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Reiss R and R

In: Business and Management

Submitted By MrZa
Words 639
Pages 3
Defining customers as those people and organizations for whom R&R creates value, R&R serves the following customers: 1. TV Guide; 2. American board game players, i.e. adults and children; 3. Retail outlets, which can be classified as mass merchandisers and department/gift stores; 4. The game developer, i.e. ‘a professional inventor’; 5. TV guide employees who develop the questions; 6. Sam Kaplan; 7. Sales representatives; 8. Kaplan’s supplier; 9. Swiss Colony; 10. Heller Factoring. Arguably, TV guide is a supplier/ marketing channel/ licensor, yet R&R creates value for TV Guide in the sense of creating a business opportunity. A similar argument holds for the other customers of R&R as well. If we look at the final consumers of the product, then according to the definition of Osterwalder and Pigneur, R&R serves a mass market. Taking into consideration the remarks of Mr. Reiss, who mentions that his customers are the manufacturers representatives and the buyers of major chains, we can argue that he distinguishes between input and output in his firm. Thus making the business model multi sided, the suppliers need many retail outlets to have their products for sale; and vice versa: the retail outlets require large production.
The value proposition describes what value is delivered to the customer. Or, to be more precise, what are the bundles of products and services that create value for R&Rs customers. Given the limited space of 1 page, I will stick to the customers defined by Mr. Reiss here. First, the manufacturers reps derive value from the business opportunity offered by R&R: they gain work experience and have the opportunity to share in the profits via commissions. Furthermore, Mr Reiss claims to pay on time and does not ‘shave’ the commissions and as such he developed a loyal workforce. Hence, the value proposition to the manufacturers reps comprises an improved...

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