Public Employees Allowed to Strike

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Submitted By flakiita1
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Should Public Employees Be Allowed to Strike?
Public sector employment involves working for any “local, state or federal agency”, effectively making the government the main employer for all public sector workers. Organized labor in the US has been a big part of the public sector since the early 1900’s, but this arena has seen some drastic changes occur in the last century. Looking at the data, it is clear to see that union membership has declined from 1/3 of the nationwide non-agricultural work force, to a mere 12.3% in recent years. Since then though, we also see a sharp decline in private sector unions, but interestingly enough, there was an increase in public-sector union membership, which is now estimated to be around 7.9 million employees. In addition, numerous economists agree, and have stated time and time again, that public sector unions and the political power they currently hold actually increases government spending, by making public goods and services unavailable through strikes, and by skewing the overall pay grade for public sector jobs at a National scale. The main problem being, that the overall demographic of union members in the last 50 years has dramatically changed. To put it in perspective, the public sector usually a higher wage for lower end jobs when compared to the private sector. The Bureau of Labor Statistics released its data and concluded that the average median pay for office clerks actively working in the public sector was $27K in 2005, the average median pay for the same jobs in the private sector was $23K. When compared to more skilled workers, or those with advanced degrees, the opposite is true, which is why we see the demographic change between the private and public sector workforce members.
The statistics above don’t lie, and as New Jersey Governor Chris Christie said, “There has to be a parity between what is happening…...

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