Psychodynamic Theory

In: Philosophy and Psychology

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Psychodynamic Theory Debate
Janice Birdsong, Melissa Johnston, and Helene Torres
Psy/405
November 10, 2014
Instructor Krasner

Psychodynamic Theory Debate
Jung and Klein, I think for the purpose of this debate we get a quick description of your theories. Klein, let us start with you.
In my theory of object relation, we focus on the importance of the mother child relationship. My theory was built on my interpretations of childhood during the first four to six months where most children begin showing behavior traits toward specific people in their lives. Yes, my theory was built from Freud’s idea of instincts just as most psychoanalytical psychologists work, but my work emphasizes the importance of interpersonal relationships, we focus more on the significance of mothers, and the key motivation in my theory is human connection and how we relate. I believe we are all predisposed to certain personalities. Something Freud and I both accepted was the “existence of phylogenetic endowment” (Feist and Roberts, 2013, p. 144). I also believe that young children adopt defense mechanisms such as introjection, splitting, projective identification, and projection to protect themselves from destructive fantasies and the anxiety that follows.
Jung, please give us a description of your theory as well.
I, too, was a colleague of Freud and some of my work also was built on ideas he formed. When I went in my own direction I coined the idea of analytical theory. My theory was based on “the assumption that occult phenomena can and do influence the lives of everyone” (Feist and Roberts, 2013, p. 102). Like Freud, I do believe people are motived by repressed understandings, except I also believe that we inherit experiences that are emotionally driven from our ancestors. My theory also consists of archetypes that can only be acquired when there is a balance between within our…...

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