fair maid dwellin'

Made every youth cry well-a-day

Her name was Barbara Allen.

All in the merry month of May

When green buds they were swellin',

Young Jeremy Grove on his deathbed lay

For love of Barbara Allen.

He sent his man unto her then,

To the town where she was dwellin'.

"You must come to my master dear,

If your name be Barbara Allen,

For death is printed on his face

And o'er his heart is stealin'.

Then haste away to comfort him,

O lovely Barbara Allen."

Though death be printed on his face

And o'er his heart be stealin',

Yet little better shall he be

For bonny Barbara Allen.

So slowly, slowly, she came up

And slowly she came nigh him,

And all she said when there she came,

"Young man, I think you're dyin'."

He turned his face unto her straight

With deadly sorrow sighin'.

"O lovely maid, come pity me;

I'm on my deathbed lyin'."

"If on your deathbed you do lie

What needs the tale you're tellin'?

I cannot keep you from your death.

Farewell," said Barbara Allen.

He turned his face unto the wall

As deadly pangs he fell in.

"Adieu! Adieu! Adieu to you all!

Adieu to Barbara Allen!"

As she was walking o'er the fields

She heard the bell a-knellin'

And every stroke did seem to say,

"Unworthy Barbara Allen."

She turned her body 'round about

And spied the corpse a-comin'.

"Lay down, lay down the corpse," she said,

"That I may look upon him."

With scornful eye she looked down,

Her cheek with laughter swellin',

That all her friends cried out amaine,

"Unworthy Barbara Allen."

When he was dead and laid in grave

Her heart was struck with sorrow.

"O mother, mother, make my bed

For I shall die tomorrow.

Hard-hearted creature, him to slight

Who loved me so dearly,

O that I had been more kind to him,

When he was live and near me!"

She on her deathbed, as she lay,

Begged to be buried by him

And sore repented of the day

That she did e'er deny him.

"Farewell," she said, "ye virgins all,

And shun the fault I fell in.

Henceforth take warning by the fall

Of cruel Barbara Allen.

Questions:

1. What is the story all about?

The ballad “Bony Barbara Allan” is all about the love of young Jeremy Grove for Barbara Allan and the fact he was already dying but Barbara Allan still rejected him for his’ love.

2. What aroused the anger of Bony Barbara?

Her lover’s stubbornness aroused the anger of Bony Barbara, because her lover wants Bony Barbara want to become pity on him because he said he’s already “dying”.

3. How did the man in the story hurt Barbara Allan?

The young boy named Jeremy Grove hurt Barbara Allan. He hurt her by leaving her alone because he died and as what Barbara Said in the Ballad "O mother, mother, make my bed for I shall die tomorrow. Hard-hearted creature, him to slight Who loved me so dearly that I had been more kind to him, When he was live and near me!"

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...The poem I chose to write about is called “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” Written by Robert Frost. The poem is from the point of view of an old man who has been riding through the woods and stops. It is the middle of the night and he is watching the snow fall as we can plainly see from the lines “He will not see me standing here/to watch the woods fill up with snow” and “between the woods and frozen lake/ the darkest evening of the year.” To me it seems that the idea of this poem is stopping and enjoying little things in life, even things like a snowy wood in the middle of the night. Something so simple could be very beautiful if you take the time to notice it. The poem also seems to give the idea that we can enjoy little things in life but not forget our important obligations. This idea is expressed in the lines “But I have promises to keep/ and miles to go before I sleep/ miles to go before I sleep.” I can’t say I can personally relate to this poem. I do however agree with the idea of it. I think it’s very important to take breaks in life. If someone works to hard and takes everything too seriously they will miss out on little things in life. I enjoy nature and being outside so this poem relates to me in that way. I can easily see myself stopping just like the man in the poem to watch the silent woods for a moment. Things like those woods that can keep a person sane. In this poem Robert Frost uses a very effective rhyme scheme to keep a smooth rhythm.......

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...mountain-slide of magic dollars and cents to cancel knowledge of the stomach's pain; eyes learning what will later reach his brain. In time they'll be afraid to hear his curse at god's unholy Sunday-school arrangement, put him inside wire-mesh or worse, and sunbathe in the same sun on his hearse or perish if his bullet gets them first. [Cecil Gray] In a single word or short phrase, state what you consider to be the most dominant subject or idea that the poem communicates In a single sentence, state the theme or statement that the poem makes (implies) about the subject you selected. Identify and list three effective techniques or devices that help to convey this statement. For each device you identified, write a brief statement (one sentence) explaining its effectiveness (what it contributes to the poem, its function). Taking into consideration your responses thus far, formulate a working thesis you could use to guide your analysis of this poem. Using between 80 and 100 words, present the introductory paragraph (which of course must include your thesis) of the critical analysis essay you would...

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...| |Thursday, January 16th | |In class we’ll read the poem, “My Papa’s Waltz” by Roethke (274), practice textual analysis, and work on an | | | |outline. | | | |Homework: Pg. 276, questions 14-16, and “making an argument” 4; | | | |Read the poem, “Those Winter Sundays” by Hayden (13) and answer | | | |questions 1-6. | | | | | |Tuesday, January 21st | |In class we’ll re-read the poem, “Those Winter Sundays” by Hayden, look at an earlier draft, practice textual | | | |analysis, and work on an outline. | | | |Homework: choose one line from either poem that connects the most | |...

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...beamingnotes.com Optimized 16 minutes ago View original Refresh Menu Search Submit Our Casuarina Tree Analysis by Toru Dutt By Ishaan on July 29, 2013 5 SHARES 4 COMMENTS Analysis of Our Casuarina Tree by Toru Dutt Our Casuarina Tree is a poem by Toru Dutt which is about the Casuarina tree that grew in the poetess’ courtyard and her memories associated with it. Summary The poetess writes this in reminiscence of the Casuarina tree that grew in the courtyard of her childhood home. The poem opens with a description of the tree, tall enough to make it seem like it touches the stars, strong enough to continue growing despite scars on its trunk and despite all this it provides support to a creeper. And yet she gives it the air of a Gentleman when she describes how the tree is forever adorned with flowers and birds and bees. Thus we see the tree in her childhood was not only as a paragon of strength, but gentle and loved by the birds and bees. अब मीठे मना मत क जये सु एक गलास पानी म ल यह... को !हर बह म रोज २ पाउं घटाती ँय क म रात को सफ़ एक लास पीती ँ ड् स She goes on to tell us about the mornings in her childhood when she would wake up to the sight of the Casuarina Tree. Come summer or winter, her morning would remain incomplete without the sight of the Casuarina tree, often with a baboon sitting on its crest. She then paints a serene picture of the morning with the kokilas singing, the cows on the pasture and the water lilies in the spring. However, the figure of the......

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...Smiling is infectious Smiling is infectious You catch it like the flu When someone smiled at me today I started smiling too I walked around the corner And someone saw me grin When he smiled I realised I had passed it on to him I thought about the smile And then realised its worth A single smile like mine Could travel round the earth So if you feel a smile begin Don't leave it undetected Start an epidemic And get the world infected. Reason to Smile How can one smile such sweet smiles,  When one is so saddened by sorrows for miles,  How can I smile the same smiles,  When life brings me nothing but tears,  I wondered for so long,  What reason you had to smile that long,  To keep smiling though troubles come,  And still remain sweet and silently overcome,  It's such a mystery to me,  Your smiles from heaven with glee,  I adore and yet envy thee,  But I'd rather you smile those at me,  I feel happy when I see you smile,  Even if I'm sad and lonely,  Your smiles bring me somewhere,  I don't even know where,  But it was you,  You gave me the reason to smile,  To smile with no reason,  To smile for a smile,  I guess life is just like that,  We need not a reason to smile,  For a smile is the reason itself,  To rejoice and open-heartedly give thanks,  I learned to smile because of you,  Because your smiles bring me joy when blue,  It proves how well and powerful,  A simple sweet smile can become so beautiful,  Smile for the......

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...English 1020 Beauty by Tony Hoagland I found this poem to be both sad and uplifting. It tells the story of two sisters, one the butterfly perfectly shaded, finding all the most perfect flowers; the other one, the voyeur, in the background watching and amazed at the flight of the butterfly. The sister tells the story of how beautiful her sister had been until the medication she was taking caused permanent blue stitches that formed across her cheeks. The beautiful sister knowing that her beauty was gone forever, seemed to let it go like it was a burden to her for the longest time. After all those years of watching her sister nurture her beauty, the narrator knew more than anyone else what those tiny blue stitches would cost her sister. The narrator reflects back to high school years when her sister had perfected the art of being a dumb blond, the way she stood in the breezeway tossing her “bedspring” hair. “Laughing with that canary trill voice,” her specialty. There were hints of jealousy from these statements. She had a football player for a boyfriend, most likely the star of the team. He would do anything she wanted as you could tell from the “pained expression in his eyes.” The beautiful sister didn’t date men; she held “auditions,” looking for the one man who had the attention span that would hold her interests. She looked for ten long years, and still was not married. In these times most women were married younger, but these women......

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...Poetry Essay ENGL 102 Composition and Literature Spring A 2011 Nicholas Leonard MLA OUTLINE I. Thesis: The use of Imagery, sooth words, and a unique rhythm are ways that authors of poems try to attract readers but in Robert Frost’s “The road not taken” he compels the reader by using aspects in his life to appeal to readers and maybe even without realizing it himself. II. Background on the author a. Family b. Travel c. Education d. Work III. Setting of poem e. Relation to authors background f. Culture g. Environment IV. Symbolism h. Definitions i. Decisions j. Outcome of decision V. Conclusion k. Restate thesis The Decision The use of Imagery, sooth words, and a unique rhythm are ways that authors of poems try to attract readers but in Robert Frost’s “The road not taken” he compels the reader by using aspects in his life to appeal to readers and maybe even without realizing it himself. This aspect in his poems can be difficult for people to analyze what he was trying to portray in his poems, so if we decide to go there we must analyze every aspect of Mr. Frost to get a clearer image of what he truly is saying. Robert Frost was born on March 26, 1874 in San Francisco California to a previous cotton plant family from New England. Frost graduated high school as valedictorian in 1892 and started collage at Dartmouth but ended abruptly as he asked a lovely......

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