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Role of Rcc in Socio Economic Development

In: Business and Management

Submitted By albertrobbin
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Pages 44
Introduction
Rajshahi is the largest city in the northern part of Bangladesh. It stands by side of Padma. Rajshahi was known an important business place for a long time ago and the river played a significant role to transport. Padma lost its fierceness day by day due to farakka damp and other reasons. But Rajshahi city still contains its own glory. In the British era and, before and after the liberation war of Bangladesh, the contribution of the people of Rajshahi is remarkable. The famous historian Sir Jadunath Sarker, Khan Bahadur Emaduddin, Madar Bux, Dr. Samsujjhoha, A.H.M. Kamaruzzaman and many others played a crucial role for the betterment of the people of this area as well as the country. Rajshahi was very important from a long time ago due to geographical, political, economic, educational reason and others. It was first declared as district town in 1825 in the British era, and in the then time it was known as Rampur-Bowalia. It was a famous trade port. The Rampur-Bowalia Municipal Town Committee was formed in 1869. The Municipality started from 1st April in 1876. After passing a long time now we have Rajshahi City Corporation, started its journey in 1987. In the min time a lots of things have been changed but the objective remain the same. Rajshahi City Corporation is trying heart and soul for the socio-economic development of the people which was started in 1876.
The corporation is an autonomous body which is operated by the elected people. The head of the organization is titled ‘Mayor’ who is directly elected by the people and the other elected people are known as ‘Councilor’. The corporation officials coordinate the elected people to implement the decision made by the council. City Corporation is a part of local government. Article 59 & 60 of our constitution has an outline of a local govt. system with elected representatives facilitating effective participation the people for each unit of administration. In compliance with the Constitutional requirement and to institutionalize the democratic aspirations in all walks of life it is obligatory to ensure the operation of effective local government organizations.

Local Government:
Local government is a form of public administration which in a majority of contexts, exists as the lowest tier of administration within the given state. The term is used to contrast with offices at state level, which are referred to as the central government, national government. Local governments generally acts within powers delegated to it by legislation or directives of the higher level of government.

Local Government in Bangladesh:
Strengthening local government body is the cherished goal of the people. The demands for democracy and local govt. have always moved in tandem. The representatives of a local body based on democratic ideas can promote the interest of the people. It is essential to establish local govt. bodies at each level of administration with elected representative.
The history of local government in Bangladesh shows that local bodies have been established at different levels in different periods Laws /Ordinances have been made to form local bodies at village, Thana, District and Divisional level from time to time. Since inception the local government institutions have undergone frequent changes in their functions and responsibilities.
The present structure of local government in Bangladesh had its origin in British colonial period. The first attempt at establishing local government institution was made during the latter part of the nineteenth century. The structure, functions and financial management of local government institutions have undergone many changes from the British colonial period to the present day.
During the British rule the Bengal village Chowkidari Act was passed in 1870 with administrative, economic and political objectives. This paved the way for setting up local government body under the law. Under this Act several villages were organized into a Union and Chowkidari Panchayet (Organization) was set up in each Union. The Chowkidari Panchayet had five members who were appointed by the government for three years .The Panchayets were responsible for appointment of Chowkidars ( village police) for maintenance of law and order. The village police were paid through collection of Chowkidari tax from the villagers.
During Pakistan period under the Basic Democracy Order of 1959 local government bodies were set up at four tires viz. Union Council at Union level, Thana Council at Thana level, District Council at District level and Divisional Council at Divisional level.
The Union Council was given 37 functions among which agriculture development, water supply, education, communications, and social welfare were included. The Union Council was also given the authority to set up conciliation court and the members were given judicial power under the Muslim Family and Marriage Ordinance of 1961. The Thana Council was constituted with public representatives and government functionaries. All the Union Council chairmen in a Thaha became the representative members while the Sub Divisional Officer and all Thana level officials were the official members of Thana Council.
District Council was constituted with official members and nominated members ,Half of the members of District Council were elected by the Chairman of Union Parishad and town Committees in the district The government appointed the remaining half. The Deputy Commissioner of the District became the ex-officio chairman of the District council. The functions of District Council included construction and maintenance of roads, and brides, building hospitals dispensaries, schools and educational institutions, health facilities and sanitation, tube well for drinking water, rest house and coordination of activities of Union Parishads within the District. The Divisional Council was constituted with government and private members, The Divisional Commissioner served as its chairman. Apart from coordinating the activities of the local government bodies within the Division it had no other fixed responsibility.
After Bangladesh became independent decision was taken to strengthen local government institutions at three levels and to make provision for women members. In 1982 Upazila Parishad was established as an elected local government body at Thana level. Earlier efforts at forming Gram Sarkar and Palli Parishad at village level did not succeed. The Upazila system introduced in 1982 was abolished in 1991. Since inception the local government institutions were given the responsibilities for maintenance of law and order infrastructures development and their maintenance, health, education etc. within their area. Though they had sources of own, revenue income foremost of their activities they mainly relied on various grants from the government. At present only Union Parishad in an elected local government body. There is no elected body at the Thana level and though Zilla Parishad is a local government at District level there is no elected body for their management.
The government is committed to establish strong local government institutions at various levels through active participation of the elected representatives in the administration as well as development activities. Local Government Division is implementing various development and service-oriented activities for poverty alleviation and to make the rural people's life more comfortable, sound and meaningful. The activities of the LGD are extended up to the grass-root level of the country. The Union Parishad, Upazila Parishad, Zila Parishad, Municipalities and City Corporations are the Local Government Institutions under this division. In addition, the Local Government Engineering Department (LGED), Department of Public Health Engineering (DPHE), Dhaka WASA, Chittagong WASA and NILG are the different Department /Directorate/Institutions of this Division. Through these Departments /Institutions, LGD is working to mobilize local resources, establish good governance at the local level, providing civic/utility services to the citizen of municipalities and city corporations, rural and urban infrastructures development (constructions of feeder road, box culvert, bridges, growth center for expansion of market facilities) supplying of safe drinking water, solid waste disposal and sanitation all over the country. LGD is also responsible for planning and implementation of development projects in the local level, conducting survey/research regarding local government and arranging training program for enhancing knowledge and efficiency of the elected representatives. These activities are directly and indirectly contributing in the national goal of socio-economic development through poverty reduction, human resource development and creating employment opportunities.

Local Government
Local Government

City Corporation
City Corporation
Municipality
Municipality
Zilla Parishad
Zilla Parishad
Upazila Parishad
Upazila Parishad
Union Parishad
Union Parishad

Background of Rajshahi City Corporation
Rajshahi city is situated at ancient Barind Area. In the northern part of Bangladesh, Rajshahi is the biggest Metropolitan City. At least 600 million years ago the Archaic land of Barind was originated. How long ago human being started to reside in this area is not clear to the historian. But one thing is clear that there was existence of Pundro Bardhawan state about 3000 years ago.
There was an old university named Sompur Bihar at Paharpur which is 100km away from the Rajshahi city. At 7th & 8th century this Bihar was the center of excellence of knowledge & education. Buddhists learner from China (Tibet) came over here for the education purpose. In middle age Gour was established as the capital of Bengal which is 90km from Rajshahi. Historic mosque named ‘Sona Mosjid’ bears the memento of that Capital. In the north there is a historic mosque titled ‘Kushumba Mosjid’ which is 30 km & another historic one is ‘Bagha Mosjid’ is 30 km at the east from Rajshahi representing the middle age heritage of this region.
At present the shrine of Hazrat Shah Mokhdum Ruposh (ra) is a remarkable one. In the 13th century this Dervish came & fought with local Mahakalghar King & owned the battle.
The city of Rajshahi is the largest city in the northern region of Bangladesh. Since 1947 the administrative works of Rajshahi Division started from here and so, the city got the status of divisional headquarter. The business of ‘Blue’ and ‘Silk’ led Rajshahi to start its journey as an urban center.
In 1825, during the British rule, this district town was switched over from Natore to Rajshahi. With the help of the then government and local Landlords various educational, charitable, social and cultural institutions and organizations started to be founded. In the year 1828, the first modern educational institute Boalia English School, which is now ‘Rajshahi Collegiate School’, was founded. It is believed that this is the first modern educational institute in Bangladesh. This is why Rajshahi is popularly known as the ‘City of Education.’
Rajshahi Municipality started its function in two tin shed rooms in Bhubon Mohon Park on 1st April, 1876. Later on it was shifted to a large room of the Rajshahi College. To run the activities of the municipality the first ‘Town Committee’ was formed. The Principal of Rajshahi College Mr. Har Govinda Sen was the ‘Chairman’ of the 7 member town committee. All the members were nominated by the government District Magistrate, Sub Divisional Officer (SDO) and Medical Officer were ex officio members. Later on the system of election was introduced. Chairman and Vice Chairman were elected. Most of the commissioners were elected by tax payers. As per 3rd clause of Municipal Act of 1884 a committee was formed comprising of 21 commissioners. When in 1921 the municipality building was founded by the side of Sona Dighi (a vast tank of sweet water), the municipal office was shifted there from Rajshahi College. In 1930, 8 municipal committees were formed for operating the municipal services smoothly. These committees separately operated and monitored the services of finance, public works, light, water supply, health and sanitation, education, appeal and the Sadar Hospital (Principal Hospital) founded by Raja P. N. Roy. The tenure of the committees was one year and the land area of the municipality was divided into 7 wards. In the year 1876 there was also a “Municipal Board” formed. As per the order of the Fundamental Democracy act of 1958, the then District Magistrate K.M.S. Rahman dissolved the Municipal Committee according to the government order. Until 18 February 1874, government officials acted as administrators of the municipality. After the liberation of Bangladesh the first ever elected Chairman took the charge of the municipality on 18 February, 1974. Later on, the status of the municipality was raised to City Corporation. In 1987, Rajshahi City Corporation started its operation by Rajshahi City Corporation Act 1987. As a result the area and the population also rose. At present the number of wards is 30. On 25 April 2002, city dwellers cast their votes and elected one Mayor, 30 Commissioners for 30 wards and 10 women for reserved women commissioners.
As per the government act, the title of Commissioner was changed to Councilor in 2008. Last election was held on 4 August, 2008 and one Mayor, thirty ward Councilors and ten women Councilors against the reserved seats were elected by the direct vote of the public. Newly elected Mayor A H M Khairuzzaman Liton and the Councilors were sworn in on 9 September 2008. The elected Mayor took the charge from the action Mayor Mr. Rezaun Nabi Dudu on 14 September 2008. Activities of the present body started working through a general meeting on 18 September 2008.
Rajshahi City Corporation is not divided into administrative regions. It is run centrally. But 30 ward councilors and ten women councilors have their separate offices. Activities of birtd registration, providing citizenship etc are done from these offices.
Getting the approval from the government on 13 November 1995, the foundation of the new building of City Corporation was laid down on 25 February 1997. Since 1 February 2003 all the official and administrative works are being operated from the new building.

Rajshahi City at a Glance 1. Location: Latitude- 22 N, Longitude- 42 E 2. Area: 96.72 Sq.km 3. Human Settlement: Nearly one thousand years ago. 4. Foundation of Modern City: Nearly three hundred & fifty years ago. 5. No. of Police Station: 4 Nos. (Boalia, Rajpara, ShaMokhdun and Motihar) 6. No. of Wards: 30 Nos. 7. No. of Locality: 134 Nos. 8. Population: Nearly 750000 9. Growth Rate: 4.19 10. Birth Rate: 20.90 11. Mortality Rate: 6.30 12. Infant Mortality Rate: 6.35 13. Average Life Expectancy: 67.7 years. 14. Climate: Sub-Tropical monsoon zone. 15. Temperature: Average temperature C Highest temperature C Lowest temperature C Rain fall 1159.9mm No. of rainy days- 99 days 16. No. of Primary School: 62 17. High School: 52 18. College: 20 19. University: 8 20. Medical College: 2 21. Technical Institute: 7 22. Poly-Technical Institute: 2 23. Per Capita Income: $690 24. National GDP: 5.88% 25. Literacy Rate: 71.22% 26. Establishment of Municipality: 1st April, 1876 27. Municipal Corporation: 13th August, 1987 28. Location of RCC: Nagor Vaban, Greater Road, Rajshahi 29. Man Power of RCC: 2425 30. No. of Holding: 46296 (Govt.- 276, Pvt.-46020) 31. Birth Registration: Started from 1997 32. No. of Mosque: 285 33. Temple: 45 34. Church: 4 35. Graveyard: 16 36. Cemetery: 2 37. Crematoriums: 2 38. Primary Hospital: 17 39. Park: 4 40. Police Box: 8 41. Market: 14 42. Ferry Ghat: 2 43. Monument: 8 44. Airport: 1 45. Railway Station: 3 46. Bus Terminal: 2 47. Truck Terminal: 1 48. Fire Service: 2 49. Stadium: 3 50. Women Sports Complex: 1 51. Tennis Complex: 1 52. Hotel Rest House: 34 53. Hospital: 16 54. Clinic: 48 55. Community Center: 9 56. Auditorium: 6 57. Local Dailies: 8 58. Press Club: 3 59. Public Library: 10 60. Sanitary Land Fill: 1 61. West Management Plant: 1 62. Incinerator: 1 63. Public Toilet: 11 64. Drainage: 117.78km 65. Roads: 560.00km 66. Garbage Volume: 350.00M.ton

Organizational Framework and Activities of RCC
Rajshahi City Corporation Organogram
Section 48 of Rajshahi City Corporation Act 1987 defines the organogram of the corporation. The following list is headed with serial number, name of the post, number of the post and comment.
Table 1: Mayor Office Sl no. | Name of the Post | No. of the post | Comment | 1 | Mayor/Administrator | 1 | Elected by people/ Appointed by govt. | 2 | Personal Secretary of Mayor/administrator | 1 | | 3 | Personal Assistant/ Typist | 1 | | 4 | M.L.S.S | 3 | |

Table 2: Chief Executive Officer Office Sl. No. | Name of Post | No. of Post | Comment | 1 | Chief Executive Officer | 1 | Govt. Deputation | 2 | Personal Assistant/ Typist | 1 | | 3 | M.L.S.S | 1 | | | Total | 3 | |

Table 3: Secretariat Department Sl. No. | Name of Post | No. of Post | Comment | 1 | Secretary | 1 | Govt. Deputation having 10 years’ experience / Promoted | 2 | Personal Assistant/ Typist | 1 | | 3 | M.L.S.S | 1 | | | Total | 3 | | General Administration Division | 1 | Deputy Secretary | 1 | | 2 | Assistant Secretary | 1 | | 3 | Chief Assistant | 1 | | 4 | Senior Assistant | 1 | | 5 | Record Keeper | 1 | | 6 | Junior Assistant | 12 | | 7 | Photocopy Machine Operator | 2 | | 8 | M.L.S.S. | 39 | | | Total | 91 | | Security Division | 1 | Supervisor (security) | 2 | | 2 | Guard | 30 | | 3 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 32 | | Public Relationship Division | 1 | Public Relationship Officer | 1 | | 2 | Junior Assistant/ Typist | 1 | | 3 | Cameraman and Assistant Public Relationship Officer | 1 | | 4 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 4 | | Law Division | 1 | Legal Advisor | 1 | Temporary | 2 | Junior Assistant/ Typist | 1 | | 3 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 3 | | Magistrate Division | 1 | Magistrate | 1 | Govt. Deputation | 2 | Bench Assistant | 1 | | 3 | Processor Server | 1 | | 4 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | 5 | Police | 35 | Deputation | | Total | 39 | | Property Division | 1 | Estate Officer | 1 | | 2 | Junior Assistant/ Typist | 1 | | 3 | Surveyor | 1 | | 4 | Chainman | 1 | | 5 | Collector | 2 | | 6 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 7 | | Mosque Division | 1 | Imam | 1 | | 2 | Muyajjin | 1 | | 3 | Khadem | 1 | | | Total | 3 | | Store Division | 1 | Store Officer | 1 | | 2 | Store Keeper | 1 | | 3 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 3 | |

Table 4: Account Department Sl. No. | Name of Post | No. of Post | Comment | 1 | Budget and Account Officer | 1 | Deputation/ Promoted after 5 years of service. | 2 | Accountant | 2 | | 3 | Assistant Accountant | 2 | | 4 | Assistant of Accountant | 8 | | 5 | Junior Assistant/ Typist | 2 | | 6 | Orderly peon | 1 | | 7 | M.L.S.S. | 3 | | | Total | 20 | | Cash Division | 1 | Treasurer | 1 | | 2 | Assistant Treasurer | 1 | | 3 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 3 | |

Table 5: Revenue Division Sl. No. | Name of Post | No. of Post | Comment | 1 | Chief Revenue Officer | 1 | Deputation/ Directly Promoted | 2 | Revenue Officer | 1 | | 3 | Typist/PA | 1 | | 4 | M.L.S.S. | 2 | | | Total | 5 | | Tax Collection | 1 | Taxation Officer | 1 | | 2 | Deputy Taxation Officer | 4 | | 3 | Senior Assistant | 2 | | 4 | Junior Assistant/ Typist | 15 | | 5 | Warrant Officer | 2 | | 6 | Collector | 45 | | 7 | M.L.S.S. | 10 | | | Total | 79 | |

Assessment Division | 1 | Chief Assessor | 1 | | 2 | Deputy Chief Assessor | 2 | | 3 | Assessor | 4 | | 4 | M.L.S.S. | 3 | | | Total | 10 | | Market Division | 1 | Taxation Officer (Market) | 1 | | 2 | Deputy Taxation Officer | 2 | | 3 | Assistant Bazar Caretaker | 1 | | 4 | Inspector | 4 | | 5 | Assistant | 1 | | 6 | Toll Collector | 14 | | 7 | M.L.S.S. | 3 | | | Total | 26 | | License Division | 1 | Taxation Officer (License) | 1 | | 2 | Junior Assistant/ Typist | 1 | | 3 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 3 | | Semi Vehicle Division | 1 | Deputy Taxation Officer (vehicle) | 1 | | 2 | Inspector | 2 | | 3 | Junior Assistant/ Typist | 1 | | 4 | Curt Seizer | 1 | | 5 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 6 | |

Commerce Division | 1 | Deputy Taxation Officer (Commerce) | 1 | | 2 | Inspector | 6 | | 3 | Junior Assistant/ Typist | 1 | | 4 | M.L.S.S. | 3 | | | Total | 11 | |

Table 6: Work Department Sl. No. | Name of Post | No. of Post | Comment | 1 | Super-in-tend Engineer | 1 | | 2 | Short Hand Writer | 1 | | 3 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 3 | | Development Division | 1 | Executive Engineer | 2 | | 2 | Assistant Engineer | 2 | | 3 | Sub-Assistant Engineer | 8 | | 4 | Estimator | 2 | | 5 | Draftsman | 1 | | 6 | Senior Assistant | 1 | | 7 | Treasure | 1 | | 8 | Junior Assistant & Typist | 2 | | 9 | Work Assistant | 14 | | 10 | Chainman | 2 | | 11 | M.L.S.S. | 5 | | 12 | Gardener | 3 | | | Total | 43 | | Planning Division | 1 | Assistant Engineer | 1 | | 2 | Research Officer/Sociologist | 1 | | 3 | Draftsman | 1 | | 4 | Treasure | 1 | | 5 | Surveyor | 1 | | 6 | Junior Assistant & Typist | 1 | | 7 | M.L.S.S. | 2 | | | Total | 8 | | Electrical Division | 1 | Assistant Engineer (Electric) | 1 | | 2 | Sub-Assistant Engineer | 2 | | 3 | Street Light Visitor | 2 | | 4 | Street Light Mechanic | 6 | | 5 | Main Switch Operator | 4 | | 6 | Street Light Helper | 12 | | 7 | M.L.S.S. | 2 | | | Total | 29 | | Transportation Division | 1 | Assistant Engineer (Mechanic) | 1 | | 2 | Super-in-tend of Transportation/Sub Assistant Engineer | 1 | | 3 | Senior Mechanic | 1 | | 4 | Junior Mechanic (Grade- A) | 1 | | 5 | Driver (Heavy) | 9 | | 6 | Junior Assistant & Typist | 1 | | 7 | Driver (Light) | 6 | | 8 | Mechanic Helper | 1 | | 9 | Welder | 1 | | 10 | Assistant Welder | 1 | | 11 | Trolley/ Garbage Van Mechanic | 1 | | 12 | Assistant Trolley | 1 | | 13 | Helper of Driver | 9 | | 14 | M.L.S.S. | 2 | | | Total | 36 | | Store Division | 1 | Store Keeper | 1 | | 2 | Assistant Store Keeper | 1 | | 3 | Labor | 2 | | | Total | 4 | |

Table 7: Conservancy Division Sl. No. | Name of Post | No. of Post | Comment | 1 | Chief Conservancy Officer | 1 | | 2 | Conservancy Officer (monitoring) | 1 | | 3 | Visitor | 4 | | 4 | Conservancy Supervisor | 15 | | 5 | Labor | 25 | | | Total | 43 | |

Table 8: Public Health Division: Sl. No | Name of Post | No. of Post | Comment | 1 | Chief Health officer | 1 | Govt. Deputation/ Appointed by Corporation | 2 | Short Hand Writer/Typist | 1 | | 3 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 3 | | Health Division | 1 | Health Officer | 2 | (One man & one woman) | 2 | Senior Assistant | 1 | | 3 | Junior Assistant & Typist | 2 | | 4 | M.L.S.S. | 3 | | | Total | 8 | | Sanitary / Family Planning Division | 1 | Senior Sanitary Visitor | 1 | | 2 | Sanitary Visitor | 2 | | 3 | Health Assistant | 60 | | 4 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 64 | | Mosquito Control Division | 1 | Visitor | 2 | | 2 | Supervisor | 10 | | 3 | Spray man | 30 | | 4 | Drain Cleaner | 30 | | 5 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 73 | |

Slaughter Division | 1 | Veterinary Surgeon | 1 | | 2 | Collector | 4 | | 3 | Molla | 4 | | 4 | Cleaner | 4 | | 5 | M.L.S.S. | 1 | | | Total | 14 | | Graveyards/Crematoriums | 1 | Caretaker | 15 | |

Table 9: Present Council of Rajshahi City Corporation Mayor | A.H.M. Khairuzzaman Liton |

Sl. no | Councilors | Ward | 1 | Most. Razia Sultana (Bizli) | Reserved 1 | 2 | Most. Rarzana Haque | Reserved 2 | 3 | Most. Muslima Begum Bely | Reserved 3 | 4 | Bilkis Banu | Reserved 4 | 5 | Most. Firoza Khatun | Reserved 5 | 6 | Mrst. Sufia Islam | Reserved 6 | 7 | Most. Kohinur Chowdhury | Reserved 7 | 8 | Most. Anwara Begum | Reserved 8 | 9 | Most. Nurunnahar Begum | Reserved 9 | 10 | Masuda Mallik | Reserved 10 | 11 | Monsur Rahman | Ward 1 | 12 | Md. Nomanul Islam | Ward 2 | 13 | Meraj Uddin | Ward 3 | 14 | Md. Sajjad Hossain | Ward 4 | 15 | Md. Kamrujjaman | Ward 5 | 16 | Md. Abul Hasnat | Ward 6 | 17 | Md. Abdul Jabbar Haji | Ward 7 | 18 | Md. Abdul Hamid | Ward 8 | 19 | Md. Moniruzzaman (Bablu) | Ward 9 | 20 | Siraj Uddin Ahmed (Manik) | Ward 10 | 21 | Md. Robiul Islam (Toju) | Ward 11 | 22 | Soriful Islam (Bab9) | Ward 12 | 23 | Md. Robiul Alam | Ward 13 | 24 | Md. Tutul | Ward 14 | 25 | Md. Abdus Sobahan (Liton) | Ward 15 | 26 | Belal Ahmmed | Ward 16 | 27 | Md. Shahadat Ali (Shahu) | Ward 17 | 28 | Md. Shahidul Islam | Ward 18 | 29 | Md. Nurujjaman (Tito) | Ward 19 | 30 | Mustak Hossain (Toton) | Ward 20 | 31 | Md. Nizam ul Azeem | Ward 21 | 32 | Abdul Hamid Sarkar (Tekon) | Ward 22 | 33 | Md. Bozlul Haque (Montu) | Ward 23 | 34 | Md. Jahangir Alom Alomgir | Ward 24 | 35 | Md. Akbar Hossain | Ward 25 | 36 | Md. Mokhleshur Rahman (Khalil) | Ward 26 | 37 | Md. Anwarul Amin (Azob) | Ward 27 | 38 | Md. Ansar Ali | Ward 28 | 39 | Md. Jaher Hossain (Saju) | Ward 29 | 40 | Md. Shahidul Islam (Pintu) | Ward 30 |

General Meeting (GM):
The General Meeting (GM) of the corporation is known as a mini parliament. In the first week of every month corporation arrange a meeting called GM. Section 49 of City Corporation Act’2009 defines all the requirements and procedure of GM. All the decisions are taken in GM by the consent of the number of majority councilors presented in GM. The honorable Mayor will be the president of GM. In absence of Mayor, Panel Mayor will act as the president. If Panel Mayor is also absent then one of the councilors, presented in the GM, act as the president. The corporation can invite the experts to get advice in any particular subject.
Standing Committee:
According to section 50(1) of City Corporation Act 2009, corporation has to form thirteen standing committees at the first general meeting of the corporation each year or as soon as possible. The duration of each standing committee is 2 years and 6 months. The standing committees are as follows I. Finance and Establishment committee. II. Waste Management committee. III. Education, Health and Family planning Committee. IV. Planning and Development Committee. V. Account Audit and Storing Committee. VI. Construction and Maintenance Committee. VII. Social Welfare and Community Center Committee. VIII. Environment Development Committee. IX. Sports and Cultural Committee. X. Birth and Death Registration Committee. XI. Communication Committee. XII. Price Level Monitoring and Controlling Committee. XIII. Natural Disaster Management Committee. These committees work with their respective subject. Generally, every committee stands for a meeting once or twice in every month. But it may depend on their activities. The main function of the standing committee is to evaluate its regular activities and to determine the future activities. Then it submits some recommendations to the General Meeting (GM). If GM realizes that those recommendations are essential for the corporation then GM pass those and corporation take necessary steps to implement the recommendations. Mayor and Councilor: Mayor is the chief of the corporation. He or she directly elected by the people of respective area. The number of councilors is fixed by the government as well as the reserved women councilors. The Mayor is responsible for all the activities of the corporation. He and his councilor work to fulfill the interest of the local people. Chief Executive Officer (CEO)
According to the section 62(1) of the City Corporation Act 2009, A CEO will be appointed by the government subject to some specific condition. He is liable to implement all the decision taken by the corporation and to direct the administration. The CEO is responsible for all his activities to the mayor. The activities of CEO are specified by the act. According to section 63, CEP is been given special power that implies if, accidently, any unexpected event occur then in absence of mayor he may take necessary steps. After that he has to report to the corporation as soon as possible. According to the section 64(1), (2), (3) and (4), CEO can participate in any meeting of the corporation. He can interpret any subject and mention legal status with the consent of the president in the meeting. He has no right to vote and raise any proposal. CEO is fully liable to store the proceedings of the meeting.

Secretary
According to the section 65(1) of the City Corporation Act 2009, there is a sectary of the corporation and he will be appointed by the government subject to some specific conditions. The main duty of a secretary is to coordinate CEO in the decision implementation and regular administrative activities. In absence of CEO, sectary will act as CEO of the corporation.

Activities of Secretariat Department
The Secretariat department is responsible for the following activities. 1. Maintaining general administrative work and establishment, law, regulations. 2. Protecting and maintaining the corporation property. 3. Public relation activities. 4. Educational, social and cultural activities.
Activities of Account Department
There are three major functions performed by account department. 1. Preparing Annual Budget. 2. Audits account and making reports. 3. Preserving records of debit and credit.

Activities of Revenue Department
Department of Revenue, the most important department in Rajshahi City Corporation responsible for revenue services great deals to collect the amount of revenue. The department has following 4 sections; 1. Tax Collection Section 2. Tax Enforce Section 3. License Section a. Sub-Section for Commerce b. Sub-Section for Transport 4. Market Section

Activities of Work Department:
The main functions of work department are making plans, implementing and preservation of all the infrastructure development and charity works.
Activities of Conservancy Department: There are two major functions performed by conservancy department. 1. Waste management. 2. Maintenance of drainage system.

Activities of Health Department: * Birth-Death Registration * Premises License Issue * Administer of City Hospitals * Offering health services for essential components of primary health care By City Health Centers * Raising public awareness of diseases.

Functions of Rajshahi City Corporation
In the City Corporation, major decisions are taken in the General Meeting where all the councilors and the honorable Mayor apply their voting power. Decisions taken by the house are implemented by the employees of the City Corporation. Also the Mayor of the Corporation, for the first time, introduced the system of taking opinions of community people before taking any project in that locality. Thus democracy is exercised in City Corporation to its gross root level. It runs diversified activities to develop socio-economic condition of the city. City Corporation normally executes the following functions: 1. Fixation of Taxes: Fixing holding taxes of residential and non-residential buildings. 2. Collection of Taxes: Collection of holding taxes. 3. Providing Licenses: a. Providing licenses of rickshaw, vans etc. b. Providing premises licenses. 4. Establishment, Reestablishment & Repairs: Roads, drains, culverts, sheds for the pedestrians, gates, police boxes, bazars, sculptures, premises, buildings etc. 5. Primary Health Care: c. Child health care. d. Mother’s health care. e. Expanded immunization program. f. Monitoring food and drinking water. g. Maintenance of slaughtering houses. h. Birth registration. i. Death registration. j. Controlling mosquito. k. Supervising graveyards and crematoriums. 6. Lighting of Roads: Supplying and maintaining different types of electric bulbs for the light post of all the roads of the city. 7. Conservancy Works: l. Cleaning drains, roads, septic tanks etc. m. Maintenance of dead animals. n. Killing of stray dogs. 8. City Health Program: o. Establishing community. p. Chalk out city programs. q. Observing different international days. r. Managements of the disposals of hospitals. 9. Emergency Services: s. Providing ambulance services. t. Collecting information of emergency services of city dwellers and providing assistance accordingly. 10. Social Activities: Establishing educational and religious institutions and giving them aids.

Vision 2018
The present council set up some projects to build Rajshahi economically strong and a digital city by coordinating with the present ICT Global Village. This is known as “Vision 2018”. This vision tells us after 2018 what will be the status of Rajshahi City Corporation. To carrying into effect Rajshahi City Corporation has under taken some projects. Work is going on with some of the projects and remaining are under process.

The Under Going & Under Process Projects Are:
Mid & Long Term Planning
To increase revenue income Markets, Hospitals, Educational Institutes will be built by RCC in collaboration with private entrepreneurs.
Gas & Electricity Sector * Arrangement of Gas supply facilities for household’s affairs and industrial purpose. * Completion of Greater Rajshahi Electrification project phase-02 & start of phase-03 for electrification of Rajshahi Metropoliton Area. * Modernization of road-light system. * To increase sufficient lighting system of the city Area. * More improvement of electrification system under the Ten-Town project.

Industrial Sector * Establishment of Agro-based EPZ at Rajshahi and increasing employment facilities at Rajshahi through completion of 2nd phase of jute mill & construction of another jute mill. * Reopening of Textile & Sericulture mills immediately. * Re-establishment of Katakhali Power Plant. * To establish Sericulture & Garment Villages. * Educational & Communicational Sector * Development of ICT System in all sectors. * To establish different types of technical institutes. * To Re-start British Council. * To establish English medium school of National Standard. * To establish IT facilities at different points of the City for the general people. * Construction of road from Fire Service Shopura to Rajshahi By-pass to connect North-South Region of the city. * Construction of road from Postal Academy Square to Rajshahi-Natore road to connect West-East touch region of the City. * Road widening & developing from Kadirgonj Najmul Haque Girl’s school to Sonadighi Square. * Road widening & developing from Hetem Kha Sader Hospital to Barnail Cinema Hall Square. * Road widening from Rajshahi Airport to Bindu Square Rail Crossimg. * Construction of connecting road from Vadra Rail Crossing to Rajshahi University Fire Station beside Rajshahi-Natore Highway. * Road widening & developing from Kalpana Cinema Hall to Talaimari Square. * Road widening & simplifying from Gorhanga Rail crossing to Zero Point.

Health Sector * Construction of more Maternity & Health centers for strengthening the health services. * To find out the entrepreneurs for constructing of cardiology hospital, multipurpose hospital, specialized child hospital & Diagnostic center of International Standard. * Implementation of integrated project for cleaning system of garbage to improve the overall environmental situation. * Computerized Birth & Death registration through Councilor Office.

Environmental Improvement & Plantation * Construction of required number recreational spots on the bank of the river Padma. * Construction of Eco-park on the bank of the river Padma. * Beautification o different squares of Rajshahi City Corporation. * Conservation of pond. * Registration of Hydrolic Horne in City Corporation area. * Registration of truck movement in City Corporation area at day time.

Games & Sports Sector * Arrangement of Mayor Gold Cup Football, Cricket, Volley ball tournament along with National and International sports program. * Construction of a stadium at the Western zone of the City.

Socio-Economic & Liberation War Monuments * Construction of super markets at different places of the City. * Construction of more slaughtering houses. * Construction of monuments for the Language Martyrs and Liberation War Martyrs.

Socio-Economic Development:
Socio-economic development represents a development process, within an area, which has the result of improving the standard of life of the community. In this process, the actors and the local institution try to utilize local resources for maximum efficiency. The goal of this strategy is to create new jobs and to improve the overall climate in the area.
This concept is supposed to be materialized in a real partnership between public and private sector involved in the process of socio-economic development. These actors should work in partnership with one another, mobilizing maximum resources and making a substantial impact in the local area.
The major objectives of local and economic development are economic prosperity and social well-being. These objectives can be reached by creating a favorable environment for concerning the problems for revitalizing their community.
Local socio-economic development has a local foundation. It needs a local decision making process with not too much interference from the national politics. This is the reason why the system has to become decentralized and the local authorities have to receive more power to at their level.
Local development should be based on local resources and on the activity of the business community. The more business there are in the area, the better local economy will do. So, the main task of the local authorities is to creat a good environment for doing business in the area.
The actors involved in the local socio-economic development are: 1. Local authorities with local and central representation, who are responsible for industrial activities, the environment, public works and transportation. 2. The representative of the economic activities, such as developers, private enterprises, banks and trade unions. 3. Educational institutions, such as: schools and universities. 4. Nongovernmental organizations. 5. Mass-media with an important role in educating the community.

Role of RCC in Socio-Economic Development of Rajshahi:
RCC is one of the local government institutions of Local Government Ministry. The local government is working to mobilize local resources, establish good governance at the local level, providing civic services to the citizen of municipalities and city corporations and rural area. The activities are directly and indirectly contributing in the national goal of socio-economic development through poverty reduction, human resource development and creating employment opportunities.
RCC has a vision to develop the socio-economic condition of rajshahi. There are some ongoing projects that will help to enhance the socio-economic condition. Here we use the Proposed and Actual Budget of the corporation from fiscal year 2008-2009 to 2011-2012 to describe the situation. On the basis of those statements we will evaluate the performance of RCC whether it attain its goal completely or partly or not.

Table 10: Income Budget for Fiscal Year 2008-09 Heads | Proposed | Actual | Percentage | Part 1: Revenue | 1. Tax | 107,029,890.00 | 65,962,387.00 | 61.63% | 2. Rates | 163,375,179.00 | 71,428,248.00 | 43.72% | 3. Fees | 8,375,000.00 | 5,350,844.00 | 63.89% | 4. Rent & Profits | 39,206,664.00 | 12,560,014.00 | 32.04% | 5. Donation(voluntary) | - | 170,000.00 | | 6. Miscellaneous | 6,065,000.00 | 6,364,230.00 | 104.93% | 7. Govt. Grant (city tax) | 3,400,000.00 | 3,400,000.00 | 100.00% | 8. Loan | 14,100,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 9. Deposit & Advance | 22,500,000.00 | 6,469,740.00 | 28.75% | Total | 364,051,733.00 | 171,705,463.00 | 47.17% | Opening Balance | 31,547,252.00 | 17,261,399.00 | 54.72% | Total | 395,598,985.00 | 188,966,862.00 | 47.77% | Part 2: Development | | 1. Development Assistant Allocation | 150,000,000.00 | 114,482,225.00 | 76.32% | 2. Earnest Money | 15,000,000.00 | 17,042,835.00 | 113.62% | 3. Miscellaneous | 45,000,000.00 | 7,202,009.00 | 16.00% | Total | 210,000,000.00 | 138,727,069.00 | 66.06% | Opening Balance | 30,700,801.00 | 30,697,656.00 | 99.99% | Total | 240,700,801.00 | 169,424,725.00 | 70.39% | Part 3: Project | | | | 1. Project Sanction (A.D.P.) | 450,000,000.00 | 228,600,000.00 | 50.80% | 2. Digital City Project | 500,000.00 | | 0.00% | 3. ICT Support to SME | 500,000.00 | | 0.00% | 4. BMDF | 100,000,000.00 | | 0.00% | 5. Flood Control Project (2nd Phase) | 250,000,000.00 | | 0.00% | 6. Green South Asia Project | 500,000.00 | | 0.00% | 7. UPPR | 35,000,000.00 | | 0.00% | 8. Miscellaneous | 100,000,000.00 | 48,625,401.00 | 48.63% | Total | 936,500,000.00 | 277,225,401.00 | 29.60% | Opening Balance | 50,444,711.00 | 66,562,736.00 | 131.95% | Total | 986,944,711.00 | 343,788,137.00 | 34.83% | Grand Total | 1,623,244,497.00 | 702,179,724.00 | 43.26% |

Table 11: Expenditure Budget for Fiscal Year 2008-09 Heads | Proposed | Actual | Percentage | Part 1: Revenue | 1. Salary & Allowances, PF & Bonus | 183,391,152.00 | 130,727,579.00 | 71.28% | 2. Others (Institutional expense) | 46,170,000.00 | 3,488,798.00 | 7.56% | 3. Roads Maintenance & Development | 25,800,000.00 | 39,068.00 | 0.15% | 4. General Defense | 10,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 5. Education & Culture | 5,200,000.00 | 45,500.00 | 0.88% | 6. Regular Departmental Expenses | 24,337,000.00 | 12,106,503.00 | 49.75% | 7. Miscellaneous | 7,400,000.00 | 4,708,483.00 | 63.63% | 8. Loan | 21,000,000.00 | 5,682,558.00 | 27.06% | 9. Deposit & Advance | 5,700,000.00 | 5,069,259.00 | 88.93% | Total | 319,008,152.00 | 161,867,748.00 | 50.74% | Closing Balance | 76,590,833.00 | 27,099,114.00 | 35.38% | Total | 395,598,985.00 | 188,966,862.00 | 47.77% | Part 2: Development | 1. Development Assistant Allocation | 150,000,000.00 | 57,310,586.00 | 38.21% | 2. Earnest Money | 15,000,000.00 | 8,000,891.00 | 53.34% | 3. Miscellaneous | 75,000,000.00 | 47,226,811.00 | 62.97% | Total | 240,000,000.00 | 112,538,288.00 | 46.89% | Closing Balance | 700,801.00 | 56,886,437.00 | 8117.35% | Total | 240,700,801.00 | 169,424,725.00 | 70.39% | Part 3: Project | 1. Project Sanction (A.D.P.) | 450,000,000.00 | 282,184,083.00 | 62.71% | 2. Digital City Project | 500,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 3. ICT Support to SME | 500,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 4. BMDF | 100,000,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 5. Flood Control Project (2nd Phase) | 250,000,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 6. Green South Asia Project | 500,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 7. UPPR | 35,000,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 8. Miscellaneous | 100,000,000.00 | 205,359.00 | 0.21% | Total | 936,500,000.00 | 282,389,442.00 | 30.15% | Closing Balance | 50,444,711.00 | 61,398,695.00 | 121.71% | Total | 986,944,711.00 | 343,788,137.00 | 34.83% | Grand Total | 1,623,244,497.00 | 702,179,724.00 | 43.26% |

Figure 1: Proposed and Actual Income Budget for 2008-2009

Figure 2: Proposed and Actual Expenditure Budget for 2008-2009

Table 12: Total Budget and Sum of Development & Project Budget for 2008-09 Heads | Proposed | Actual | Total Budget | 1,623,244,497.00 | 702,179,724.00 | Sum of Development & Project | 1,227,645,512.00 | 513,212,862.00 | Percentage | 75.63% | 73.09% |

Figure 3: Total Budget and Sum of Development & Project Budget for 2008-09

Table 13: Income Budget for Fiscal Year 2009-10 Heads | Proposed | Actual | Percentage | Part 1: Revenue | 1. Tax | 118,339,516.00 | 76,152,649.00 | 64.35% | 2. Rates | 198,327,467.00 | 76,570,353.00 | 38.61% | 3. Fees | 9,035,000.00 | 9,016,411.00 | 99.79% | 4. Rent & Profits | 119,230,000.00 | 50,440,852.00 | 42.31% | 5. Donation(voluntary) | 500,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 6. Miscellaneous | 10,396,000.00 | 21,868,036.00 | 210.35% | 7. Govt. Grant (city tax) | 3,400,000.00 | 3,400,000.00 | 100.00% | 8. Loan | 14,100,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 9. Deposit & Advance | 26,350,000.00 | 9,319,530.00 | 35.37% | Total | 499,677,983.00 | 246,767,831.00 | 49.39% | Opening Balance | 17,261,399.00 | 6,021,269.00 | 34.88% | Total | 516,939,382.00 | 252,789,100.00 | 48.90% | Part 2: Development | 1. Development Assistant Allocation | 200,000,000.00 | 140,882,000.00 | 70.44% | 2. Earnest Money | 15,000,000.00 | 27,551,918.00 | 183.68% | 3. Miscellaneous | 15,000,000.00 | 4,420,580.00 | 29.47% | Total | 230,000,000.00 | 172,854,498.00 | 75.15% | Opening Balance | 30,697,656.00 | 56,886,437.00 | 185.31% | Total | 260,697,656.00 | 229,740,935.00 | 88.13% | Part 3: Project | 1. Project Sanction (A.D.P.) | 800,000,000.00 | 408,500,000.00 | 51.06% | 2. BMDF | 200,000,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 3. Flood Control Project (2nd Phase) | 250,000,000.00 | 166,329,024.00 | 66.53% | 4. Green South Asia Project | 2,000,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 5. UPPR | 50,000,000.00 | 59,853,887.00 | 119.71% | 6. Miscellaneous | 80,000,000.00 | 74,337,925.00 | 92.92% | Total | 1,382,000,000.00 | 709,020,836.00 | 51.30% | Opening Balance | 66,649,420.00 | 61,485,379.00 | 92.25% | Total | 1,448,649,420.00 | 770,506,215.00 | 53.19% | Grand Total | 2,226,286,458.00 | 1,253,036,250.00 | 56.28% |

Table 14: Expenditure Budget for Fiscal Year 2009-10 Heads | Proposed | Actual | Percentage | Part 1: Revenue | 1. Salary & Allowances, PF & Bonus | 217,561,409.00 | 149,420,317.00 | 68.68% | 2. Others (Institutional expense) | 47,020,000.00 | 3,961,399.00 | 8.42% | 3. Roads Maintenance & Development | 29,980,000.00 | 871,135.00 | 2.91% | 4. General Defense | 40,000.00 | 176,079.00 | 440.20% | 5. Education & Culture | 5,200,000.00 | 258,514.00 | 4.97% | 6. Regular Departmental Expenses | 27,877,000.00 | 18,851,680.00 | 67.62% | 7. Miscellaneous | 7,200,000.00 | 2,172,879.00 | 30.18% | 8. Loan | 11,000,000.00 | 500,000.00 | 4.55% | 9. Deposit & Advance | 7,700,000.00 | 8,348,221.00 | 108.42% | Total | 353,578,409.00 | 184,560,224.00 | 52.20% | Closing Balance | 163,360,973.00 | 68,228,876.00 | 41.77% | Total | 516,939,382.00 | 252,789,100.00 | 48.90% | Part 2: Development | 1. Development Assistant Allocation | 200,000,000.00 | 115,732,385.00 | 57.87% | 2. Earnest Money | 40,000,000.00 | 26,956,617.00 | 67.39% | 3. Miscellaneous | 20,000,000.00 | 5,355,192.00 | 26.78% | Total | 260,000,000.00 | 148,044,194.00 | 56.94% | Closing Balance | 697,656.00 | 81,696,741.00 | 11710.18% | Total | 260,697,656.00 | 229,740,935.00 | 88.13% | Part 3: Project | 1. Project Sanction (A.D.P.) | 800,000,000.00 | 344,226,842.00 | 43.03% | 2. BMDF | 200,000,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 3. Flood Control Project (2nd Phase) | 250,000,000.00 | 158,431,092.00 | 63.37% | 4. Green South Asia Project | 2,000,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 5. UPPR | 50,000,000.00 | 52,500,000.00 | 105.00% | 6. Miscellaneous | 80,000,000.00 | 34,248,174.00 | 42.81% | Total | 1,382,000,000.00 | 589,406,108.00 | 42.65% | Closing Balance | 66,649,420.00 | 181,100,107.00 | 271.72% | Total | 1,448,649,420.00 | 770,506,215.00 | 53.19% | Grand Total | 2,226,286,458.00 | 1,253,036,250.00 | 56.28% |

Figure 4: Proposed and Actual Income Budget for 2009-10

Figure 5: Proposed and Actual Expenditure Budget for 2009-10

Table15: Total Budget and Sum of Development & Project Budget for 2009-10 Heads | Proposed | Actual | Total Budget | 2,226,286,458.00 | 1,253,036,250.00 | Sum of Development & Project | 1,448,649,420.00 | 770,506,215.00 | Percentage | 65.07% | 61.49% |

Figure 6: Total Budget and Sum of Development & Project Budget for 2009-10

Table 16: Income Budget for Fiscal Year 2010-11 Heads | Proposed | Actual | Percentage | Part 1: Revenue | 1. Tax | 136,409,754.00 | 100,595,679.00 | 73.75% | 2. Rates | 180,211,433.00 | 90,951,170.00 | 50.47% | 3. Fees | 10,500,000.00 | 19,092,836.00 | 181.84% | 4. Rent & Profits | 95,325,064.00 | 69,806,139.00 | 73.23% | 5. Donation(voluntary) | 500,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 6. Miscellaneous | 46,081,110.00 | 28,044,969.00 | 60.86% | 7. Govt. Grant (city tax) | 3,400,000.00 | 34,400,000.00 | 1011.76% | 8. Loan | 10,250,000.00 | 3,000,000.00 | 29.27% | 9. Deposit & Advance | 9,000,000.00 | 3,618,229.00 | 40.20% | Total | 491,677,361.00 | 349,509,022.00 | 71.09% | Opening Balance | 6,021,269.00 | 67,180,711.00 | 1115.72% | Total | 497,698,630.00 | 416,689,733.00 | 83.72% | Part 2: Development | 1. Development Assistant Allocation | 200,000,000.00 | 233,640,587.00 | 116.82% | 2. Earnest Money | - | - | - | 3. Miscellaneous | 20,000,000.00 | 88,453,228.00 | 442.27% | Total | 220,000,000.00 | 322,093,815.00 | 146.41% | Opening Balance | 56,886,437.00 | 81,696,742.00 | 143.61% | Total | 276,886,437.00 | 403,790,557.00 | 145.83% | Part 3: Project | 1. Project Sanction (A.D.P.) | 1,224,500,000.00 | 466,500,000.00 | 38.10% | 2. BMDF | 190,000,000.00 | 19,735,601.00 | 10.39% | 3. Flood Control Project (2nd Phase) | 230,000,000.00 | 134,000,000.00 | 58.26% | 4. UPPR | 50,000,000.00 | 50,000,000.00 | 100.00% | 5. Miscellaneous | 80,000,000.00 | 14,896,915.00 | 18.62% | Total | 1,774,500,000.00 | 685,132,516.00 | 38.61% | Opening Balance | 61,485,379.00 | 181,100,107.00 | 294.54% | Total | 1,835,985,379.00 | 866,232,623.00 | 47.18% | Grand Total | 2,610,570,446.00 | 1,686,712,913.00 | 64.61% |

Table 17: Expenditure Budget for Fiscal Year 2009-10 Heads | Proposed | Actual | Percentage | Part 1: Revenue | 1. Salary & Allowances, PF & Bonus | 256,794,517.00 | 191,144,193.00 | 74.43% | 2. Others (Institutional expense) | 54,220,000.00 | 36,222,813.00 | 66.81% | 3. Roads Maintenance & Development | 87,300,000.00 | 13,871,654.00 | 15.89% | 4. General Defense | 50,000.00 | - | 0.00% | 5. Education & Culture | 8,200,000.00 | 1,072,922.00 | 13.08% | 6. Regular Departmental Expenses | 37,323,900.00 | 25,825,960.00 | 69.19% | 7. Miscellaneous | 39,910,000.00 | 4,657,546.00 | 11.67% | 8. Loan | 12,000,000.00 | 27,638,992.00 | 230.32% | 9. Deposit & Advance | 1,100,000.00 | 1,048,097.00 | 95.28% | Total | 496,898,417.00 | 301,482,177.00 | 60.67% | Closing Balance | 800,213.00 | 115,207,556.00 | 14397.11% | Total | 497,698,630.00 | 416,689,733.00 | 83.72% | Part 2: Development | 1. Development Assistant Allocation | 200,000,000.00 | 205,973,321.00 | 102.99% | 2. Earnest Money | - | - | - | 3. Miscellaneous | 20,000,000.00 | - | 0.00% | Total | 220,000,000.00 | 205,973,321.00 | 93.62% | Closing Balance | 56,886,437.00 | 197,817,236.00 | 347.74% | Total | 276,886,437.00 | 403,790,557.00 | 145.83% | Part 3: Project | 1. Project Sanction (A.D.P.) | 1,224,500,000.00 | 470,300,177.00 | 38.41% | 2. BMDF | 190,000,000.00 | 267,217.00 | 0.14% | 3. Flood Control Project (2nd Phase) | 230,000,000.00 | 127,388,910.00 | 55.39% | 4. UPPR | 50,000,000.00 | 50,000,000.00 | 100.00% | 5. Miscellaneous | 80,000,000.00 | 111,256.00 | 0.14% | Total | 1,774,500,000.00 | 648,067,560.00 | 36.52% | Closing Balance | 61,485,379.00 | 218,165,063.00 | 354.82% | Total | 1,835,985,379.00 | 866,232,623.00 | 47.18% | Grand Total | 2,610,570,446.00 | 1,686,712,913.00 | 64.61% |

Figure 7: Proposed and Actual Income Budget for 2010-11

Figure 8: Proposed and Actual Expenditure Budget for 2010-11

Table 18: Total Budget and Sum of Development & Project Budget for 2010-11 Heads | Proposed | Actual | Total Budget | 2,610,570,446.00 | 1,686,712,913.00 | Sum of Development & Project | 2,112,871,816.00 | 1,270,023,180.00 | Percentage | 80.94% | 75.30% |

Figure 9: Total Budget and Sum of Development & Project Budget for 2010-11

Table 19: Income Budget for Fiscal Year 2011-12 Heads | Proposed | Revised | Percentage | Part 1: Revenue | 1. Tax | 141,946,779.00 | 118,174,536.00 | 83.25% | 2. Rates | 176,054,162.00 | 78,604,948.00 | 44.65% | 3. Fees | 22,325,000.00 | 6,058,130.00 | 27.14% | 4. Rent & Profits | 41,167,218.00 | 38,368,819.00 | 93.20% | 5. Donation(voluntary) | 500,000.00 | 5,000.00 | 1.00% | 6. Miscellaneous | 36,778,500.00 | 10,146,663.00 | 27.59% | 7. Govt. Grant (city tax) | 34,400,000.00 | 6,500,000.00 | 18.90% | 8. Loan | 10,100,000.00 | 19,568,412.00 | 193.75% | 9. Deposit & Advance | 2,787,669.00 | 1,568,556.00 | 56.27% | Total | 466,059,328.00 | 278,995,064.00 | 59.86% | Opening Balance | 113,694,932.00 | 108,271,584.00 | 95.23% | Total | 579,754,260.00 | 387,266,648.00 | 66.80% | Part 2: Development | 1. Development Assistant Allocation | 250,000,000.00 | 260,000,000.00 | 104.00% | 2. Earnest Money | - | - | - | 3. Miscellaneous | - | - | - | Total | 250,000,000.00 | 260,000,000.00 | 104.00% | Opening Balance | - | 197,820,226.00 | - | Total | 250,000,000.00 | 457,820,226.00 | 183.13% | Part 3: Project | 1. Project Sanction (A.D.P.) | 1,932,000,000.00 | 510,000,000.00 | 26.40% | 2. BMDF | 185,606,015.00 | 244,140,000.00 | 131.54% | 3. Flood Control Project (2nd Phase) | 140,000,000.00 | 114,844,988.00 | 82.03% | 4. UPPR | 25,000,000.00 | 103,700,000.00 | 414.80% | 5. UPEHSDP | 80,000,000.00 | - | | 6. Miscellaneous | 20,000,000.00 | 19,149,877.00 | 95.75% | Total | 2,382,606,015.00 | 991,834,865.00 | 41.63% | Opening Balance | 213,524,932.00 | 132,294,936.00 | 61.96% | Total | 2,596,130,947.00 | 1,124,129,801.00 | 43.30% | Grand Total | 3,425,885,207.00 | 1,969,216,675.00 | 57.48% |

Table 20: Expenditure Budget for Fiscal Year 2011-12 Heads | Proposed | Revised | Percentage | Part 1: Revenue | 1. Salary & Allowances, PF & Bonus | 236,118,019.00 | 206,241,353.00 | 87.35% | 2. Others (Institutional expense) | 44,810,000.00 | 29,795,280.00 | 66.49% | 3. Roads Maintenance & Development | 150,211,000.00 | 91,543,457.00 | 60.94% | 4. General Defense | 50,000.00 | 50,000.00 | 100.00% | 5. Education & Culture | 8,600,000.00 | 4,110,694.00 | 47.80% | 6. Regular Departmental Expenses | 35,753,700.00 | 29,396,639.00 | 82.22% | 7. Miscellaneous | 14,320,000.00 | 17,797,096.00 | 124.28% | 8. Loan | 4,500,000.00 | 6,980,000.00 | 155.11% | 9. Deposit & Advance | 1,100,000.00 | 465,760.00 | 42.34% | Total | 495,462,719.00 | 386,380,279.00 | 77.98% | Closing Balance | 84,291,541.00 | 886,369.00 | 1.05% | Total | 579,754,260.00 | 387,266,648.00 | 66.80% | Part 2: Development | 1. Development Assistant Allocation | 250,000,000.00 | 260,000,000.00 | 104.00% | 2. Earnest Money | - | - | - | 3. Miscellaneous | - | - | - | Total | 250,000,000.00 | 260,000,000.00 | 104.00% | Closing Balance | - | 197,820,226.00 | - | Total | 250,000,000.00 | 457,820,226.00 | 183.13% | Part 3: Project | 1. Project Sanction (A.D.P.) | 1,932,000,000.00 | 610,000,000.00 | 31.57% | 2. BMDF | 185,606,015.00 | 244,140,000.00 | 131.54% | 3. Flood Control Project (2nd Phase) | 140,000,000.00 | 114,844,988.00 | 82.03% | 4. UPPR | 25,000,000.00 | 103,700,000.00 | 414.80% | 5. Miscellaneous | 80,000,000.00 | - | 0.00% | Total | 1,000,000.00 | 3,000,000.00 | 300.00% | Closing Balance | 2,363,606,015.00 | 1,075,684,988.00 | 45.51% | Total | 232,524,932.00 | 48,444,813.00 | 20.83% | Grand Total | 2,596,130,947.00 | 1,124,129,801.00 | 43.30% |

Figure 10: Proposed and Revised Income Budget for 2011-12

Figure11: Proposed and Revised Expenditure Budget for 2011-12

Table 21: Ratio of Total Budget and Sum of Development & Project Budget for 2010-11 Heads | Proposed | Actual | Total Budget | 3,425,885,207.00 | 1,969,216,675.00 | Sum of Development & Project | 2,632,606,015.00 | 1,251,834,865.00 | Percentage | 76.84% | 63.57% |

Figure 12: Total Budget and Sum of Development & Project Budget for 2010-11

Table 22: Ratio between Proposed and Actual Budget Fiscal Year | Proposed | Actual | Percentage | 2006-07 | 2,125,683,128.00 | 688,909,524.00 | 32.41% | 2007-08 | 1,521,865,053.00 | 714,161,294.00 | 46.93% | 2008-09 | 1,623,244,497.00 | 702,179,724.00 | 43.26% | 2009-10 | 2,226,286,458.00 | 1,253,036,250.00 | 56.28% | 2010-11 | 2,610,570,446.00 | 1,686,712,913.00 | 64.61% | 2011-12 | 3,425,885,207.00 | 1,969,216,675.00(Revised) | 57.48% |

Figure 13: Proposed and Actual Budget from 2006-07 to 2011-12

Figure 14: Percentage Achieved on the basis of Proposed Budget from 2006-07 to 2011-12

Findings:
In 2008-09, we can see that the total proposed budget of income and expenditure was tk. 1,623,244,497.
In that budget
Revenue income was tk. 364,051,733.00 And expenditure was tk. 319,008,152.00;
Development income was tk. 210,000,000.00 And Expenditure was tk. 240,000,000.00; Project income was tk. 936,500,000.00 And Expenditure was tk. 936,500,000.00.
Here we can also observe the difference between the proposed budget which was 43.26%.
In 2009-10, we can see that the total proposed budget of income and expenditure was tk. 2,226,286,458.00, where,
Revenue income was tk. 499,677,983.00 And expenditure was tk. 353,578,409.00
Development income was tk. 230,000,000.00 And Expenditure was tk. 353,578,409.00; Project income was tk. 1,382,000,000.00 And Expenditure was tk. 1,382,000,000.00.
In 2010-11, we can see that the total proposed budget of income and expenditure was tk. 2,610,570,446.00, where,
Revenue income was tk. 491,677,361.00 And expenditure was tk. 496,898,417.00
Development income was tk. 220,000,000.00 And Expenditure was tk. 220,000,000.00; Project income was tk. 1,774,500,000.00 And Expenditure was tk. 1,774,500,000.00.
The development and the projects are for the different sectors to develop the condition of this area. The project titles are Project Sanction (A.D.P.), Digital City Project, ICT Support to SME, BMDF, Flood Control Project (2nd Phase), Green South Asia Project, EPPR. All the projects have a great contribution to increase the socio-economic condition of the people of Rajshahi.
By the actual column of the budget, we can understand the actual income earned and actual expenditure occurred by the corporation.
In 2008-09 budget,
The actual total income and expenditure was tk. 702,179,724.00; in where, the actual revenue income was tk. 171,705,463.00, which is 47.17% of the proposed. The revenue expenditure was tk. 161,867,748.00; which is 50.74% of the proposed. The actual development income was tk. 138,727,069.00; which is 66.06% of the proposed and the expenditure was tk. 112,538,288.00; which is 46.89% of the proposed. The project income was tk. 277,225,401.00; which is 29.06% of the proposed and the expenditure was tk. 282,389,442.00; which is 30.15% of the proposed. In this year 75.60% of the total proposed budget was for the development & project purpose and it was 73.09% in the actual budget.
In 2009-10 budget,
The actual total income and expenditure was tk. 1,253,036,250.00; in where, the actual revenue income was tk. 246,767,831.00, which is 49.39% of the proposed. The revenue expenditure was tk. 184,560,224.00; which is 52.20% of the proposed. The actual development income was tk. 172,854,498.00; which is 75.15% of the proposed and the expenditure was tk. 148,044,194.00; which is 56.94% of the proposed. The project income was tk. 709,020,836.00; which is 51.30%of the proposed and the expenditure was tk. 589,406,108.00; which is 42.65% of the proposed. In this year 65.07% of the total proposed budget was for the development & project purpose and it was 61.49% in the actual budget.
In 2010-11 budget,
The actual total income and expenditure was tk. 1,686,712,913.00; in where, the actual revenue income was tk. 349,509,022.00, which is 71.09% of the proposed. The revenue expenditure was tk. 301,482,177.00; which is 60.67% of the proposed. The actual development income was tk. 322,093,815.00; which is 146.41% of the proposed and the expenditure was tk. 205,973,321.00; which is 93.62% of the proposed. The project income was tk. 685,132,516.00; which is 38.61%of the proposed and the expenditure was tk. 648,067,560.00; which is 36.52% of the proposed. In this year 80.94% of the total proposed budget was for the development & project purpose and it was 75.30% in the actual budget.
In budget 2011-12,
The revised total income and expenditure is tk. 1,686,712,913.00; in where, the revised revenue income is tk. 349,509,022.00, which is 71.09% of the proposed. The revenue expenditure is tk. 301,482,177.00; which is 60.67% of the proposed. The revised development income is tk. 322,093,815.00; which is 146.41% of the proposed and the expenditure is tk. 205,973,321.00; which is 93.62% of the proposed. The project income is tk. 685,132,516.00; which is 38.61%of the proposed and the expenditure is tk. 648,067,560.00; which is 36.52% of the proposed. In this year 75.60% of the total proposed budget was for the development & project purpose and it was 73.09% in the actual budget.
We also calculate the ratio of between the proposed and actual budget of several fiscal year from 2006-07 to 2011-12. Here we find, in the year 2006-07, the ratio of actual budget to proposed budget is 32.41%, in 2007-08, 46.93%, in 2008-09, 43.26%, in 2009-10, 56.28%, in 2010-11, 64.61%, in 2011-12, 57.48% respectively. From 2006-07 to 2007-08 it increased, after that it decreased a little then it increased rapidly for the next two fiscal years. Finally it decreased a little in 2011-12.

Some Projects of Rajshahi City Corporation:
Rajshahi City Corporation involves with various development projects with different worldwide organization like World Bank, ADB, and NUDP etc. for the development of the socio-economic condition of the people of Rajshahi. Some projects are described briefly below:
Bangladesh Municipal Development Fund (BMDF):
This fund is granted by the World Bank for the development of municipal corporations of Bangladesh. World Bank donates a fixed amount of money for BMDF. On the basis of performance of the corporations, every corporation gets a part of that fixed amount. The good news is, Rajshahi City Corporation gets almost 240 million taka from this fund in 2011-12, which is half of the total amount of BMDF. This fund is used to construct roads and drainage system and to maintain them. Rajshahi City Corporation also got tk. 9530121 and tk19735601 in the fiscal year 2007-08 and 2010-11 respectively.

Urban People Poverty Reduction (UPPR):
Rajshahi City Corporation is involved with the Urban Partnerships for Poverty Reduction project (UPPR) that will support the implementation of strategies that respond to the challenges of urban poverty reduction in the context of Bangladesh’s rapid urbanization. Bangladesh’s urban population is growing at an estimated 3.6% per annum and its predicted urban population will be 50 million by 2015. In the City Corporation areas it is estimated that 35% of the population live in slums, 43 percent of urban households live in poverty and 23 percent are considered to be extremely poor. The Urban Partnerships for Poverty Reduction project (UPPR) will improve the livelihoods and living conditions of three million urban poor people in Bangladesh, especially women and girls, during the period 2007-2015. US$120 million are being provided for this purpose, on a cost sharing basis, by the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and UNDP.
RCC got tk. 59,853,887 in 2009-10, tk. 50,000,000 in 2010-11 and tk. 103,700,000 in 2011-12 fiscal year respectively. It is successfully implementing the objectives of the project for the reduction of urban people poverty.
UPPR seeks to mobilize and build the capacity of the urban poor and extreme poor to manage and improve their own lives. With technical support from the project, these groups are building mutual trust within their communities, developing their financial management capacities, and planning and managing community contracts to construct basic infrastructure as tube wells, latrines, drains, footpaths and multi-purpose center. The project also aims to increase wage employment through its apprenticeship and vocational training programs targeted at the urban extreme poor, vulnerable and marginalized. Education stipends for vulnerable, high-school age girls encourage them to stay in school and deter early marriage whilst block grants are given to those extreme poor households with the inspiration to start micro-businesses or urban farming. Besides assisting in settlement and livelihood improvements, UPPR also assists communities to address the social issues most pressing to them by forming linkages with local government, NGO and civil society service providers.

Urban Public and Environmental Health Sector Development Program (UPEHSDP):
On 28 September 2009, the Asian Development Bank (ADB) approved a program loan, a project loan, and a technical assistance grant to the Government of Bangladesh for the Urban Public and Environmental Health Sector Development Program (UPEHSDP).
The sector development program was laid out in the government’s development policy letter and policy matrix sent to ADB during project preparation. The reforms are designed to achieve sustainable provision and operation of improved public and environmental health services in urban areas, including the six city corporations and pourashavas. The reforms include - a. Strengthening institutional arrangements b. Improving financial sustainability c. Improving public and environmental health service delivery d. Strengthening governance and management

Recommendations:
On the basis of findings above, we can see that Rajshahi City Corporation performance in the socio-economic development of Rajshahi is good. It may follow the following recommendations to make its performance better.

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