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Psychology and Health Issues Program Review

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Psychology of Health in the Workplace

Psychology of Health in the Workplace
Kristin Haimowitz
HCA/250
January 22, 2012
Wakita R. Bradford

Psychology of Health in the Workplace
A good attitude can go a long way in making the place where you work a more tolerable place to be. Having a healthy lifestyle can make it easier to deal with the smaller problems that seem to happen on a day to day basis. Health psychology is concerned with understanding how biological, psychological, environmental, and cultural factors are involved in physical health and the prevention of illness. Due to recent advances in psychological, medical, and physiological research, it had lead to new ways of thinking about health and illness. This conceptualization, which has been labeled the biopsychosocial model, views health and illness as the product of a combination of factors including biological characteristics (e.g., genetic predisposition), behavioral factors (e.g., lifestyle, stress, health beliefs, and social conditions (e.g., cultural influences, family relationships, social support) (Marks, 2011).
People have developed a field of health psychology that helps people deal with stressors that they are involved with at their workplace. Many experts perform research to help them solidify their findings. Occupational Health Psychology (OHP) has developed from these studies, and does research so that they can better understand the needs of people in their work settings. Also, OHP looks to understand how psychosocial characteristics of individual workplaces affect the health and well being of people who work. OHP is also concerned with developing strategies to effect change at workplaces so that it can improve the health of the people that work. OPH is mostly concerned with many and various diseases, such as accidents and injuries all the way to cardiovascular problems.
Did you know that a person’s home life may carry over to their performance at work? This can hinder your poor performance and a bad review....
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