Premium Essay

Race and the South

In:

Submitted By GERALD710
Words 2565
Pages 11
Student Name:
Lecturer’s Name:
Date:
Southern Contemporary Fiction and the Issue of Race
Thesis: Southern contemporary fiction contained a lot of truths about the race relations between Black and White Americans in the twentieth century.
Introduction
Since the beginning of the twentieth century, there has been a significant shift in the focus of southern literature, both fiction and nonfiction. In the nineteenth century, most Southern fiction works were mainly on the Civil War and the Reconstruction. However, as that generation died away, the new crop of authors who had never experienced the civil war or the Reconstruction became more objective in their writings about the South. Contemporary Southern writers such as Harper Lee, Tennessee Williams and William Faulkner wrote fiction, but the stories written had a lot of truth about the way communities in the American South lived like in the twentieth century. As a result, one cannot fail but notice that there is one recurring issue in almost every novel in contemporary Southern fiction; the issue of race. (Sundquist 1994) Authors usually write stories which are a reflection of the attitudes and the norms of their time and contemporary Southern fiction reflects this. The southern part of the United States has always had a large percentage of people of African descent living there. At the beginning of the twentieth century, two states actually had an African-American majority; South Carolina and Mississippi. However, the White community was, and still is the socially and economically dominant group and this can be seen in much of Southern contemporary. Several aspects of race were explored by various authors and they include: Racist words against blacks
Contemporary Southern fiction frequently contained a lot of racist words, lines and dialogue. In Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird,

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Social Psychology Assignment

...xmazibuko16@gmail.com Xolani Mazibuko xmazibuko16@gmail.com A comprehensive view of South African race relations. A comprehensive view of South African race relations. Race relations in South africa Social Psychology assignment 1 Race relations in South africa Social Psychology assignment 1 Table of contents Contents 1. Introduction: 2 2. The impact of Social cognition and schemas on race relations: 2 3. Role of attribution and attitudes in understanding race relations: 5 4. Impact of prejudice and discrimination on race relations: 7 5. Social influence: how it impacts race relations in South Africa 10 6. Conclusion: 11 Reference list: 12 1. Introduction: When speaking of racial relations, one is referring to types of behaviours which are exhibited by individuals after being in contact or interacting with people of various physical and cultural characteristics. (Balandier, 1956). Race relations debates have very prevalent in countries all over the world, South Africa being no exception. Due to the diverse nature of the county’s population, the topic of race relations still continues to dominate discourse in democratic South Africa. Since 1994, the citizens of South Africa have strived to eradicate racism and hostile racial relations. However, it has not been smooth sailing to move beyond racial lines as a source of division. In fact, the racial nuances still cling on stubbornly as race becomes a daily tormentor, making it very difficult to erode the edifices of...

Words: 4241 - Pages: 17

Premium Essay

Social Psychology Assignment

...xmazibuko16@gmail.com Xolani Mazibuko xmazibuko16@gmail.com A comprehensive view of South African race relations. A comprehensive view of South African race relations. Race relations in South africa Social Psychology assignment 1 Race relations in South africa Social Psychology assignment 1 Table of contents Contents 1. Introduction: 2 2. The impact of Social cognition and schemas on race relations: 2 3. Role of attribution and attitudes in understanding race relations: 5 4. Impact of prejudice and discrimination on race relations: 7 5. Social influence: how it impacts race relations in South Africa 10 6. Conclusion: 11 Reference list: 12 1. Introduction: When speaking of racial relations, one is referring to types of behaviours which are exhibited by individuals after being in contact or interacting with people of various physical and cultural characteristics. (Balandier, 1956). Race relations debates have very prevalent in countries all over the world, South Africa being no exception. Due to the diverse nature of the county’s population, the topic of race relations still continues to dominate discourse in democratic South Africa. Since 1994, the citizens of South Africa have strived to eradicate racism and hostile racial relations. However, it has not been smooth sailing to move beyond racial lines as a source of division. In fact, the racial nuances still cling on stubbornly as race becomes a daily tormentor, making it very difficult to erode the edifices of...

Words: 4241 - Pages: 17

Premium Essay

Eugenics In South Africa

...Dutch and the British colonized the previously unexplored South Africa in a drive for modernity. The rapid English domination of the Dutch offspring (known as Boers or Afrikaners) resulted...

Words: 3217 - Pages: 13

Free Essay

Soc 120 Week 2 Prejudice and Discrimination

... Matiko Bivins Prejudice and Discrimination When reflecting on my six-month expedition to South Africa, I recognized various aspects of prejudice and discrimination. Although racial categories in South Africa have been abolished, many native countrymen still view themselves and others according to these categories. Race is the classification system to categorize people based on physical characteristics, but has not scientific significance. “Blacks are the largest racial group in South Africa (approximately 79% [of the total population]) (Shutts, Kinzler, Katz, Tredoux, & Spelke, 2011)” consisting of several ethnic groups, such as Khoi-San, Xhosa, Zulu, Ndebele, Sotho, Venda, and Shangaan. Ethnicity is cultural traits shared by a category of people; religion, language, and national origin are types of ethnic classifications. However, the minority of white South Africans have more freedom and opportunities because of the unspoken racial separation within the government and workforce. Khoi-San is the unified name of two ethnic groups, who share physical characteristics and languages of the Bantu region. They are known to have small, short frames, copper-brown skin, high cheekbones, and slanted eyes differentiating them from their dark African counterparts. They are native to the semi-desert regions in South Africa. The Venda live in remote, mountainous region near the southern tip. They are a mix of many cultures, like Central African...

Words: 1171 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Race and My Community

...Race and My Community Ethnic and racial issues continue to exist in many communities today. Before I took this class, I thought that race and ethnicity meant the same thing. After reading chapter one of the required text book for this course, I found out that they have very different meanings. I believe that, as a minority, no matter where you move to or what town you decide to make your home, whether it is temporary or permanent, you will encounter some form of ethnic and racial issues. The meaning of ethnicity is a group set apart from others because of its national origin or distinctive cultural patterns. On the other hand, race is described as a group that is socially set apart because of obvious physical differences. As an African American, I grew up on the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, in an all-Black neighborhood, and lived there until around my mid 40’s. I moved to the South Suburbs of Chicago, first to Harvey, and lived there for about four years before moving to where I now currently reside in South Holland. I lived in Harvey, Illinois, for about three years. It is a town dominated mainly by African Americans. According to the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau statistics, Harvey, Illinois, is home to 75.8% African Americans and 19.0% Hispanics. The White population of Harvey is only 10.0% (State and County Quick Facts, 2010). There is a lot of crime that goes on in Harvey within the African-American neighbordhoods, and I believe that it is partly due to the environment...

Words: 1447 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Comparing The Fisk Jubilee Singers, Henry W. Grady, And George Washington Cable

...representation of the South. Each individual had their own distinctive characteristics, but all understood that race was still an issue at this time. The Fisk Jubilee Singers was a group of students at Fisk University that started performing songs about the African American life during slavery. This group was “refusing to hide behind a mask of servility or buffoonery.” It was inspiring how at first, it was solely money based, but as time past, it became more about racial equality. The book mentions a story about the bass player expressing his frustration whenever they were denied to stay at northern hotels. This example shows the lack of equality and racism that still existed. These singers offered a glimpse into the past by performing slave spiritual songs and demonstrating the progress the African American race persevering through the hard times of race division. Henry W. Grady also acknowledged that there was a race division, but took the stand towards white supremacy as depicted as he “unapologetically insisted in an 1887 speech.” Grady claimed...

Words: 446 - Pages: 2

Free Essay

South Africa

...South Africa Have you ever wonder if there is another person just like you in another country. Are that someone may be doing the same exact thing that you are doing at that moment or even like the same things you like. We would never know the answer to that question, unless we get out and explore the world of choices. I want you to lay back and close your eyes and dream of a place you would love to explore. As you do that I want you to keep in mind the following the different cultures you may come in contract with. See if discrimination still exists in that country you are visiting and what are the problems. What ethnic groups are in this country? South Africa is a country that is located at the top of Africa as you look at it; it put you in the mind of a guenia pig. It has diverse cultures and languages. Majority of the ethnic groups are black African. South Africa has many problems with discrimination that is widely spread around the world. I am here today to give you a bit of information of the things I have stated in this paragraph. As a child I always wonder about other cultures in countries, the different racial groups, and if discrimination was still going on in the world all over. Now I am able to explore the different things that may occur in other countries. Cultures Food: One of the cultures that caught my eye was the food that they eat. South African cuisine reflects the indigenous population and the country's many settlers. One of the most popular influences...

Words: 1190 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Usa and South Africa

...Phoenix  COM/155 When most people are asked what they think of South Africa compared to the United States, the most common response that is given is that South Africa is a desert like the remaining continent of Africa is; this is as far from the truth as possible. Would you have ever thought that two countries could be so similar yet so different at the same time? South Africa is as up in the technology world as the United States is; if not further along to some degree. It is known to have the largest research association of great white sharks off of any coast. Although the United States and South Africa have several similarities, they are also quite different because the United States has a lower violence and poverty rate than South Africa. One similarity between the Unites States and South Africa is that they are a huge melting pot of ethnicity and race, that had to fight for what they believed was right between the higher percentages of races. Both countries races consist of whites, blacks, Asians, and Indians. But there is a huge difference in the race percentages’, according to "Race and Ethnicity in the United States" (n.d.), the majority of the more than 300 million people currently living in the United States consists of White Americans, who trace their ancestry to the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa. In South Africa, black's makeup 79.0% of the total population ("Ethnic Groups in South Africa", n.d.). The percentage of all white households that...

Words: 1198 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Southpark V Boondocks

...helping create more television shows. People all come from different backgrounds, different locations, and different generations; fortunately this creates even more opportunity for television show creators because they are able to make more television shows based on all these differences within our society. Two television shows that specifically show the differences within our society are South Park and the Boondocks. South Park and the Boondocks are similar televisions shows, yet have differences between them as well. To begin with, the big difference between the shows is that the main characters of each are different races, and similarity of the two is that each week one issue is dedicated to an entire episode. Comedy Central’s South Park is an animated show made for an older audience created by Matt Stone and Trey Parker. The show is known for being extremely offensive to most people but the creators say there is a lesson to be learned in every episode. The Boondocks is an animated show that was created by Aaron McGruder. The show is based on race relations and African American culture. Race, ethnicity and class are three topics easily found throughout the weekly episodes. People in our society tend to watch more and more television shows that relate more and more to them personally....

Words: 1371 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

The Apatheid

...Christian Ahearn Mr. Power College Composition 12 December 2008 The Apartheid in South Africa Imagine if you were denied a job because of your race. You could not go here or there whenever you wanted, or you were not allowed to receive healthcare, or were punished severely for what you thought was a petty crime. You would go to receive a marriage license but you would hear, “Sorry, interracial marriages aren’t allowed hear.” These were a few of the difficulties people of the nonwhite (black) population faced in South Africa during the apartheid. The apartheid was an unyielding governmental procedure of segregation and discrimination of the nonwhite population for the country of South Africa (Apartheid…). This paper will give the history of the country of South Africa and the development of the government which started the apartheid. Segregation of the South African population will be described by giving information and examples about the different social classes and job opportunities individuals were allowed to have based on their race. The intent of the paper is to show the hardships that the South African nonwhites faced and their struggles to become equal during the vast period of governmentally enforced segregation. The apartheid began with the enactment of the apartheid laws in 1948 and lasted until 1991 (Apartheid in…). During the time in which the apartheid laws were in effect the country was divided and the majority of the population was poverty stricken. In...

Words: 3157 - Pages: 13

Premium Essay

Analysis Of The Race Beat: The Civil Rights Movement

...impressions of Gene Roberts and Hank Klibanoff's, The Race Beat: The Press, The Civil Rights Struggle, and The Awakening of a Nation. The role of media is seen from generation to generation. The book records the progression of how the media reported the Civil Rights Movement and the issues and circumstances involving race that the media utilized. The Race Beat examines the United States press. It demonstrates many years of disregarding the issues of racism and recognizing the significance of the civil rights. White press reporting of African-Americans in the south was overlooked. Only the negative things were recognized. Discrimination had an impact on communicating what was going on at this time. This has transformed into one of the most essential news periods of America's time. It shows the role that the press had in...

Words: 1101 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Is There a Resource Curse in South Africa?

...Is there a resource curse in South Africa? Introduction Collier (2007) introduced the concept of the natural resource trap, a situation in which countries have access to natural resources that should enable a country to benefit and develop economically, but has the opposite effect by enslaving the country in poverty. In my analyses of Collier’s (2007) argument on why countries are subject to a resource trap, I focus on the concept of Dutch Disease within the South African primary sector and the aggravating factors caused by economic shocks. I analyse the degree to which the South African has indeed become reliant on the primary sector for sustaining its economy, with emphasis on the mining and agricultural components of the primary sector. However, I also extend on Collier’s (2007) argument by incorporating the views of other authors. An important view and one also central to my argument is that of Grimsley and Hay’s (2004), who refers to a “balanced economy” (p. 97) in the context of the “equity and mutual benefit” (p. 98) for the society as a whole. Translating the Collier (2007) argument to the South African context Collier (2007) indicates that Dutch disease, in combination with volatile commodity prices, is a significant contributor towards the natural resource trap. Barder (2006) describes the original concept of Dutch Disease in which the Dutch experienced large foreign exchange earnings due to the export of the gas. This led to a shift in the Dutch currency exchange...

Words: 2620 - Pages: 11

Free Essay

Miss

...Assignment Number: PORTFOLIO EXAM 892092 Witness: Clint Newkirk 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 MEDIA POLICY AND REGULATION 1.1 History of communication policy 1.1.1 Emerging communications industry policy 1.1.2 Public service media policy 1.1.3 New communications policy 1.2 Freedom of the media 1.2.1 The need for freedom of speech 1.2.2 Threats to it 1.2.3 If, how and why such threats can or cannot be motivate 2 MEDIA MANAGEMENT AND MEDIA MARKETS 2.1 Media concentration 2.1.1 The relationship of competition to concentration 2.1.2 The dual nature of the media industry 2.1.3 The four forms of concentration 2.1.4 The dangers of concentration 2.1.5 Positive externalities of the media 3 REPRESENTATION AND THE MEDIA 3.1 Media representation of race 3.1.1 Discussion 3.1.2 Brief explanation of the meaning whiteness 3.2 Media representation of violence 3.2.1 An introductory thesis (argument) 3.2.2 Define and explain representation, violence and moral panics 3.2.3 an overview of different theories 3.2.4 Discussion of the processes 3.2.5 A concluding argument 3.3 Media representation of HIV and Aids 3.3.1 Introduction to discussion 3.3.2 Illustration of discussion 3.3.3 Impact of the article 3.3.4 Media attention 3.3.5 Placing and timing of article 4 ADDENDUM A: SELF ASSESSMENT AND SELF REFLECTION SOURCES CONSULTED ILLUSTRATIONS PAGE 4 4 4 4 5 6 6 6 6 9...

Words: 12513 - Pages: 51

Premium Essay

Race in My Community

...Race in My Community ETH-125 December 4, 2011 Mamie Tapp Race in My Community The city of Columbia, South Carolina seems to be diverse enough like any other metropolitan area in the Unites States. From the outside looking in you may think that the cultural diversity in this city is leveled, fair and consistent; nevertheless there are several political, financial and racial factors that display a different truth. Anyone with little knowledge of this city perhaps will think that fairness in the marketplace and job sites is impartial; clearly that is the apparent view. Some racial issues for my thesis are connection with problems among Hispanics, Whites and Black Americans. The infrastructure of the city is evidently diversified among these three races; they each display their interest in the community in a very particular way. The representation of willful racial segregation is evident among those groups, and sometimes to the extent where hate and racial crimes are committed. From the financial perspective, the city is mostly influenced and control by the white population, Black Americans are the secondary driving factors with little influence by the Hispanic community and other minorities such as Asian Americans and Middle East descent citizens. During the months that I have lived in Columbia I have noticed that the majority of the citizens do not look like me. Growing up I was part of a largely Hispanic community in Miami, FL and the influence of Hispanics...

Words: 1564 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Social Stratification in South Africa

...Social Stratification in modern South Africa by Jabu Banda 512424 Introduction Max Weber viewed social stratification from three dimensions (Wright, EO): economic class, social status and power (party). According to Weber each of these dimensions had its own stratification: the economic, represented by income and access to goods and services, the social, represented by prestige and honour and the political, represented by power .Unlike Marx Weber paved the way for us to incorporate race and ethnicity dimensions in relation to social stratification. South Africa has always been and still is very much a society divided along racial lines. There has however been a gradual but undeniable shift from a society divided along race under apartheid towards division along economic class post 1994. We can attribute this shift largely to the significant political landscape change but we still need a deeper understanding of the forces driving this shift. This paper will therefore attempt to analyze modern day South African society in relation to Weber’s model of social stratification with the view establish its validity and relevance in a local context. We are presented by opportunity to perhaps explore impact this shift has had economically. In other words what the impact has been on access to products and services, media, health, education and so forth. The dimension of power and politics was very central to Weber’s theory, it is therefore natural that we examine the impact the shift from...

Words: 1337 - Pages: 6