Prison Industrial Complex

In: Social Issues

Submitted By majerism
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The Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility in Mississippi houses 1,200 boys and young men. An NPR news investigation into the juvenile prison examined public records associated with federal grants paid to the Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility. Those records showed how Warden Brick Tripp and his deputy wardens had been receiving checks for $2,500 to $5,000 as "supplemental salaries" for administering federal Title 1 education funds (Burnett 3). In a phone interview, Cole stated he had no knowledge of the warden and the deputy dealing with educating students. In attempt to get further evidence behind the reward of salaries, the attempt was met with a declined interview from the warden. Furthermore, it was not made clear why the deputy was receiving bonus checks. GEO Group's Paez who was asked why the prison administration was receiving supplementary paychecks from federal education grants, which have nothing to do with the civil rights lawsuit or Justice Department investigation, replied with no comment (Burnett 3). NPR wondered if this was normal. Considering the town of Walnut Grove is so small, where inmates outnumber citizens 2 to 1. The people of the town primarily rely on the prison. 200 prison jobs helped fill the void when a shirt manufacturer and a glove maker closed and moved overseas several years ago (Burnett 3). This “sweet deal” for the Walnut Grove enables the prison to pay the town $15,000 in lieu of taxes - which comprises nearly 15 percent of its annual budget. That is a lot of money for a small town that according to the Mayor which “helps [them] maintain a full-time police department that [they] wouldn't be able to afford without that income." Due to this community making money off of the prison, this raises the question of whether people are overseeing the Walnut Grove Youth Correctional Facility or any other Prison Facility negligence…...

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