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Botho University
Student Regulations

Student Regulations
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Table of Contents
1.

Abbreviations and Key Terms ..................................................................................................................3
1.1
Abbreviations ...................................................................................................................................3
1.2
Key Terms.........................................................................................................................................3
2. Qualifications and Credits ........................................................................................................................5
2.1
Qualifications ...................................................................................................................................5
2.2
Credits and Notional Learning Hours ...............................................................................................5
2.2.1 Guidelines for Independent Learning Hours for Skills Training Courses .....................................6
2.2.2 Guidelines for Independent Learning Hours for Higher Education Qualifications ......................6
3. General Academic Regulations ................................................................................................................7
3.1
Entry Requirements and Exemptions ..............................................................................................7
3.1.1 Certificate .....................................................................................................................................7
3.1.2 Diploma, Professional Diploma, Bachelor’s Degree ....................................................................7
3.1.3 Postgraduate Qualifications (PG Certificate, PG Diploma, Master’s Degree) .............................7
3.1.4 Exemptions...................................................................................................................................7
3.2
General Higher Education Qualification Structures.........................................................................8
3.3
Certification......................................................................................................................................8
3.4
Credit Load and Module Availability ................................................................................................9
3.5
General Assessment Structure ........................................................................................................9
3.6
Grading System ................................................................................................................................9
3.7
Classification ..................................................................................................................................10
3.8
Academic Standing.........................................................................................................................11
3.9
Communication ..............................................................................................................................11
3.10 Partnership Programmes ...............................................................................................................11
4. Assessment Regulations ........................................................................................................................12
4.1
Examination Regulation .................................................................................................................12
4.1.1 Before the Examination .............................................................................................................12
4.1.2 Entering the Examination Room ................................................................................................12
4.1.3 During the Examination .............................................................................................................12
4.1.4 Announcement of Results..........................................................................................................13
4.2
Academic Honesty Regulation .......................................................................................................13
4.2.1 Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism .......................................................................................13
4.2.2 Plagiarism Detection Software ..................................................................................................14
4.2.3 Penalty for Academic Misconduct .............................................................................................14
4.3
Appeals Regulation ........................................................................................................................15
4.3.1 Grounds for Appeals ..................................................................................................................15
4.3.2 Appeals Procedure for Internal Assessment .............................................................................15
4.3.3 Appeals Procedure for Examinations, other standardised assessment and Academic Honesty issues 16
4.4
Mitigation Regulation ....................................................................................................................16
5. Library Regulations ................................................................................................................................17
5.1
User Access ....................................................................................................................................17
5.2
Conduct while in the Library ..........................................................................................................17
5.3
Lending ...........................................................................................................................................17
5.4
Fines and Charges ..........................................................................................................................17
5.5
User Responsibilities ......................................................................................................................18
6. Student Grievance Handling Regulations ..............................................................................................18

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6.1
Grievances......................................................................................................................................18
6.2
Grievance Handling Procedure ......................................................................................................18
6.3
Staff-Student Consultative Committee (SSCC) ..............................................................................19
6.4
Student Representative Council (SRC) ...........................................................................................19
7. Student Discipline Regulations ..............................................................................................................19
7.1
Disciplinary Offences .....................................................................................................................19
7.2
Disciplinary Procedure ...................................................................................................................20
8. Computing Resources Usage Regulations .............................................................................................21
8.1
Introduction ...................................................................................................................................21
8.2
Acceptable and Unacceptable Use ................................................................................................21
8.3
Enforcement and legal context ......................................................................................................22
9. Fee Regulations ......................................................................................................................................22
9.1
Fee Schedule ..................................................................................................................................22
9.2
Payment Regulation .......................................................................................................................22
9.3
Refund policy .................................................................................................................................22
10.
Student Exchange Regulations...........................................................................................................23
10.1 Student Eligibility and Selection ....................................................................................................23
10.2 Programme of Study and Exemptions or Credit Transfer .............................................................23
10.3 Fees and Other Costs .....................................................................................................................23
10.4 Housing ..........................................................................................................................................24
10.5 Student Support .............................................................................................................................24
10.6 Discipline ........................................................................................................................................24

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Abbreviations and Key Terms
Abbreviations

CGPA: Cumulative Grade Point Average
FAC: Faculty Assessment Committee
FPC: Faculty Programmes Committee
SGPA: Semester Grade Point Average
SRC: Student Representative Council
SSCC: Staff Student Consultative Committee
1.2

Key Terms

Academic Good Standing: The status of a student who achieved aSGPA of 2.00 or higher in the previous registered semester. A student will be in academic good standing during their first semester.
Academic Probation: The status of a student who achieved aSGPA of less than 2.00 in the previous registered semester.
Academic Year: The academic year is normally from July to June and consists of two semesters with short breaks between each semester.
Appeal: A formal request to change an official decision normally in writing accompanied by substantial supporting evidence to support the request.
Assessment: Any method used to formally evaluate a student’s achievement of the learning outcomes.
Assessments may consist of written examinations, computer-based examinations, practical examinations, oral examinations, tests, assignments, presentations, projects and portfolios amongst others.
Co-requisite Modules: Modules that must be studied together in the same semester. If one co-requisite module is passed while the other is failed, the failed module may be retaken independent of the passed module. Core Module: A module that must compulsorily be passed in order to achieve a qualification.
Course: Typically refers to a module that leads to a qualification of its own.
Credit: The number of points allocated to any programme of study based upon the number of hours of learning typically expected of the student to achieve the learning outcomes for the given programme of study. One credit is equal to ten notional learning hours.
Drop-Out: The status of a student who has been excluded from continuing their studies normally due to non-payment of fees, academic performance, disciplinary concerns amongst other reasons. A student may choose to drop out and not to continue with their studies due to personal reasons.
Elective Module: A module that is part of a list of modules from which a given number must be compulsorily passed in order to achieve a qualification.
Executive Authority: Any member of staff or other authority representing the Universityor acting on behalf of the University who is responsible for providing the service, in charge of the activity or in charge of the facility being considered.

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Full-Time Student: A student registered for 60 or more credits in a semester.
Guided Learning Hours: The estimated formal and structured study time needed to help an average student achieve the learning outcomes of a module or course. This formal and structured study time is supported in person or at a distance by a lecturer or teaching assistant. Examples of guided study time include time spent in a formal classroom or lab session, time spent in a project supervision meeting with a project advisor, and time spent studying using structured learning material or a virtual learning environment as may be the case in distance or blended learning programmes.
Grade and Grade Point: Standardised measures of a student’s performance in a given module.
Higher Education Qualification: Typically longer programmes that consist of large or multiple modules which build knowledge and skills in a broad area of a discipline at lower levels while focusing on a more specialised area of a discipline at higher levels. These qualifications also build skills in research, independent study, and communication.
Home Institution: In the case of a student exchange programme, this is the University or institution at which the given student is enrolled for their primary programme of study. This is the University or institution from which the student is sent out on an exchange programme.
Host Institution: In the case of a student exchange programme, this is the University or institution to which the student goes to study from their Home Institution.
Independent Learning Hours: The estimated time an average student is expected to spend outside of guided learning hours to achieve the learning outcomes of a module or course. Examples of independent learning hours include time spent studying, time spent researching, time spent doing an assessment or activity, and time spent actively participating in a group meeting.
Module: A component of a programme that is assigned a specific credit value and which, in the case of higher education qualifications, appears independently on a transcript with a grade and grade point.
Notional Learning Hours: The number of hours an average student is expected to study in order to achieve the learning outcomes of a module or course. Notional learning hours consist of both guided learning hours and independent learning hours.
Part-Time Student: A student registered for less than 60 credits in a semester.
Pre-requisite: Required preliminary knowledge or a module that must be passed in order to attempt a given module.
Programme: A sequence of one or more core and elective modules over a specified period, successful completion of which leads to a qualification such as certificate, diploma and degree.
Skills Training Course: A course, normally leading to a certificate, that is designed to teach work-related skills. These courses may be attendance-based or assessed. Successful completion of a skills training course earns the student a course attendance or completion certificate depending on the type of skills training course.

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Student Exchange Programme: A programme of study whereby a student from a Home Institution goes to study for a given period of time at a Host Institution. This could be a student from Botho University going to study at one of the University’s partner institutions or could be a student from the partner institution coming to study for a given period at Botho University. Student exchange programme may involve studying abroad or within the same country.
2.
2.1

Qualifications and Credits
Qualifications

Botho University offers higher education qualifications and skills training courses. Skills training courses are typically short programmes of study focused on work-related skills leading to a certificate. These courses normally take a semester or less of full-time study to complete. Most of these courses are studied part-time or block release (full- or half-day classes). Some of these courses are not formally assessed and may be attendance based in which case a graduate is awarded an attendance certificate.
Higher education qualifications are longer programmes of study that lead to awards consisting normally of a number of varied modules in a given subject area. Modules in these qualifications are normally formally assessed with a minimum pass mark. These qualifications build knowledge and skills in a broad area of a discipline at lower levels while focusing on a more specialised area of a discipline at higher levels. These qualifications also build skills in research, independent study, and communication. Such qualifications take at least a semester or more of full-time study (longer if studied part-time) and involve academic assessments that test for a strong understanding of theory and an ability to practice the skills learnt. Higher education qualifications are offered at the following levels (in increasing order of qualification level): Certificate, Diploma, Professional Diploma with Honours, Bachelor’s Degree with Honours,
Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma, Master’s Degree and Doctoral Degree. These qualification levels are benchmarked on a number of international qualification frameworks to ensure that Botho qualifications are comparable and compatible with international qualifications.
2.2

Credits and Notional Learning Hours

The credit value of a module or course is determined by the number of notional hours of learning required to achieve the learning outcomes. Notional learning hours consist of guided learning hours and independent learning hours. One credit is equivalent to ten notional learning hours. One typical year of full-time study is equivalent to 1200 notional learning hours or 120 credits.
Guided learning hours are typically formal and structured study sessions supported by a lecturer or teaching assistant. Examples of guided study time include time spent in a formal classroom or lab session, time spent in a project supervision meeting with a project advisor, and time spent studying using a structured study guide or virtual learning environment as may be the case in distance and blended learning programmes. Independent learning hours are time spent by the student outside of these structured and supported sessions specifically for the module such as studying, researching, doing an assessment or activity, or participating in a group meeting.
The amount of guided learning hours for a given module or course is estimated by the number of supported and structured session hours required for an average student to cover the material, perform in-session practicals, and where relevant do in-session revision for assessments. The amount of

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independent learning hours is estimated by the amount of time an average student would need to study outside of these sessions in order to achieve the learning outcomes – the amount of independent learning hours is typically estimated as a multiple of the guided learning hours. Assessed modules normally require more guided and independent learning hours than modules that are not assessed. It must be noted that notional learning hours are based on an average student and thus it is possible for a highly proficient student, possibly with some entry-level knowledge, to achieve the learning outcomes in less time; in such a case, the credit value of the given module or course will remain unchanged.
2.2.1 Guidelines for Independent Learning Hours for Skills Training Courses
Skills training courses are varied and do not all follow a standardised format. Some courses are attendance based and do not require much independent study from the student, such as with a single day-long course. Other courses may have a number of activities that students are expected to do outside of class or guided study time, thus requiring more independent study. Such activities may not be formally assessed, but are important to the students’ learning. Other courses may be more like higher education modules with formal assessments requiring a greater deal of independent learning from the student in order to pass the given course.
The following table gives a generic guide to the number of independent learning hours typically expected of the student for different types of skills training courses. It must be noted that the table is not a strict rule and some courses may expect more or less than this guide.

Type of Course
Purely attendance-based
Attendance-based with many out-of-class activities
Formally assessed with a minimum pass mark

Hours of independent learning per hour of guided learning
0 to 0.5 hours
0.5 to 1 hour
1 to 2 hours

2.2.2 Guidelines for Independent Learning Hours for Higher Education Qualifications
Higher education expects a great deal of independent learning from the student. The following table gives a generic guide to the number of independent learning hours typically expected of the student for every hour of guided study time at each qualification level. It must be noted that the table is not a strict rule and some modules may expect more or less than this guide. For example, project/dissertation and internship/professional practice modules typically expect substantially more independent learning with minimal guided learning time.
QualificationLevel
Certificate and Diploma
Professional Diploma with Honours
Bachelor’s Degree with Honours
Postgraduate
Certificate/Diploma
Master’s Degree
Doctoral Degree

Hours of independent learning per hour of guided learning
1 hour
1 to 2 hours
1 to 3 hours and 3 to 5 hours
Varies, typically guided learning time is minimal

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General Academic Regulations
Entry Requirements and Exemptions

A prospective student who is applying for Botho University programmes is typically required to have successfully completed their studies up to at least a qualification level one lower than the one being applied for. Mature applicants with lower level qualifications, but with ample relevant work experience may be considered. Such mature applicants may be required to pass additional admission requirements such as an interview or test and may be required to take a bridging programme. The normal entry requirements for applicants are detailed below for each level of qualification offered at Botho University.
It must be noted that a person who meets all entry requirements is not automatically guaranteed admission as a number of other factors may be considered from time to time.
3.1.1 Certificate
Most certificate programmes at Botho University have no special entry requirements, however applicants may be required to attend an interview or take a test to ascertain English skill and ability to study at this level. Specific programmes may have additional entry requirements.
3.1.2 Diploma, Professional Diploma, Bachelor’s Degree
Applicants are expected to have successfully completed secondary schooling. The typical minimum entry requirement is BGCSE, IGCSE, LGCSE or other equivalent secondary school leaving qualification with a minimum of five subjects passed with a grade of D or better. The Admissions Department maintains a points table which indicates the points awarded to prospective students for a given grade for a given secondary school qualification. These points are used to determine a more detailed entry requirement per programme.
3.1.3 Postgraduate Qualifications (PG Certificate, PG Diploma, Master’s Degree)
Applicants are expected to have completed an undergraduate degree preferably up to honours level at a reputed institution. Specific programmes may have additional entry requirements.
3.1.4 Exemptions
Applicants who have any prior learning or current competence relevant to the programme may apply for exemption from specific modules. Applications for exemption must be made to the MIS Department at least one month prior to the start of the module for which exemption is being sought. Applicants who have successfully completed a qualification from an institution with which Botho University has an articulation agreement for that qualification will be given exemptions as per the agreement. Other external qualifications (as well as industry vendor certifications) will be considered on a case-by-case basis and may be awarded exemptions if articulated to existing Botho University modules and if the qualification was awarded within five years of the start of the programme at Botho University. In cases where a previous qualification is not articulated or the application is based on current competence, the applicant may be required to take one or more tests. An applicant is typically required to achieve the pass mark for the given module in an exemption test to be considered for exemption. The final decision on whether an exemption may be granted or not rests with the Dean of Faculty. Exemptions for studies or competence gained outside of Botho University may not be given for more than two-thirds of the total credits in the programme. An exemption fee may be levied for each exemption received.
Any student who successfully completes a qualification at Botho University may apply to re-join for a higher-level qualification within the same stream. The student may not gain exemption for all modules especially in the case of any curriculum changes or if the qualification was earned over five years prior to the start of the higher-level qualification.

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General Higher Education Qualification Structures

The following are standard structures for different Higher Education Qualifications, however the
University may offer programmes with non-standard but comparable structures.
A standard higher education Certificate at Botho University will have at least 120 credits and typically take at least one year to complete under the normal full-time mode of study. A Certificate must be completed in at most twoyears from when the programme is started.
A standard Diploma qualification at Botho University will have at least 240 credits and typically take at least two years to complete under the normal full-time mode of study. A Diploma must be completed in at most fouryears from when the programme is started.
A standard Professional Diploma with Honours qualification will have at least 420 credits and take at least three-and-a-half years to complete including a full semester internship under the normal full-time mode of study. The full semester internship module, called the Professional Practice module, may typically be done after the student has passed at least 240 credits worth of modules. A Professional Diploma with
Honours must be completed in at most seven years from when the programme is started.
A standard Bachelors Degree with Honours qualification will have at least 540 credits and take at least four-and-a-half years to complete including a full semester internship under the normal full-time mode of study. The full semester internship module, called the Professional Practice module, may typically be done after the student has passed at least 240 credits worth of modules. A Bachelor’s Degree with
Honours must be completed in at most nine years from when the programme is started.
A standard Post Graduate Certificate qualification will have at least 60 credits at postgraduate level and take at least one semester to complete under the normal full-time mode of study. A Post Graduate
Certificate must be completed in at most two years from when the programme is started.
A standard Post Graduate Diploma qualification will have at least 120 credits at postgraduate level and take at least one year to complete under the normal full-time mode of study. A Post Graduate Diploma must be completed in at most three years from when the programme is started.
A standard Master’s Degree qualification will have at least 180 credits at postgraduate level and take at least one-and-a-half year to complete under the normal full-time mode of study. A Master’s Degree must be completed in at most four years from when the programme is started.
A standard Doctoral Degree qualification will have at least 540 credits at postgraduate level and take at least three years to complete under normal full-time mode of study. It must be noted that for doctoral study, full time study involves the completion of 180 credits in one year. A Doctoral Degree must be completed in at most six years from when the programme is started.
A student will be dropped out from their programme of study if the maximum time period for the qualification elapses. The Dean may grant an extension of up to one-year on the maximum time period for a qualification.
3.3

Certification

Certificates will be awarded only for the qualification for which the student has registered. In the case of a student who exits without meeting the requirements for the registered qualification, that student may

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be awarded a lower-level qualification if the requirements for that lower-level qualification have been satisfied. 3.4

Credit Load and Module Availability

Every programme consists of one or more modules where each module is worth a specific number of credits. 120 credits per year or 60 credits per semester is a normal full-time load. 180 credits per year is a normal full-time load for doctoral study. A student who wishes to take more than the normal full-time load requires special permission from the Dean.
Modules available to students may vary from semester to semester. Any Faculty has the right to withdraw a module before its start if there are fewer than 15 students registered on the module.
3.5

General Assessment Structure

Although different modules may have different assessment structures with different assessment categories and weightages, the typical assessment structure for most modules is: Attendance (or discussion board participation for Distance Learning programmes) 5%, Internal Assessment 10%, Mid
Assessment 25%, and End Assessment 60% giving a total of 100%. Mid and End Assessments are standardised and are taken by students across all lecturers and batches for a given module. Internal
Assessments are however set by individual lecturers for their respective batches.
The pass mark for each module is 50% calculated as the weighted average of the marks for each individual assessment component (such as Attendance, Internal, Mid and End Assessment). A student who scores 20% or higher but fails to achieve the 50% pass mark in a module after all assessment components have been considered may be given the opportunity to take a Supplementary Assessment, if available for the given module that assesses the entire module. On a case-by-case basis, the Faculty
Assessment Committee may choose an alternative assessment method it deems appropriate for a particular module by which to assess a failed student. Students who score less than 20% in a module are not eligible for a Supplementary Assessment for that module. Some modules may not have a
Supplementary Assessment.
The Supplementary Assessment, where offered, will normally be worth 100% of the supplementary mark for the module. It may in some modules be combined with other assessment components to constitute the supplementary mark. The supplementary mark will be capped at the pass mark. The supplementary mark and the original mark will be indicated on the transcript. The students ‘grade point averages will consider the greater of the supplementary mark and the original failed mark.
Students are required to attend all assessments. Students who miss assessments without mitigating circumstances may be considered for disciplinary action including being dropped out from school.
Students are required to adhere to the highest standards of academic honesty at all times, especially with assessments. The Academic Honesty Regulation places stringent penalties on academic misconduct such as plagiarism. Students caught for academic misconduct may be considered for disciplinary action including being dropped out from school.
3.6

Grading System

On completion of each module, a student will receive a letter grade and a grade point (where relevant) for that module. The grade points are used to calculate the student’s cumulative grade point average
(CGPA) and semester grade point average (SGPA). The CGPA is calculated as the credit weighted average of grade points achieved throughout the programme. Therefore, a module of 40 credits is given double

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the weightage to a 20-credit module. Where a module is repeated, the module will only count once towards the CGPA with the highest grade point earned being considered. The SGPA is calculated as the credit weighted average of grade points achieved during a given semester. These grade point averages can be calculated as follows: =



=

(




× ℎℎ )

ℎ (





× )

The letter grade and grade point allocated to a module will be based on the aggregate mark earned for the given module. Any grade will remain provisional until it has been approved by the Faculty
Assessment Committee. The letter grade and grade point will be allocated as per the table below:
Aggregate mark
90% ≤ Mark ≤ 100%
85% ≤ Mark < 90%
80% ≤ Mark < 85%
75% ≤ Mark < 80%
70% ≤ Mark < 75%
65% ≤ Mark < 70%
60% ≤ Mark < 65%
55% ≤ Mark < 60%
50% ≤ Mark < 55%
40% ≤ Mark < 50%
20% ≤ Mark < 40%
0% ≤ Mark < 20%
N/A
N/A
N/A

Letter grade
A+
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD
E
F
M
W
X

Grade point
4.00
3.75
3.50
3.25
3.00
2.75
2.50
2.25
2.00
1.00
0.00
0.00
N/A
N/A
N/A

Description
Outstanding
Excellent
Excellent
Good
Good
Good
Satisfactory
Satisfactory
Satisfactory
Marginal Fail
Fail
Fail
Exempted
Withdrawn
Pending

An‘X’ or ‘Pending’ grade indicates that the student’s final grade is still under consideration by the Faculty
Assessment Committee. A ‘W’ or ‘Withdrawn’ grade is given where a student has withdrawn from a module after having attended at least one class or where a student has been absent for the majority of the module including absent from most assessments – the decision to declare a student as withdrawn will be taken by the Faculty Assessment Committee. An ‘M’ or ‘Exempted’ grade is given for modules for which the student has been exempted due to recognition of prior learning or current competence.
Exempted modules are included in the total credits earned towards a programme but are not considered when calculating the grade point averages. Pending and Withdrawn modules are also not considered when calculating the grade point averages.
3.7

Classification

When a student has successfully met all the requirements to pass a qualification, the CGPA will be considered to determine the classification of the qualification. Certificate level qualifications will have no classification. Diploma and higher-level qualifications (except Bachelors level) use the classifications
“Distinction”, “Merit”, and “Pass” determined as per the table below.

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CGPA Range
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2.75 ≤CGPA < 3.50
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Classification
Distinction
Merit
Pass (no special classification)

Bachelors level qualifications use the classifications “First”, “Upper Second”, “Lower Second”, and “Third” determined as per the table below.
CGPA Range
3.50 ≤CGPA ≤ 4.00
3.00 ≤CGPA < 3.50
2.50 ≤CGPA < 3.00
CGPA < 2.50

Classification
First
Upper Second
Lower Second
Third

The Faculty Assessments Committee will consider student results and decide on classification levels as per the given guidelines. The FAC may consider border cases within 0.10 CGPA for possible increase to a higher classification level if necessary.
3.8

Academic Standing

A student who has a SGPA of 2.00 or higher from the just completed semester will be considered in
Academic Good Standing. A student who has met the requirement to progress but has a SGPA of less than 2.00 from the just completed semester will be considered in Academic Probation. Students in
Academic Probation will be supported and monitored by an Academic Advisor. Where a student remains in Academic Probation for an extended period (more than one semester) and in the opinion of the
Academic Advisor is not capable of successfully completing his or her programme of study, the student may be advised to change their programme of study to suit their skills and area of interest.
3.9

Communication

Communication with students by various departments in the University will normally be through the student portal, a notice board, an internal server, students’ Botho University e-mail addresses where available, a Virtual Learning Environment or other web location. Assessment results and other important information such as schedules and announcements will be posted on the student portal; notices may also be posted on designated notice boards on campus. It is the responsibility of the student to regularly check their student portal account, Botho e-mail account and notice boards on campus in particular those in the buildings in which they have class and the general notices boards. Students should not expect to receive results, announcements and other important notifications through any other means.
3.10 Partnership Programmes

Botho University may run some programmes in partnership with other institutions for which the student may be dual registered with both institutions. In such cases, the student must abide by all regulations of both Botho University and the other institution. Wherever there is material ambiguity in a given circumstance, the stricter of the two regulations will normally apply; however, in all cases, the decision of the Vice-Chancellor will be final on which regulation to follow in that situation.

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Assessment Regulations
Examination Regulation

An examination is a time-constrained assessment consisting of questions or tasks designed to test students’ knowledge and skills. It may be a practical examination, which expects students to demonstrate proficiency in conducting an experiment or executing a series of steps, or it may be a written, computer-based or oral examination. An examination may be closed or open-book.
4.1.1 Before the Examination
The Assessment Department will schedule the examination at a particular time and room(s). The schedule will be posted at least one week before the examination. Students are expected to study the schedule and understand when and where they will be taking which examination. Any queries concerning the schedule must be addressed to the Assessment Department as soon as possible before the examination. Any queries concerning the type of examination (e.g. practical examination, written examination, computer-based examination, etc.) should be addressed to the students’ lecturer before the examination. In the case of an assessment for a programme awarded by an external authority, which does not have a specific schedule from the external authority (such as with many computer based assessments which can be written throughout the year), Botho University will determine the assessment schedule for its students. Students are required to attempt the assessment as per the Botho University schedule.
Students who due to an illness or disability require any special arrangement must inform the Assessment
Department of these requirements with evidence well in advance. The Assessment Department will consider these requests and where possible make the requested arrangements if deemed necessary.
4.1.2 Entering the Examination Room
Students are expected to arrive well in advance of the start time for the examination. Students will normally be allowed into the examination room fifteen to thirty minutes before the start of the examination. Students will be required to show their Botho University Identity Card before entering the examination room. The student’s photograph, name and student identity number on the Botho
University Identity Card must be clearly visible else the student may not be allowed to enter the examination room. Seats will normally be labelled using the student’s identity number – large rooms will normally have a seating plan outside the room to help students find their seats. Students are expected to leave their belongings at a designated location as instructed by the invigilators and take their seats as quickly and quietly as possible. Students may only take to their examination table writing stationary and any other special material as allowed for the specific examination and detailed in its instructions (e.g. calculator). Students must display their Botho University Student Identity Card visibly on the table during the entire examination.
Students who arrive late will be allowed into the examination room up to thirty minutes from the start of the examination but will not be given any additional time. Students arriving after this time and those who do not attend the examination will be considered to be absent and to have achieved a mark of zero for the assessment. Students, who are absent due to severe mitigating circumstances, may apply for mitigation as per the Mitigation Regulation.
4.1.3 During the Examination
Students will be given five minutes before the start of the examination to read the instructions carefully and, where possible, skim the paper to check that it is the correct examination, that all pages are clear, that no pages are missing and that the correct equipment has been provided. Students who notice any

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problems at this stage or at any time during the examination should immediately raise their hand to attract the attention of an invigilator and report it to the invigilator in charge. The student may begin the examination only once told to do so by the invigilator. In addition to these regulations, the student is required to also follow the instructions provided in the examination and given by the invigilator during the examination.
Students who complete the examination before the stipulated ending time, should raise their hand to attract an invigilator to collect their examination; once all documents and equipment have been collected, the student should then leave the room as quietly as possible – regulations may vary for certain practical examinations; such changes will be clearly indicated as part of the instructions of the examination. Students wishing to visit the toilet should also raise their hand to attract an invigilator; an invigilator will then accompany the student to the toilet – the invigilator may ask the student to empty out their pockets and search the student if necessary. A student may visit the toilet at most once per hour unless given special permission by the invigilator.
Students who feel ill during the examination should also raise their hand to attract an invigilator; the invigilator will then assist the student as the invigilator feels most appropriate which may include calling the nurse, allowing the student to temporarily leave the examination room under supervision, or allowing the student to terminate the examination early. The student’s illness will be noted by the invigilator in their report at the end of the examination. Students who feel their illness greatly affected their performance may apply for mitigation as per the Mitigation Regulation.
No student, except when approved by the invigilator in the case of illness, may leave the examination room during the first sixty minutes and the last fifteen minutes of the examination.
Any student suspected of misconduct will be handled as per the Academic Honesty Regulation and the
Student Discipline Regulation.
4.1.4 Announcement of Results
Student results will be announced through either the student portal online or on one or more specifically allocated notice boards on campus. For external examinations, for which the external authority directly informs the student of their result, students are required to submit results to the Assessments
Department as soon as they receive their results.
4.2

Academic Honesty Regulation

4.2.1 Academic Misconduct and Plagiarism
The following will be treated as academic misconduct under this regulation:
1. Plagiarism, including but not limited to:
a. Using the ideas or concepts of another person without appropriately acknowledging the source of the information.
b. Failure to properly paraphrase or quote a source within the document.
c. Failure to cite a source within the document where necessary.
d. Failure to add a properly prepared reference section or bibliography at the end of the document. e. Providing false sources as acknowledgement.

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f. Producing work prepared and written by anyone other than the person submitting the assignment. g. Copying another person’s work partly or wholly and handing it in as one’s own.
h. Two or more students copying all or part of each other’s work and submitting their individual documents as their own, independent pieces of work, also known as collusion.
i. Posting course assignment questions online, especially when this is done to solicit answers to these questions.
2. Cheating in examinations by any means including but not limited to using notes, calculators or mobile phones when not permitted, obtaining an examination paper ahead of the normal schedule or sending someone else to take the examination on one’s behalf.
3. Providing false information as evidence.
4. Handing in a document under a false name, or the name of another person.
5. Sabotaging or stealing another person’s work.
6. Submitting a part or all of a single assignment or project to meet the requirements of an assessment in two different classes except where such a practice is expressly permitted
7. Tampering with equipment provided for a given assessment, such as tampering with or shutting down the computer during a computer-based assessment
8. Any attempt to change one’s grade by unauthorised means.
9. Any act which aids another person in committing an act of academic misconduct.
10. Any other act which a Dean or higher officer may determine to be an act of academic misconduct.
Academic misconduct of any form at any level is adequate reason for a student to fail an assessment or module or even be dropped out from school.
4.2.2 Plagiarism Detection Software
Botho University may use plagiarism detection software to assist academic staff in identifying plagiarism in a student’s submitted work. When using such software, the student is required to submit their files on time, with clear filenames which indicate the student’s or group’s name. The files should contain the exact version of any hard copy handed in. Files infected with one or more computer viruses may be considered as non-submissions. Specific modules may have specific submission requirements which must be followed.
4.2.3 Penalty for Academic Misconduct
All cases of academic misconduct can result in a student being dropped out from school in the very first instance. Occurrence of academic misconduct will be monitored across students’ careers at Botho
University and repeated academic misconduct across any module, quarter or programme will be considered as repeat offences at Botho University and will be treated with more severity. Whenever a student is caught for academic misconduct, the appropriate senior member of staff (evaluator, senior invigilator, etc.) will need to submit to the Assessments Manager a document containing details of the student’s academic misconduct together with any evidence including any written apology or explanation letter from the student.
Academic misconduct during an assessment from an external awarding body other than Botho University will be handled as per the Student Discipline Regulations and will also be informed to the external awarding body, which may also impose a penalty independent from any penalty imposed by Botho
University.
Other cases of academic misconduct will be handled by the Assessments Department directly. The
Department may in cases of severe academic misconduct refer the case to a Pro-Vice-Chancellor for

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disciplinary action as per the Student Disciplinary Regulations; else the department will form an Academic
Honesty Panel consisting of two or more senior members of staff constituted by the Assessments
Manager.
Depending on the severity of the misconduct, the Panel may impose:
1. A reduction in the mark for an assessment or module.
2. A mark of zero for an assessment or module.
3. A mark of zero for a module with no further supplementary opportunities for the given module.
4. Refer the student to a Pro-Vice-Chancellor for further disciplinary action as per the Student
Discipline Regulations.
A student may appeal the decision of the Academic Honesty Panel as per the Appeals Regulation.
4.3

Appeals Regulation

An appeal is a request to formally change an official decision. This regulation concerns appeals against assessment decisions and academic misconduct penalties issued by the Academic Honesty Panel.
4.3.1 Grounds for Appeals
Students may make an appeal in the following circumstances if the situation disadvantaged the student and is significant enough to have materially affected the decision being appealed:
1. Those parts of the Assessment Regulations were not applied.
2. That there was procedural irregularity with the conduct of the assessment.
3. That prejudice or bias has materially affected the decision being appealed.
Any appeal must be accompanied by sufficient evidence to support the claim being made in the appeal.
The following circumstances will not be considered grounds for appeal:
1. Perceived past shortcomings in tuition, supervision or support cannot be considered as grounds for appeal.
2. An Appeal may not be made to question the academic decision of the University or member of staff. 3. An Appeal may not be made against the actual mark awarded for a piece of assessed work, which is a matter of academic decision, except where the case rests on a claim of procedural irregularity.
4. Examiners have discretion to take into consideration extenuating circumstances, which are usually personal or medical. The extent of any discretion exercised by the examiners in relation to the student's extenuating circumstances is not a ground for appeal.
In the case of a standardised written examination for which the script is not returned to the student, the student may, for a fee fixed from time-to-time by the Office of Academic Services, request the examination to be re-marked. It must be noted that in the case of a re-mark, the new mark will replace the previous mark whether it increases or reduces the mark originally given.
4.3.2 Appeals Procedure for Internal Assessment
The first step when making an appeal is for the student to directly approach their lecturer for the respective module immediately upon receiving their marks or assessment decision. If the appeal is not resolved after meeting the lecturer, the student may then approach the appropriate Module Leader or
Head of Department with a written or e-mailed appeal with all supporting evidence. The decision of the
Module Leader or Head of Department is final.

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4.3.3 Appeals Procedure for Examinations, other standardised assessment and Academic
Honesty issues
Appeals and re-mark requests should be submitted to the Assessments Department within seven days of the student receiving notification of the decision they wish to appeal against or the publication of results.
Appeals and re-mark requests received after these seven days will not be considered.
Appeals should be submitted using the Appeal Form duly filled and detailing the type of decision being appealed, the grounds for appeal as set out in the Appeals Regulation and the reasons why the student considers there are grounds for appeal. The application should be supported by sufficient documentary evidence to support the claim. In the case of a standardised written examination for which the script is not returned to the student, if the student is requesting a re-mark that re-mark request together with the receipt details of the re-mark fee payment must be given in the appeal documentation. The student must also include any other documents as may be requested by the Assessments Department. Appeals that do not include the necessary documentation will not be considered.
The Assessments Manager or another senior official as designated by any Pro-Vice-Chancellor will consider the applications. The Assessments Manager may choose to form an Appeal Panel of two or more senior members of staff to consider the appeal and decide whether the appeal is valid. If the
Assessments Manager or the Appeal Panel decides that the appeal is valid, they will determine the appropriate future steps to assist the student, which may or may not include a re-run or re-mark of an assessment. The decision of the Assessments Manager or the Appeal Panel is final and may not be appealed. In the case of a paid re-mark request, the Assessments Manager or another senior official as designated by the Assessments Manager will coordinate with the Dean of the respective Faculty to have the examination re-marked. The new mark will replace the earlier mark; this new mark is final and the student may not file another appeal or re-mark request for that assessment.
4.4

Mitigation Regulation

Mitigation is the action of lessening or reducing the severity of missing all or part of an assessment due to valid reasons. Valid reasons include circumstances beyond the control of the student such as the death of an immediate family member (parent, sibling, spouse or child only) or severe incapacitating personal injury or illness. Claims of public transport delays and oversleeping among many others are not considered valid mitigating circumstances. Mitigation applications should only be submitted in very serious cases. Attempting to abuse this regulation will be considered a disciplinary offence.
Mitigation applications should be placed at the Assessments Department as soon as possible and at most five days after the assessment for which mitigation is being applied. Mitigation applications placed after five days of the assessment may not considered except in the case of severe injury or illness as a result of which the deadline could not be met.
All mitigation applications should be submitted using the Mitigation Form duly filled detailing the reason why the student was unable to submit, attend or complete the assessment. The application should be supported by sufficient documentary evidence (such as a medical certificate or death certificate) to support the claim. Applications that do not include the necessary documentation will not be considered.
The Assessments Manager or a senior official designated by the Assessments Manager will consider the applications and decide whether the mitigation application is valid and has materially disadvantaged the student. If it is determined that the student was indeed materially disadvantaged by the mitigating

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circumstance, the Assessments Manager in consultation with the relevant Dean of Faculty will determine how best to assist the student. The decision of the Assessments Managers final and may not be appealed. 5.
5.1

Library Regulations
User Access

Only registered and active students and staff of Botho University are eligible to use the library and its facilities. Users must present their valid identification cards to the security guard at the entrance as well as when borrowing or returning books at the circulation desk. Users may be requested at any time in the library to show their identification card and thus should keep it in their possession at all times while in the library. Library opening and closing times will be clearly displayed at all libraries and may be changed without notice. Electronic library services will normally be available throughout the day via the Internet and may be accessed by registered and active students.
5.2

Conduct while in the Library

All library users must abide by the following rules; any user found in breach of these rules may be asked to leave the library and/or subject to disciplinary processes as detailed in the Student Discipline
Regulations.
 Library users must observe strict silence at all times inside study areas.
 Drinking, eating and smoking are not allowed inside the library.
 Bags are not allowed inside the library.
 Mobile phones may not be used in the library and should be put on silent at all times.
 All computers inside the library must be used for educational purposes only.
 Books and other learning materials may only be taken from the library when issued out by a librarian through the library circulation system.
 Librarians have the right to inspect a library user and their personal belongings.
5.3

Lending

When loaning a book from the library, users are advised to check the return date and condition of the book before leaving the circulation desk. Any concerns about the return date or conditions must be addressed to the librarian in charge immediately else the student will be held responsible for any late return of the book and/or damage to the book.
User privileges are not transferable. A user will be held responsible for all materials taken out on his name. Users must return books in good condition on or before the return date, but the library reserves the right to ask users to present any materials issued to them for inspection at any point of time.
5.4

Fines and Charges

In case a library user returns a book late, he will be charged a per day fine which must be paid immediately. Library fine rates are available at the circulation desk and are subject to change without notice. In case a library book is damaged, the user who is using the book or has loaned the book will be charged the replacement value of the book. If a book is lost, the user must notify the librarian immediately, in which case a one week grace period will be given to search for the book. Users will be liable to pay the replacement value of the book if they are unable to find and return the book within the grace period.

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User Responsibilities

It is the responsibility of the user to:
 Read these regulations and clarify any questions with a senior librarian.
 Know that failure to conduct themselves as stated in the rules and regulations may lead to the suspension of their library privileges.
 Update their contact details with the library in case of any changes.
 Ensure that the photograph and information on their identity card is correct.
 Check their IPAC user account regularly.
 Ensure that they keep up to date with any changes and improvements done by the library
6.
6.1

Student Grievance Handling Regulations
Grievances

A grievance is a formal statement of concern reported to a person in authority at Botho University. A grievance can be about any kind of situation or process affecting the student, academic and nonacademic, and can be against another student or a staff member at Botho University. A grievance is not part of the regular student feedback, but rather a formal complaint. The University will not act on anonymous complaints.
6.2

Grievance Handling Procedure

Many student grievances emerge from a lack of communication or understanding and hence students should in the first instance attempt to resolve concerns or difficulties directly with the person(s) concerned. If the issue still remains unresolved, the student may raise their concerns with the appropriate senior member of staff such as the Module Leader, Head of Department, Dean, etc. If after this stage, the student still feels their concern has not been addressed, he may then submit a formal grievance to the Student and Alumni Affairs Department.
To file a formal grievance with the Student and Alumni Affairs Department, the student should fill in the
Student Grievance Form and provide any relevant evidence to support the grievance. The department will investigate the case, which may include a personal meeting with the student to understand the problem in detail. This meeting may be done over a web-based voice and video chat tool where a faceto-face meeting is not possible or necessary. The department may also have to raise the case with other necessary authorities within the institution.
The Student and Alumni Affairs Department will have to respond to the student in writing explaining the outcome of the investigation and the way forward. Amongst other possibilities, the ways forward may be that: 1.
The student, having received advice and support, addresses the matter directly with the respondent. 2.
The student receives an apology, or the issue that was the basis of the complaint is modified.
3.
A mutually acceptable resolution is reached through mediation within Botho University.
It must be noted that it is not always possible to achieve a satisfactory outcome from the student’s perspective, but the response should make it clear that the complaint has been investigated and responded to. The Student and Alumni Affairs Department will do its best to ensure that students who file grievances are not subjected to any victimisation. Any student who feels that they are being victimised should immediately report the case to the Student and Alumni Affairs Department.

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Staff-Student Consultative Committee (SSCC)

The Staff-Student Consultative Committees (SSCCs) exist to help student representatives meet with senior members of staff for formal, constructive and informative discussions on academic issues. The goal is to have ideas shared and discussed between students and staff to arrive at a consensus. These committees normally consist of senior academic and academic support staff together with a few class representatives
(normally three) and are chaired by the relevant Head of Department or Dean.
Students who have grievances that affect a large number of students in their programme may choose to raise their grievances at these committee meetings through the class representative members.
6.4

Student Representative Council (SRC)

The Student Representative Council (SRC) is a group of students elected by the student body to promote communication between students and Botho University staff and management, promote student welfare and encourage an active student body involved in sports, community service, and other activities.
Students who have grievances that affect the greater student body may choose to raise their grievances with the SRC who in turn will work with the respective departments in the University to try and resolve the issue.
7.
7.1

Student Discipline Regulations
Disciplinary Offences

It is important that students maintain the highest level of discipline at all times, especially when on campus and when dealing with University matters or representing the University outside of campus. The following are considered disciplinary offences for which a penalty may be applied as per this regulation:
1.
Conduct on or off University premises that, in the opinion of Botho University management, damages the institution’s reputation.
2.
Conduct that breaks any student regulation, including academic and assessment regulations.
3.
Conduct that disrupts interferes with or obstructs the operations, activities and events of the institution. 4.
Conduct that is violent, disorderly, threatens to cause injury or otherwise affect people’s safety at any University activity or on University premises.
5.
Conduct that is discriminatory or racist.
6.
Behaving rudely with another student, member of staff or visitor.
7.
Failure to follow instructions given by a member of staff.
8.
Conduct at an external location that breaks the regulations and policies of that external institution or location while it is being used for University activities or while the student is representing the University.
9.
Conduct that disadvantages assessment procedures including plagiarism.
10.
Knowingly making a false statement or providing false information.
11.
Failing to accept or comply with any penalty imposed as per this and other regulations.
12.
Revealing confidential information without permission.
13.
Conduct that damages, misuses or abuses any University equipment or facilities.
14.
Missing classes, appointments or assessments without mitigating circumstances.
15.
Conduct that in the opinion of the Vice-Chancellor is serious enough to warrant disciplinary action. Student Regulations
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Disciplinary Procedure

An Executive Authority is any member of staff or other authority representing the University or acting on behalf of the University who is responsible for providing the service, in charge of the activity or in charge of the facility where the offence was committed. The Executive Authority may include University management, lecturers, event managers, consultants, and security guards amongst others. When the disciplinary offence is committed the Executive Authority has the authority to immediately require the student to leave the room, facility or location where the offence was committed.
The Executive Authority is then advised to report the issue to the relevant department for further processing. Cases involving academic misconduct as defined in the Academic Honesty Regulations may be reported to the Assessments Department who will handle the issue as per that regulation. All other cases may be reported to the Campus and Student Housing Department or in the case of a severe or repeated offence the case may be reported to any Pro-Vice-Chancellor for further action. The Campus and Student Housing Department may choose to issue a warning letter to the student informing the student of the offence and warning that further such incidences may result in more severe disciplinary action. The Campus and Student Housing Department may also order the student to pay compensation for any damages caused by the student. A copy of any letters issued to the student must be given to the
MIS Department for filing with the student’s records.
In the case of a severe or repeated offence, the case may be laid before any Pro-Vice-Chancellor. The
Pro-Vice-Chancellor may decide on the appropriate penalty for the case. The Pro-Vice-Chancellor may choose to temporarily forbid the student from coming to the institution’s premises including participating in classes and other activities while the case is being considered. To assist the Pro-Vice-Chancellor, he may constitute a Disciplinary Committee of at least two senior members of staff to investigate the case.
If the committee wishes to interview the student, it must give the student at least 24 hours written notice of the hearing. The committee may also ask for any additional evidence or witnesses. The committee will then give a written report of the findings to the Pro-Vice-Chancellor. The Pro-Vice-Chancellor may choose to impose any penalty including but not limited to the following:
1.
Give a warning.
2.
Order the student to pay compensation for any damages caused.
3.
Impose a mark of zero for an assessment or module.
4.
Withdraw any credits previously earned.
5.
Temporarily suspend the student from University or a specific facility or activity.
6.
Expel the student permanently from the University.
Any decision must be given in writing. In the case of temporary suspension, the University will not be responsible for any classes, assessments or other activities that the student may miss during such suspension. The student has the right to appeal to the Vice-Chancellor who may constitute a Disciplinary Appeals
Committee of at least three senior members of staff excluding any Executive Authority or Pro-ViceChancellor who issued any earlier decision. The Appeals Committee will be responsible for investigating the case and informing the Vice-Chancellor of its findings. The Vice-Chancellor may then choose to change or keep unchanged any previous penalty. The Vice-Chancellor’s decision is final and may not be appealed. Student Regulations
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Computing Resources Usage Regulations
Introduction

Computing resources at Botho University are provided to support the educational, instructional, research and administrative activities of Botho University and the use of these resources is a privilege that is extended to members of the Botho University community. Users of these services and facilities have access to valuable University resources, to sensitive data, and to internal and external networks, thus it is important for users to behave in a responsible, ethical, and legal manner. Furthermore, computers and networks can provide access to resources on and off campus, as well as the ability to communicate with other users worldwide. Users must respect the rights of other users and respect the integrity of the systems and related physical resources. System administrators may monitor the activity of every individual user to ensure the system integrity and security of the resources provided.
These regulations apply to all users of computing resources owned or managed by Botho University.
Individuals covered by the policy include (but are not limited to) Botho University staff, visiting faculty, students, alumni, guests, agents of the administration, external individuals and organizations accessing network services via Botho University's computing facilities, personally owned computers and devices connected by wire or wireless to the campus network, and off-campus computers that connect remotely to the University's network services.
8.2

Acceptable and Unacceptable Use

Users may use only the computers, computer accounts, student portal and VLE accounts, and computer files for which they have authorisation. Users are individually responsible for appropriate use of all resources assigned to them, including the computer, network address, port, software and hardware.
Therefore, users are accountable to Botho University for all use of such resources. Authorised Botho
University users may not enable unauthorised users to access the network by using a Botho University computer or a personal computer that is connected to the Botho University network.
Users must comply with the regulations for any specific set of resources to which they have been granted access. When other regulations are more restrictive than this one, the more restrictive regulation takes precedence. Users must not use Botho University computing and/or network resources in conjunction with the execution of programs, software, processes, or automated transaction-based commands that are intended to disrupt (or reasonably be expected to disrupt) other computer or network users, or damage or degrade performance of software or hardware components of a system. On the Botho University network and/or computing systems, users should not use tools that are normally used to assess security or to attack computer systems or networks (such as password 'crackers,' vulnerability scanners, network sniffers, etc.) unless they have been specifically authorised to do so.
The following are also examples of misuse of computing privileges when performed without specific authorisation from the relevant Botho University authority.
1.
Attempting to circumvent data protection schemes or uncover security loopholes.
2.
Violating terms of applicable software licensing agreements or copyright laws.
3.
Deliberately wasting computing resources.
4.
Disconnecting of Botho University/Campus computer equipment in favour of personal equipment, including laptops or other electronic devices.
5.
Posting materials on electronic bulletin boards that violate existing laws or Botho University codes of conduct.

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Unauthorised troubleshooting and fixing of Botho University computer equipment.
Enforcement and legal context

Misuse of computing, networking, or information resources may result in the revocation of computing privileges. Users may be held accountable for their conduct under any applicable University or campus regulations. All national and international cyber-crime laws, regulations and policies also apply.If abuse of computer systems occurs, and the user is found to have violated these regulations, the user may be subject to appropriate disciplinary action as per relevant disciplinary regulations.
9.

Fee Regulations

9.1

Fee Schedule

A schedule of all fees will be available with the Accounts Department and with the Admissions
Department. Administrative fees are subject to change without notice. Tuition fees are subject to a 10% increase every year and thus students and sponsors are advised to budget this increase in fees. Any annual increase in tuition fees up to 10% may be made without notice. Any increase in tuition fees greater than 10% may be made after giving a minimum of two weeks written notice, which may be in the form of a letter to the students’ sponsors or through a notice on the notice boards on campus.
9.2

Payment Regulation

Fees are charged in full and are due prior to the provision of any given service. Tuition fees are therefore charged in full and are due prior to the start of orientation and classes. Students may contact the
Accounts Departments to request a payment plan where they are unable to pay the full fee in time. If a payment plan is approved and agreed upon, the first instalment is due prior to the commencement of orientation and classes. The second and further instalments are due on the first day of the month indicated on the payment plan.
A grace period of seven days may be given for the payment of second and subsequent instalments on special request; however, if the fees are not paid by the end of the grace period the student may be charged a late payment fee and will be sent out of class until the outstanding dues are settled. Students with overdue fees older than one month may be dropped out of the register. Such a student may be charged a drop-out fee and where relevant a down-grade fee so that they can be certified at a lower-level than the registered programme. The student will also be required to immediately pay the full fee
(including all monthly instalments) for the modules which have started. A student with outstanding dues may not be issued with any learning material and may not be allowed to write assessments.
Students may be awarded full or part scholarships based on criteria that will be in effect from time to time. All students on scholarship must complete the programme for which they are enrolled. Students on scholarship who discontinue their studies or take a break from their studies will be liable to pay the scholarship amount back to the institution immediately.
9.3

Refund policy

Tuition fees will only be refundable if the refund request is received at least 96 hours before the scheduled start of the given module or programme and if the student has not collected any study material from the institution. Refunds are subject to a refund fee. Registration and admission fees are non-refundable unless Botho University cancels or changes the scheduled start of classes; in such a case no refund fee will be charged.

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10. Student Exchange Regulations
10.1 Student Eligibility and Selection

Student exchange programmes are typically offered for specific parts of a given qualification and will be advertised to eligible students. Typical eligibility requirements require students to be studying full-time and to maintain a CGPA of at least 3.00. Students are also expected to have strong interpersonal skills, cultural awareness and a willingness to adapt to different conditions. Specific and additional eligibility criteria will be determined for each given student exchange programme and will be advertised to students when the programme is offered.
Students may apply for exchange and study abroad programmes if they meet the advertised eligibility criteria. The relevant Faculty will select the students with the assistance of the International
Development Department. Short-listed students may also be interviewed prior to selection. Any student finally selected to participate in the programme will have to be endorsed by both Botho University and the partner institution. Selected students will have to sign an agreement and will be expected to abide by the rules and regulations of the Host Institution. Parental consent will be required in writing for those participating students who are below the age of 18.
10.2 Programme of Study and Exemptions or Credit Transfer

Exchange programmes may vary in length and will have different modules that a student will need to study at the Host Institution. All details of the length of the programme and the modules to be studied will be advertised to students when the call for applications is released. Those exchange programmes that are a full semester in length will typically require the student to take a full-time study load at the
Host Institution for which the student will typically receive the equivalent full-time study credit or exemptions at the Home Institution. The specific modules that a student will study at the Host Institution and the credits or exemptions that the student will receive at their Home Institution may vary and will depend on the nature of the agreement between Botho University and the partner institution. Any credit or exemptions given by the Home Institution for studies done at the Host institution will be in accordance with the policies and procedures of the Home Institution. No credit or exemptions may be sought or received in the case of a module that has been failed at the Host Institution. A student may or may not have an opportunity to retake a failed module at the Host Institution; additional expenses incurred to take any supplementary assessments (including travel) will be the sole responsibility of the student or their sponsor.
10.3 Fees and Other Costs

All fees and expenses relating to the exchange programme are the responsibility of the student or their sponsor. All standard tuition fees and other costs must be paid in advance to the Home Institution.
Therefore, Botho University students going on exchange to a partner institution will need to pay all fees related to the exchange programme to Botho University. Exchange students who wish to participate in activities or studies beyond those specifically detailed in the exchange programme may be charged for such services by the Host Institution as per that institution’s norms.
Where an exchange programme requires immigration formalities such as in the case of exchanges involving study abroad, the student and their sponsor will be responsible for covering the cost of any visas, permits and other immigration documentation required to participate in the programme. Botho
University may assist its students with the process of procuring such documents.
Exchange students are required to have medical aid cover and travel insurance, which covers their travel to, entire stay at and travel from the Host Institution and country. Such insurance must include

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repatriation in case of any emergency or death. The student and their sponsor will be responsible for covering the cost of any such medical aid cover and travel insurance.
Transportation to and from the Host Institution at the start, during and at the end of the exchange programme will be the responsibility of the student or sponsor. The Home or Host Institution may provide transportation at a cost. Other direct costs, such as personal domestic transportation and food during the exchange programme, are the responsibility of the student or sponsor.
10.4 Housing

Exchange students will be provided with standard student accommodation provided by the Host
Institution. Such accommodation may be provided at a cost. Students are expected to abide by all the rules and regulations pertaining to the accommodation provided by the Host Institution.
10.5 Student Support

The International Development Department at Botho University will provide support to students on the exchange programme in addition to standard support provided by the relevant Faculty. Exchange students from partner institutions studying at Botho University during the exchange programme will receive a formal student identity card valid for the duration of the exchange programme. Participation of students with special needs is possible subject to the ability of the Host Institution to support such students adequately
10.6 Discipline

Exchange students will be required to abide by the rules and regulations of the Host Institution and country. Exchange students who contravene any rule or regulation of the Host Institution are subject to disciplinary procedures as set out under the Host Institution’s rules and regulations, and in addition may also be subject to disciplinary procedures at their Home Institution.

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