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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Vietnam War Veterans

In: Social Issues

Submitted By tcupchak
Words 1645
Pages 7
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Vietnam War Veterans
COMM/156
4/14/2013
Professor Marsha Parker

PTSD is an anxiety disorder classified as a mental illness caused by exposure to terrifying or life threatening events. During the time of war, people get exposed to devastating experiences such as sexual abuse, witnessing murder of family members or familiar people, and other horrors of war. As a result, the victims suffer from mental disorders since the horrible experiences are forever ingrained in their mind. Bearing in mind that bad memories are rarely erased, the experiences can be compared to a horror movie that is often played in the mind and constantly frightens the victim to death. On one hand the victim celebrates survival but on the other hand the experiences haunt one through night mares or flashbacks. The victim remains constantly on edge and is easily startled. Some common feelings include intense guilt and some time numbness- all signs of posttraumatic stress disorder (TMP, 2012). A research finding by Bruce Dohrenwend and colleagues from New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia’s Letter Carrier School of Public Health, shows that traumatic experiences during war predicted the onset of PTSD in Vietnam veterans (Mikulak, 2013). We will examine the PTSD in Vietnam War veterans.
Human existence has been always exposed to traumatic incidences of various kinds. For instance, attacks by lions or even the twentieth century terrorist attacks to some extent elicit similar psychological problems in the victims who survive the incidences. In the 1980s, the American Psychiatric Association added posttraumatic stress disorder to another edition of its diagnostic and statistical manual of the medical association; the science guiding classification of diseases. Friedman (2011) goes ahead to argue that for one to fully understand...

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