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Rhetorical Analysis Of Night By Elie Wiesel

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How many times must man perform the same mistakes until the lesson is learned? Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel speaks of the importance of sharing his story and others alike to demonstrate to people an event in which he and millions of others lost so much to never happen again. Wiesel speaks of “those moments that murdered [his] God” as he pushes to survive and realizes he will no longer be the same boy as before but a man willing to persevere through the camps without religion to guide him and emphasizes the loss he feels in the camps (Wiesel 34). As Elie Wiesel documents his experience of the Holocaust in his memoir Night, he uses rhetorical questions to demonstrate how the belief in God is challenged, and ultimately lost, during times of tremendous suffering.
At the arrival of the first camp, …show more content…
When Elie and his father arrive at Birkenau and they first see the crematoriums, the realization sinks in that they are not going to be a concern for the officers and Elie begins to think “Why should I sanctify His name?...What was there to thank Him for?” (33). The repeated questioning of Elie’s position with God and what God has done for him emphasizes how early at the camps he sees bodies being destroyed. The early questioning of faith sets a foundation for the diminished belief in God and as the tragedies increase, the doubting of faith deepens to a complete loss. However, the Elie is not the only one losing the grip on God in his life. After seeing the pipel, a young apprentice whom everyone in the camp loves, being hanged, Elie and the other prisoners begin questioning “Where is merciful God, where is He?” (64). The stating of the other prisoners

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