Free Essay

Roadmap to the Development Process of Toyota Prius

In: Business and Management

Submitted By AnnB
Words 1053
Pages 5
Toyota Hybrid cars.
Toyota Motor Corporation is a famous Japanese multinational corporation, and is considered the world’s second largest automaker of automobiles, trucks, buses, robots, and providing financial services.
When Toyota and other Japanese carmakers entered the American market, they were not considered as a threat to the American auto industry because it was believed their cars had no appeal to American consumers
However, in the 1970s, due to several problems like environmental regulations, and quality control issues with American cars, a good number of American car owners began searching for alternatives to poorly made American cars. In response to these changes, Toyota and other Japanese carmakers aggressively marketed their cars to Americans as being fuel-efficient, environmentally friendly, and having better build quality than American cars. In addition, Toyota marketed their cars with commercials involving young Toyota drivers jumping in the air. As a result, the Japanese’s marketing campaign along with continuing problems from the Big Three auto manufacturers, allowed import cars to make up about 20 percent of the US car market by 1980.
Stage1
General Motors, Ford and Daimler-Chrysler focused in the late 1990s on mergers and acquisitions for improving their business positions to meet future challenges. Toyota, meanwhile, centered its business strategy on technological innovation and persistent environmental product development.
The price of oil was not especially high during the 1990s when Toyota started its hybrid car program. Oil prices were below US $20 barrel in 1994 and were to fall to a 50-year low around 1997 when the Toyota Prius was first sold in Japan. Clearly something else was driving Toyota and other Japanese companies to invest so heavily in hybrid car development.

There are three probable reasons:
1 .High petrol taxes in Japan, due to the Japanese government wanting to reduce the dependence of Japan on imported oil. While this would have certainly driven the Japanese development of hybrid cars, petrol was cheap in the key US market at this time.
2) The potential to gain a market advantage by developing the key technologies required to successfully commercialize hybrid cars, and then owning these developments via patents.
3) The expectation that ownership of these key fuel savings technologies would become very valuable when world oil prices rise from the lows of the mid-1990s, which was a fair long-term assumption to make during this period.
Stage2:
Decision Making Process:
In 1994, the executive team acknowledged the potential threat of depleting oil reserves and climate change and change their strategy or products to meet the needs of future customers.
Course of Action:
Toyota set up a group tasked with meeting the challenge of creating a vehicle for the 21st century, which would work within the parameters of natural resource constraints and environmental issues.
Commitment to course of action: Toyota pioneered the concept of Hybrid (petrol/electric) technology to mass produce the world’s first eco-efficient vehicle, the Toyota Prius.

Evaluation of decision/re-engineering: The first prototype of the car had even faced starting problem. It took almost six months to roll the car. Finally, when the car started, it moved for a few yards only. It was hard to imagine that Toyota, which was known for its efficient production systems, was facing such trouble. Initially it felt that ‘Prius’ was a case of technological problems, impossible demands and multiple miscalculations. It proved how a great company could overcome obstacles and turn a dream into reality. Though ‘Prius’ represented only a small fraction of the nine million cars and trucks that the Japanese company planned to produce in 2006, it would be the first vehicle to provide a serious alternative to internal combustion engines, designed for a world of scarce oil and was branded as ‘The car for the future’.

Stage3:
Toyota carefully studied the US market and sees there is a growing oil crisis and foresees a need for change in the structure for cars, converting their needs to oil saving cars. While American car manufactures lacked producing such cars, then Toyota caught that opportunity and tried to occupy this niche market.
By 2002, it was being sold in North America, Japan, Europe, Hong Kong, Australia and Singapore. Analysts opined that the demand for hybrid cars would rise because of the unstable oil prices and the growing need for environment friendly products.
Post Evaluation
By examining the external environment and acknowledging the potential threats of depleting resources and increased concern over environmental issues, Toyota have turned a threat into a business opportunity, boosting their reputation both as an environmentally conscious and as technological innovators and established themselves as leaders in this growing market. The car industry faces many complex issues, but the introduction of the Prius provided Toyota with a competitive advantage.

RoadMap to the development Process of Toyota Prius

Stage1 | Stage2 | Stage3 | Executive level | 1 Expressed concern about the future of the automobile2.Embarked a new project called G21 to the team3.Communicated the vision and priorities to the team | 1.The executive team acknowledged the potential threat of depleting oil2.Challenged the team for the innovation of new model using new technology | 1. Toyota unveiled the Prius in Japan in October 1997, two months ahead of schedule.2.Made strategy plans for introducing cars to US and other prospective continents | Management and Team level | 1.Engaged in improving the existing internal combustion engine technology2.Started making refinements to the existing technology | 1. Team committed to the course of action using hybrid technology.2. Came up with around 80 alternatives.3. Identified numerous problems -- heat, reliability, noise, and cost.4. Narrowed the list to four models.5. After endless fussing and tweaking, the team finally reached 66 miles per gallon -- the 100% mileage improvement. | 1. Team has started putting efforts towards with second and third generation Prius.2. Redesigned the model for making it more appealing to the consumers. | Marketing /Sales Team | 1. Identification of the growing oil prices.2. Identification of Growing middle class around the world. | 1. Raised the concern that Premium price for the hybrid would make it impossible to sell.2. Challenged with building consumer technology awareness. | 1. Devised new marketing ways to cut down dealership costs in US.2.Devised new ways to boost the sales through internet, relied on grass-roots marketing, and public relations events |

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Fordism

...decline of the U.S. motor vehicle industry Ronald Jean Degen Ph.D. Candidate at the International School of Management Paris Vice Chairman of Masisa Chile Address: E-mail: rjdegen@gmail.com Phone: +55 21 8068 9000 Av. Pasteur 333 Botafogo/Urca Lancha Ovelha Negra Iate Clube do Rio de Janeiro 22290-240 Rio de Janeiro, RJ Brazil 3 Fordism and Taylorism are responsible for the early success and recent decline of the U.S. motor vehicle industry Abstract This paper identifies the ways in which the ideas of Fordism and Taylorism have been responsible for the success of the U.S. motor vehicle companies until 1955, and for their subsequent decline. On three occasions, the motor vehicle industry has changed the fundamental ideas on the process of manufacturing, and, perhaps more significantly, on how humans work together to create value. Under Fordism and Taylorism, the conditions of employment at the assembly lines became less and less bearable for the workers, and this resulted in an ongoing confrontation between management and the workforce, led by United Auto Workers (UAW). This confrontation resulted in escalating labor costs for the U.S. motor vehicle companies, and undermined their capacity to compete with the Japanese motor...

Words: 8511 - Pages: 35

Premium Essay

Report on Tesla Motors

...Investment Highlights GreenTech: Tesla Motors Poster Child for Green Mobility NeXt Up! www.nextupresearch.com With over 1063 Roadsters sold, Tesla, in our view, is the first to achieve commercial scale in sale of high performance electric cars. Our model assumes only sales of 4200 Model S (to be launched in 2012) cars even in 2015, which could prove conservative given Tesla‟s expectations for 20k cars a year. We note that Tesla has booked over 2200 orders for Model S. We expect the NUMMI plant (with a theoretical capacity of 400k cars) in Fremont to give the company ability to expand production at low capital cost. We expect Daimler and Toyota to provide for high recurring revenues in terms of powertrain sales. Unlike many of its competitors, Tesla has developed its own battery pack. We note that battery packs account for 30 – 40% of a car‟s cost, offering Tesla significant advantages as it scales. The company should be able to offer multiple models (such as SUV, minivans, sedans) based off the same platform without having to make significant R&D investment. June 29, 2010 Our valuation of $1.74 - $1.88B reflects stronger OEM sales offset by weaker Roadster revenues. Our revised per share price of $17.01 to $18.37 reflects the recent 3 to 1 reverse stock split and additional shares from the public offering. We note that the IPO (on 6/29/10) is priced at $17 per share. Investment Concerns The cost of ownership for Tesla Roadster is significantly higher than......

Words: 13496 - Pages: 54

Premium Essay

Indian Automobile Sector 2012

...THE INDIAN AUTOMOBILE SECTOR- HPL PROJECT Introduction The term automotive was created from Greek autos (self), and Latin motivus (of motion) to represent any form of self-powered vehicle. The Indian automotive industry has emerged as a 'sunrise sector' in the Indian economy. India is emerging as one of the world's fastest growing passenger car markets and second largest two wheeler manufacturer. It is also home for the largest motor cycle manufacturer and fifth largest commercial vehicle manufacturer. The automotive industry in India is one of the largest in the world and one of the fastest growing globally. India's passenger car and commercial vehicle manufacturing industry is the sixth largest in the world, with an annual production of more than 3.9 million units in 2011.[1] According to recent reports, India overtook Brazil and became the sixth largest passenger vehicle producer in the world (beating such old and new auto makers as Belgium, United Kingdom, Italy, Canada, Mexico, Russia, Spain, France, Brazil), growing 16 to 18 per cent to sell around three million units in the course of 2011-12.[2] In 2009, India emerged as Asia's fourth largest exporter of passenger cars, behind Japan, South Korea, and Thailand.[3] In 2010, India beat Thailand to become Asia's third largest exporter of passenger cars. As of 2010, India is home to 40 million passenger vehicles. More than 3.7 million automotive vehicles were produced in India in 2010 (an increase of 33.9%), making......

Words: 6888 - Pages: 28

Free Essay

Momentum Effect

...P A R T I Discovering Momentum 1 1 The Power of Momentum Where’s the Impetus? Momentum. Most businesses get it at some point: the impression that everything they undertake succeeds effortlessly, as if they’re being carried along by a tailwind that increases their efficiency and propels them on to exceptional growth.1 Some hold on to it. Most don’t. Slowly, imperceptibly, the tailwind turns around and the momentum disappears, without anyone quite realizing what has happened. The company is still growing, but not as strongly as before, not as efficiently. Everyone’s maxing out, but it seems like there’s molasses in the works. Sound familiar? Sooner or later, it hits you in the face. Imagine you are meeting up with a senior analyst whose opinion counts with some of your company’s biggest investors. You think you’re on safe ground—after all, your company is doing better than the competition. But the analyst is in full gimlet-eyed, illusion-killing mode. “That’s nothing to crow about,” she says. “Yeah, you’ve got reasonable growth, but it’s nothing exceptional. You’re a safe bet, nothing more. Okay, I might tell my mom to buy, but 3 The Momentum Effect then she’s happy with inflation plus one. The way we see it, you’re really grinding it out. We reckon the strain’s getting harder, too. There’s no impetus—no momentum.” Words like that can really take the gloss off a day. The next time you gather your team, you don’t congratulate them on beating their......

Words: 104474 - Pages: 418

Premium Essay

Jerry York and Gm

...with tangible and substantial financial benefit in addition to improved risk mitigation and brand value. Additionally, the team found that these recommendations are viable within GM’s corporate structure and can generate systemic benefits throughout the company. Thank you to our client, David Tulauskas, and our advisor, Professor Thomas Gladwin. Executive Summary 4 Introduction 6 Client GM Corporate Overview 7 Sustainability & General Motors Sustinability & the Auto Industry Green Ranking Systems 14 Competitor Trends 17 About the Project Proposal & Opportunities Scoping 26 22 Contents 11 Research GM Interviews 28 Conferences 31 Corporate Trends & Innovations Regulations & Legislative Activity Recommendations Recommendation Development Carbon Monetization 39 Sustainable Supply Chain Strategy 32 35 36 42 Supporting Statements Support for Recommendations 45 Supporting Statements and Analysis Framework 48 #1: Reduce GM’s exposure to the financial risks associated with carbon regulations 49 #2: Mitigate operational risk in resource-constrained and/or highly polluted geographies such as China #3: Reduce exposure to electricity cost increases and generate revenue from renewable energy credits #4: Mitigate financial risk...

Words: 38081 - Pages: 153

Free Essay

Carbon Strategies

...Corporate Carbon Strategies Threats and opportunities arising from the new energy imperative Reference Code: BI00036-019 Publication Date: March 2011 1 About the authors Professor Merlin Stone Merlin is Head of Research at The Customer Framework. He is author or co-author of many articles and thirty books and also on the editorial advisory boards of several academic journals. He has a first class honors degree and doctorate in economics from Sussex University, UK. In parallel to his business career, he has also pursued a full academic career, holding senior posts at various universities. He is now a visiting professor at De Montfort, Oxford Brookes and Portsmouth Universities, teaches economics for the Open University and marketing for Exeter University. Jane Fae Ozimek The author is a writer and researcher in the areas of IT, Business and the Law. Jane is currently editor of the Journal of Database Marketing and has previously published works on the use of statistics in business and Marketing Resource Management. Recent research papers include publications on the misuse of security protocols by major corporations, and a re-evaluation of the Loyalty Ladder concept in marketing theory. Jane was also co-author of the recently published Carbon Trading and the Effect of the Copenhagen Agreement (published by Business Insights, 2010). 2 Disclaimer Copyright © 2011 Business Insights Ltd This report is published by Business Insights (the Publisher). This......

Words: 48747 - Pages: 195

Premium Essay

Interbrand-Best-Global-Brands-2013-Report

...Best Global Brands 2013 Table of Contents JEZ Leadership is evolving. It must now be shared. CEOs, CMOs, and consumers all have the power to drive brand value. Brands are where business strategy meets reality. GINNI The New Rules of Brand Leadership 2 From Information to Intelligence 82 Best Global Brands 2013 Sector Leadership 86 BISH 10 Creative Leadership 70 Methodology 120 China’s New Brand Leaders 74 Contributors 126 Corporate Citizenship 2.0 78 MARK CHIEKO The New Rules of Brand Leadership By Jez Frampton In our globalized, hyperconnected age, one question persists in boardrooms, corner offices, business schools, and conferences all over the world: What is leadership and how has it changed in the 21st century? Driven by rapid technological advancement, the digitization of nearly everything, and the ever more intricate interdependencies of the global market, the business landscape has transformed over the past two decades. Operating in a bewildering new environment in which little is certain, the pace is quicker and the dynamics more complex. Those who lead today’s brands can no longer rely on once immutable truths or principles of leadership honored in times past. It is a new world. And as purchasing increasingly shifts from a physical experience to a virtual one and transaction-based interactions between brands and consumers shift to relationship-based interactions, new skills and sensibilities are needed.......

Words: 44812 - Pages: 180

Premium Essay

Global Brand

...Best Global Brands 2013 Table of Contents JEZ Leadership is evolving. It must now be shared. CEOs, CMOs, and consumers all have the power to drive brand value. Brands are where business strategy meets reality. GINNI The New Rules of Brand Leadership 2 From Information to Intelligence 82 Sector Leadership Best Global Brands 2013 10 86 BISH Methodology Creative Leadership 70 120 Contributors China’s New Brand Leaders 74 126 Corporate Citizenship 2.0 78 MARK CHIEKO The New Rules of Brand Leadership By Jez Frampton In our globalized, hyperconnected age, one question persists in boardrooms, corner offices, business schools, and conferences all over the world: What is leadership and how has it changed in the 21st century? Driven by rapid technological advancement, the digitization of nearly everything, and the ever more intricate interdependencies of the global market, the business landscape has transformed over the past two decades. Operating in a bewildering new environment in which little is certain, the pace is quicker and the dynamics more complex. Those who lead today’s brands can no longer rely on once immutable truths or principles of leadership honored in times past. It is a new world. And as purchasing increasingly shifts from a physical experience to a virtual one and transaction-based interactions between brands and consumers shift to relationship-based interactions, new skills and sensibilities are needed. Leadership......

Words: 44781 - Pages: 180

Premium Essay

Strategy Management

...CONNECT FEATURES Interactive Applications Interactive Applications offer a variety of automatically graded exercises that require students to apply key concepts. Whether the assignment includes a click and drag, video case, or decision generator, these applications provide instant feedback and progress tracking for students and detailed results for the instructor. Case Exercises The Connect platform also includes author-developed case exercises for all 12 cases in this edition that require students to work through answers to assignment questions for each case. These exercises have multiple components and can include: calculating assorted financial ratios to assess a company’s financial performance and balance sheet strength, identifying a company’s strategy, doing five-forces and driving-forces analysis, doing a SWOT analysis, and recommending actions to improve company performance. The content of these case exercises is tailored to match the circumstances presented in each case, calling upon students to do whatever strategic thinking and strategic analysis is called for to arrive at a pragmatic, analysis-based action recommendation for improving company performance. eBook Connect Plus includes a media-rich eBook that allows you to share your notes with your students. Your students can insert and review their own notes, highlight the text, search for specific information, and interact with media resources. Using an eBook with Connect Plus gives......

Words: 219639 - Pages: 879

Premium Essay

Marketing

...MARKETING 7E People real Choices This page intentionally left blank MARKETING 7E People real Choices Michael R. SAINT JOSEPH S SOLOMON ’ U OLLINS NIVERSITY Greg W. MARSHALL R C OLLEGE Elnora W. THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UPSTATE STUART Prentice Hall Boston Columbus Indianapolis New York San Francisco Upper Saddle River Amsterdam Cape Town Dubai London Madrid Milan Munich Paris Montreal Toronto Delhi Mexico City Sao Paulo Sydney Hong Kong Seoul Singapore Taipei Tokyo Editorial Director: Sally Yagan Editor in Chief: Eric Svendsen Acquisitions Editor: Melissa Sabella Director of Editorial Services: Ashley Santora Editorial Project Manager: Kierra Bloom Editorial Assistant: Elisabeth Scarpa Director of Marketing: Patrice Lumumba Jones Senior Marketing Manager: Anne Fahlgren Marketing Assistant: Melinda Jensen Senior Managing Editor: Judy Leale Project Manager: Becca Richter Senior Operations Supervisor: Arnold Vila Creative Director: Jon Christiana Senior Art Director: Blair Brown Text and Cover Designer: Blair Brown Media Project Manager, Production: Lisa Rinaldi Media Project Manager, Editorial: Denise Vaughn Full-Service Project Management: S4Carlisle Publishing Services Composition: S4Carlisle Publishing Services Printer/Bindery: Courier/Kendalville Cover Printer: Courier/Kendalville Text Font: Palatino Credits and acknowledgments borrowed from other sources and reproduced, with permission, in this textbook appear on appropriate page within text.......

Words: 160652 - Pages: 643

Premium Essay

Marketing

...MARKETING 7E People real Choices This page intentionally left blank MARKETING 7E People real Choices Michael R. SAINT JOSEPH S SOLOMON ’ U OLLINS NIVERSITY Greg W. MARSHALL R C OLLEGE Elnora W. THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UPSTATE STUART Prentice Hall Boston Columbus Indianapolis New York San Francisco Upper Saddle River Amsterdam Cape Town Dubai London Madrid Milan Munich Paris Montreal Toronto Delhi Mexico City Sao Paulo Sydney Hong Kong Seoul Singapore Taipei Tokyo Editorial Director: Sally Yagan Editor in Chief: Eric Svendsen Acquisitions Editor: Melissa Sabella Director of Editorial Services: Ashley Santora Editorial Project Manager: Kierra Bloom Editorial Assistant: Elisabeth Scarpa Director of Marketing: Patrice Lumumba Jones Senior Marketing Manager: Anne Fahlgren Marketing Assistant: Melinda Jensen Senior Managing Editor: Judy Leale Project Manager: Becca Richter Senior Operations Supervisor: Arnold Vila Creative Director: Jon Christiana Senior Art Director: Blair Brown Text and Cover Designer: Blair Brown Media Project Manager, Production: Lisa Rinaldi Media Project Manager, Editorial: Denise Vaughn Full-Service Project Management: S4Carlisle Publishing Services Composition: S4Carlisle Publishing Services Printer/Bindery: Courier/Kendalville Cover Printer: Courier/Kendalville Text Font: Palatino Credits and acknowledgments borrowed from other sources and reproduced, with permission, in this textbook appear on appropriate page within text.......

Words: 160652 - Pages: 643

Premium Essay

Marketing Real People, Real Choices

...c MARKETING 7E People real Choices This page intentionally left blank MARKETING 7E People real Choices Michael R. SAINT JOSEPH S SOLOMON ’ U OLLINS NIVERSITY Greg W. MARSHALL R C STUART OLLEGE Elnora W. THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA UPSTATE Prentice Hall Boston Columbus Indianapolis New York San Francisco Upper Saddle River Amsterdam Cape Town Dubai London Madrid Milan Munich Paris Montreal Toronto Delhi Mexico City Sao Paulo Sydney Hong Kong Seoul Singapore Taipei Tokyo Editorial Director: Sally Yagan Editor in Chief: Eric Svendsen Acquisitions Editor: Melissa Sabella Director of Editorial Services: Ashley Santora Editorial Project Manager: Kierra Bloom Editorial Assistant: Elisabeth Scarpa Director of Marketing: Patrice Lumumba Jones Senior Marketing Manager: Anne Fahlgren Marketing Assistant: Melinda Jensen Senior Managing Editor: Judy Leale Project Manager: Becca Richter Senior Operations Supervisor: Arnold Vila Creative Director: Jon Christiana Senior Art Director: Blair Brown Text and Cover Designer: Blair Brown Media Project Manager, Production: Lisa Rinaldi Media Project Manager, Editorial: Denise Vaughn Full-Service Project Management: S4Carlisle Publishing Services Composition: S4Carlisle Publishing Services Printer/Bindery: Courier/Kendalville Cover Printer: Courier/Kendalville Text Font: Palatino Credits and acknowledgments borrowed from other sources and reproduced, with permission, in this......

Words: 227255 - Pages: 910

Free Essay

Disruptive Technology

...McKinsey Global Institute May 2013 Disruptive technologies: Advances that will transform life, business, and the global economy The McKinsey Global Institute The McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), the business and economics research arm of McKinsey & Company, was established in 1990 to develop a deeper understanding of the evolving global economy. Our goal is to provide leaders in the commercial, public, and social sectors with the facts and insights on which to base management and policy decisions. MGI research combines the disciplines of economics and management, employing the analytical tools of economics with the insights of business leaders. Our “micro-to-macro” methodology examines microeconomic industry trends to better understand the broad macroeconomic forces affecting business strategy and public policy. MGI’s in-depth reports have covered more than 20 countries and 30 industries. Current research focuses on four themes: productivity and growth, the evolution of global financial markets, the economic impact of technology and innovation, and urbanization. Recent reports have assessed job creation, resource productivity, cities of the future, and the impact of the Internet. MGI is led by McKinsey & Company directors Richard Dobbs and James Manyika. Yougang Chen, Michael Chui, Susan Lund, and Jaana Remes serve as MGI principals. Project teams are led by a group of senior fellows and include consultants from McKinsey’s offices around the world. These teams draw...

Words: 80396 - Pages: 322

Premium Essay

Six Sigma

...and Supply; Transaction; Major Marketing Management Philosophy; Social Marketing Marketing Environment - Internal & External Marketing Environment Forces; Macro Environment; Micro and Internal Environment; Factors Influencing Consumer Buyer Behavior; Buyer Decision Process; Inputs for Buying Decision Process; Consumer Trends; Market Segmentation Process. Developing Market Strategies and the Offerings Part –I Positioning and Differentiation: Concept, Positioning according to Ries and Trout, Various Tools of Differentiation; Product Decisions and Strategies; Product Mix; Product Life Cycle; Brand Positioning; Brand Identity; Equity and Packaging. Developing Market Strategies and the Offerings - Part II: Introduction to Service Marketing; Differentiating Services; Product and Service Price; Response to Change in Price; Pricing Strategies. Delivering Marketing Programs – Part I Marketing through Channel Partners; Wholesalers and Retailers: Current Trend; Channel Management. Delivering Marketing Programs – Part II Market Communication, Process for Effective Communication; Advertising; Different Advertising Media; Sales Promotion; Public Relations; Direct Marketing; Personal Selling: Concepts and Process; Management of Sales Force Suggested Reading: 1. Marketing Management by Kotler Philip; Publisher: Prentice-Hall of India 2. Marketing Management by Ramaswamy V S and Namakumari; Publisher: S Macmillan India Ltd. 3. Marketing Management by Saxena Rajan;......

Words: 96487 - Pages: 386