Premium Essay

Reflect First Amendment

In: Historical Events

Submitted By shellybell98
Words 2203
Pages 9
Running Head: THE FIRST AMENDMENT

[pic]

Reflections on the First Amendment
NAME
University of Phoenix Online
United States Constitution – HIS301

Reflections on the First Amendment Judged by the sheer number of cases brought to the Supreme Court for debate, the First Amendment can be considered one of the most controversial amendments in the Bill of Rights. The First Amendment was written to address three fundamental liberties all citizens have: religion, speech and peaceful assembly. On closer inspection, there are six very different ideals melded together into one defining statement. When the U.S. Constitution was signed on Sept. 17, 1787, it did not contain important freedoms that are now outlined in the Bill of Rights, because many of the Framers viewed some of the freedoms as unnecessary. However, after vigorous debate, the Bill of Rights was adopted. The first freedoms guaranteed in this historic document were expressed in 45 words written by James Madison that we have come to know as the First Amendment. The First Amendment states that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” Freedom of expression, artistic or otherwise in the United States is governed by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Without a doubt the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution is one of the most important rights afforded to us as Americans. Our freedom of expression and right to freedom of religion from government interference is protected by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. Freedom of expression consists of the right to freedom of speech, press, and to petition the government for a…...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

Conflict Diamonds

...artist who is about to release your first CD. One of the major things that has inspired you is the Constitution, specifically the amendments (you loved Ms. Wunderlich’s class that much!). For this assignment, you will create a CD that lists your song titles. The song titles will all reflect the chosen amendments below. (i.e. you do not need to do all 27 amendments…just the ones listed below). Also, your CD will only include the song titles, NOT the whole song. To create your CD, think of a particular type of music you want to do (country, classic rock, hip/hop, rap) and create a cover that represents that theme. Then , look at what each amendment discusses and create the title of a song that would be about that amendment. For example, a song about the first amendment might be “I say, I say, I say what I want” which reflects the idea of freedom of speech. You may not use the name of the amendment as a song title. For example, I do not want to see Track 1: Freedom of Speech, Track 2: Right to Bear Arms. When you list your song titles, the track numbers must match the number of your amendment. For example, a song about women voting needs to be track #19. *Your CD must be of high quality and well put together and colorful. CD’s that are written in pen or pencil on lined sheet of paper will not be graded. To reiterate, this is what you will turn into me: CD with 19 song titles that match their amendment numbers with a cover that reflects a genre of music and the......

Words: 435 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Constitution

...Constitution was the first form of government. The Bill of Rights was later added. The United States Constitution and Amendments were established to fix the problems stated in the Declaration of Independence. The Constitution is the world’s longest surviving written charter of government. The phrase “We the People” is one of the first fixes between the Constitution and Declaration of Independence. These three words affirms that the government of the United States will serve its citizens. The Constitution has remained in force to this day, because its framers successfully separated and balanced government. The United States Constitution supports and reflects the idea of the Declaration of Independence. The Constitution also addressed the complaints in the Declaration of Independence. The US Constitution created a government of three branches—executive, legislative, and judicial, granting unique powers to each branch. “He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good.” (Declaration of Independence) The king of Great Britain refused to set laws for the common good of the people. “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for redress of grievance.” (United States Constitution; Amendment I) So according to the first amendment, the people’s......

Words: 752 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Reflections of the First Ammendment

...Reflections on the First Amendment Shellene Lewis History/301 July 03, 2013 Brona Pinnolis Reflections on the First Amendment In Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1965 twenty three black college students were arrested in an attempt to integrate a local eatery. To express their outrage Rev. B. Elton Cox led 2,000 black college students on a march to protest the incarceration of the students. Rev. Cox was a later arrested and convicted for breaching the peace, obstructing a public passageway and picketing the court house. To what extent does the Constitution protect the right of privacy? “The U. S. Constitution contains no express right to privacy. The Bill of Rights, however, reflects the concern of James Madison and other framers for protecting specific aspects of privacy, such as the privacy of beliefs (1st Amendment), privacy of the home against demands that it be used to house soldiers (3rd Amendment), privacy of the person and possessions as against unreasonable searches (4th Amendment), and the 5th Amendment's privilege against self-incrimination, which provides protection for the privacy of personal information. In addition, the Ninth Amendment states that the "enumeration of certain rights" in the Bill of Rights "shall not be construed to deny or disparage other rights retained by the people." The meaning of the Ninth Amendment is elusive, but some persons have interpreted the Ninth Amendment as justification for broadly reading the Bill...

Words: 347 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Constitution Paper

...The United States Constitution was the first form of government. The Bill of Rights came later but proved to fix many problems. The United States Constitution and Amendments were established to fix the problems stated in the Declaration of Independence. It is amazing to say The Constitution is not only the nations but the world’s longest surviving written charter of government. The famous phrase “We the People” is one of the first fixes between the Constitution and Declaration of Independence. These three words affirms that the government of the United States will serve its citizens and the people are what matters to the government. The Constitution is still in forced to this day, because it successfully separates and balances our government. The United States Constitution not only supports but truly reflects the idea of the Declaration of Independence. The Constitution addressed the many complaints of the Declaration of Independence. The US Constitution created a government of three branches—executive, legislative, and judicial, granting unique powers to each branch. “He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good” (Declaration of Independence). The king of Great Britain rejected and refused the idea of setting laws for the common good of the people. The king never had the interest of his people at heart. “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the......

Words: 782 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Accounting

...Question 5: Proposed amendments to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements The board proposes to amendment IAS 1 to state explicitly that an entity shall present the components of changes in equity either in the notes to the financial statements or in the statements of changes in equity, the amount per share of dividends recognized as distributions to owners. Proposed amendments to IFRS 1 First-time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards The board proposes to amendment IFRS 1 First-time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards as following: Accounting policy changes in the year of adoption The board proposes to amend IFRS 1 to clarify that if the first-time adopter changes its accounting policies or use of the exemption of IFRS 1 after it has published its interim financial report with IAS 34 Interim Financial Reporting, it explains those changes and updates the reconciliations. Revaluation basis as deemed cost The board proposes to amend IFRS 1 to clarify that permits the first-time adopter to use a revaluation basis as deemed cost when an event such as a privatization triggered a revaluation at or before the date of transition to IFRSs. The proposal reflect the Board’s conclusion that the reasons for getting that exemption were equally valid for similar revaluations that occurred after the date of transition to IFRSs but during the periods covered by the fist IFRS financial statements.......

Words: 343 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

15th Amendment

...An assignment on 15th amendment of the Bangladesh constitution. The 15th amendment of the Bangladesh constitution is perhaps the most debatable one in the post democratic era that follows the 1990 public upsurge against autocracy. The often pronounced justifications offered for this amendment is the ‘needs’ for returning to the spirit and contents of the founding constitution of 1972 of Bangladesh. Yet the 15th amendment rather accommodates some of the changes brought out by the 5th and 7th amendments, both made by the Martial Law regime and recently declared illegal and unconstitutional by the apex court of the country. 15th amendment, like most of the previous amendments, also largely failed to reflect comparative constitutional studies. Such study is considered essential for learning the experiences of constitutionalism in relevant jurisprudences and borrowing or adapting them in amending a nation’s own constitution. Although the 1972 constitution of Bangladesh was indigenous in part, the 1972 Constituent Assembly (led by Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman) enriched our constitution by the same process of borrowing and/or adapting from models and concepts of foreign constitutions. For example: collective responsibility of ministers to Parliament and functions of parliamentary committees were taken from UK system, the concept of fundamental principle of state policy from India and Ireland, the provisions of human rights and Judicial review from US constitutional......

Words: 2036 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Is There a Right Way of Interpretation of the First Amendment?

...Is There A Right Way Of Interpretation Of The First Amendment? The interpretation of the First Amendment as well as the entire Constitution has been a controversial issue for debates for decades. The majority of Americans simply interprets the First Amendment the way they see for it to be convenient for a particular situation. Because of its vagueness, the First Amendment leaves a lot of room for various arguments and assumptions. When we look at the textual interpretation of the First Amendment, context plays a vital role. The context tells us not to concentrate on details and to give words an expansive rather than narrow interpretation. Although interpretation of the text can take on many forms and there is no the right one, words do have a limited range of meaning, and no interpretation that goes beyond that range should be permissible, especially when we are dealing with such an important document as the First Amendment. The article “On Racist Speech” by Charles R Lawrence serves as a great example of argumentative interpretation of the First Amendment. Charles Lawrence examines the power of words that can insult, assault and even exclude. He challenges the thought that all speech should be protected and urges his readers to examine their own beliefs and expectations of what their civil rights are. The author also presents a strong critique of the First Amendment that protect us from defamation, invasion of privacy while at the same time leaves the...

Words: 1270 - Pages: 6

Free Essay

Week Two Assignment Pol 303

...and local governments. As well it will cover harsher penalties for hackers. The paper will also cover some of the disadvantages of the Patriot Act. Such as screening peoples phone calls and E-mails possibly infringing on a persons’ Fourth Amendment rights. The first thing this paper is going to discuss is how the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism or the USA Patriot Act. The Patriot Act helps throughout the multiple levels of the government, from federal to the local government. One way is within this act it allows the multiple levels of the government to share information between organizations. “The Act removed the major legal barriers that prevented the law enforcement, intelligence, and national defense communities from talking and coordinating their work to protect the American people and our national security. The government's prevention efforts should not be restricted by boxes on an organizational chart. Now police officers, FBI agents, federal prosecutors and intelligence officials can protect our communities by "connecting the dots" to uncover terrorist plots before they are completed.” (Preserving Life & Liberty, n.d.) Also the Act updated the law to reflect the technologies and threats of today’s day and age. This change made the law technology-neutral; it placed electronic trespassers on the same footing as physical trespassers.” (Preserving Life & Liberty, n.d.) Now that we......

Words: 879 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Failed Amendments

...The Equal Rights Amendment is one of the twenty-seven failed amendments to the United States Constitution. This amendment would give equal rights to men and women, under federal and state laws within the United States. The amendment was written in 1923, by Alice Paul, a suffragist leader and founder of the National Woman’s Party. It was presented at every Congress from 1923, until 1972 when it was passed and sent to the states for ratification. However, only 35 out of the 38 required states, ratified the amendment, it was given an extension until 1982, but still failed to pass and has become extinct within Congress. The amendment has been proposed at every Congress since its failure to be ratified. The proposed amendments states that “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.” The amendment has three sections, and this statement is featured as the first. The second section states that “The Congress shall have the power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article,” and the third section states that “This amendment shall take effect two years after the date of ratification.” Essentially, the amendment would affirm the equal application of the United States Constitution, to both sexes. However, according to some opposers of the Equal Rights Amendment, it would also take away some of the rights granted to women in previous years. The amendment would require women to sign...

Words: 1208 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Politics

...Constitution written in the 18th Century does not work in the 21st Century’ Discuss (30 marks) America’s first form of Constitution, the Articles of Confederation, was ratified in 1781 and it can be argued that many states operated as independent countries under this. After America won its independence from Britain in 1783, it become increasingly evident that the USA needed a stronger, central government to remain stable and so the US Constitution was created and signed on 17th September 1787 in Philadelphia. This Constitution is still used today and is at the heart of American Politics but the debate lies in whether an 18th Century document is acceptable for the present day. A Constitution written in 18th Century does not work in the 21st Century because it is difficult to update and some parts make no sense in today’s society such as the Second Amendment and the Electoral College, as there have been four occasions when the candidate who got the most votes lost the election. The amendment process is too difficult, thus making is almost impossible to remove parts no longer necessary or to add parts that the majority desires. For example, the Second Amendment, in the Bill of Rights, allows US citizens the right to bear arms, which has caused much conflict as it has become increasingly evident that people are willing to abuse this right. Attempts to overturn the Second Amendment have been very much refused due to the rigid, outdated Constitution. The power of judicial......

Words: 806 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Pdf, the Constitution

...Cuthbertson University of Phoenix How the Constitution addressed the complaints in the Declaration of Independence: The United States Constitution was established to help set-up the first form of government, in the year 1787, and the Bill of Rights was later added in the year 1791. The Constitution was established for the common good of all people. The Constitution and Amendments were written to fix the problems stated in the Declaration of Independence which was written in the year 1776. The United States Constitution reflects and supports the idea of the Declaration of Independence. Many different problems from the Declaration of Independence needed to be fixed through the Constitution.”He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good”. (Declaration of Independence) The King of Great Britain refused to set laws for the common good of all people. Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble and to petition the Government. So according to the first amendment, the people’s common good is protected by Congress. There were several economic problems said in the Declaration of Independence, for example:” the imposing of taxes on us without our consent.” (Declaration of Independence) Colonists were......

Words: 762 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Case Brief

...Baker v. Carr Facts Charles Baker (P) was a resident of Shelby County, Tennessee. Baker filed suit against Joe Carr, the Secretary of State of Tennessee. Baker’s complaint alleged that the Tennessee legislature had not redrawn its legislative districts since 1901, in violation of the Tennessee State Constitution which required redistricting according to the federal census every 10 years. Baker, who lived in an urban part of the state, asserted that the demographics of the state had changed shifting a greater proportion of the population to the cities, thereby diluting his vote in violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. Baker sought an injunction prohibiting further elections, and sought the remedy of reapportionment or at-large elections. The district court denied relief on the grounds that the issue of redistricting posed a political question and would therefore not be heard by the court. Issues 1. Do federal courts have jurisdiction to hear a constitutional challenge to a legislative apportionment? 2. What is the test for resolving whether a case presents a political question? Holding and Rule 1. Yes. Federal courts have jurisdiction to hear a constitutional challenge to a legislative apportionment. 2. The factors to be considered by the court in determining whether a case presents a political question are: 1. Is there a textually demonstrable constitutional commitment of the issue to a coordinate political......

Words: 1154 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Constitution

...representatives, and the state representatives in turn elected a weak central government, one so feeble that it was unworkable. This league of states, hastily crafted during wartime, had to be replaced with a real government. The challenge was devising stable institutional arrangements that would reconcile majority rule and minority rights, that is, reflect the consent of the governed but avoid majority tyranny. The new constitution would need to secure the rights promised in the Declaration of Independence and do so through a republican form of government. The founders responded with a written Constitution that created a strong government of limited powers, with the then-novel institutions of the separation of powers and federalism. Amendments to the Constitution Amendment I The first ten Amendments (Bill of Rights) were ratified effective December 15, 1791 Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. Amendment II A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed....

Words: 428 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Justifying the Bill of Rights

...Justifying the Bill of Rights Professor Maria Toy, J.D. LEG107 The amendments to the United States Constitution play an important role in the history, politics and law of our country. When the Bill of Rights was originally proposed to the First Federal Congress in 1789 by James Madison, the intent was for the amendments to be integrated into the original text of the Constitution. As we now know, Madison’s idea did not prevail and Congress decided the first ten amendments and the subsequent seventeen be appended (BYU Journal of Public Law [Volume 25], January 1, 2011). The amendments are an integral part of the Constitution, the framework of the incomparable American justice system that has great impact on the legal system and political climate of the United States. Each of the amendments was written either to overrule a Supreme Court decision, to force societal change, or to revise details of the existing Constitution. The Constitution is an evolving document that some believe is “a living constitution that was written so it could adapt to a changing nation” (Huey-Burns, 2010). Additionally, many of the modern day issues we face such as same-sex marriage, healthcare and insurance policy, and immigration reform, have deep constitutional roots. Amendments are crucial because they give us a mechanism to update and reflect changes in time and public opinion. The process of amending the Constitution fulfills a crucial part of the checks and balance system of......

Words: 1686 - Pages: 7

Free Essay

Wk 6 Assignment Paper

...Professor Refi Raza JP Morgan Amends Interim Financial Statements The company chosen for review, based on their amendment to a Financial Statement, was JP Morgan Chase (JPM). After considerable review, JPM announced on 13 July 2012 they would amend their first quarter 2012 interim Financial Statements. When JPM first published their interim Financial Statements for the first quarter the method they used for valuation was within the allowable limits. However, they discovered that the integrity in which the traders within Chief Investment Office (CIO) marked the positions of synthetic credit portfolios was questionable. It appears that the valuations may not indicate an accurate reflection of the total losses within their portfolios. Given that the total losses may not be reflected correctly, JPM decided to amend their interim Financial Statements for the first quarter. While the article did not explicitly state which accounting principle was used to arrive at their decision, this writer, using their accounting knowledge, surmises the Full Disclosure Principle was the reason JPM decided to amend their interim Financial Statements for the first quarter. JPM could have left their first quarter Financial Statements alone since it did not affect their total earnings or revenues for that portion of the year. Since JPM’s total earnings and revenues for the first quarter were not changed, they could have chosen to wait until the end of the year to see if the valuation......

Words: 802 - Pages: 4