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Relativist

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By sarah871
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Part A:
Explain what it means in ethics to call a theory relativist? [25 marks]

In this essay I will include what it means in ethics to call a theory relativist. Relativism is when people don’t always agree about what's right and what's wrong, this means there is no need to interfere whether its wrong or right. This suggests it has different cultures express different codes of conduct. Subjective links to relativism because it is when your dependent on some types of emotion or thoughts, Subjective is internal also it is about what you think about something. Theological is the final outcome and what comes out of it this is important in normative terms; some philosophers believe that the end is not how you achieve it is mainly about the outcome. Cultural relativism is an individual belief and activities should be understood an individuals own culture. It is the sort of approach which leads people to say things, 'When in Rome, do as the Romans do'. For example the Maassai Tribe drink the blood of their animals to get important nutrients for their bodies, although they are careful not to kill the cattle, as their wealth is measured in the number of animals they keep. This suggests they are not doing anything wrong according to culture relativism because they are following their traditions, they believe that they are not doing wrong as they are following society's morals. Also different cultures should respect each other cultures, for example in Islam some women may choose to wear a scarf but some people may criticize why women are wearing a scar for If your in a strict Islamic country, the women are right to cover themselves. In a western country, the women are right to expose more skin. And many things have changed over time it has become a multicultural society as it gives equal measures to the different ethnic and religious groupings. Whereas Jeffery Dahmer...

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