Punk Movement

In: Film and Music

Submitted By EonSpirit
Words 1984
Pages 8
POPMUS 305
The Punk movement as a reaction to stagnant music scene of the 70s

Ivan Stevanovic 3461726

The Punk movement is often seen as a reaction to what was regarded as a blown up and stagnant, self-indulging music scene in the mid-70s. In wider perspective, it is considered not merely as a music genre, but more as a complex mixture of social, cultural, rebellious upheaval of the marginal, disillusioned young white generation, first in the US and UK and then in the rest of the western world.
This essay will try to explore these statements and find out whether any of the two can be considered as the only cause for the emergence of punk.

MUSIC INFLUENCES AND BACKGROUND

One would say that any form of modern music in its initial phase is a protest, by default. That could be supported by numerous examples throughout the music history when rebellious young artists were crossing the boundaries of the conventional music genres and styles and often rejected from the music establishment.
The stylistic music origins of punk could be found in second half of the twentieth century. First it was rock’n’roll of the fifties that shook the post war society with its wild rhythms and raw cords played on electric guitars amplified to produce more “noise”.
The other influences were R&B, country and rockabilly and in the 60s many sub-genres that emerged on the rock music scene like: garage rock, frat rock, psychedelic rock, pub rock, glam rock, and proto-punk.
Although its origins can be traced back as far as you like, with every generation having its own youth sub-culture that shocks the established order (for some Elvis was a punk), punk as we know it today began in the early 1970s.
It was bands like The Fugs, the MC5 and The Stooges that sowed the seeds, but the first groups to take on the recognisable attitude and style were the New York Dolls and Television, who…...