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Royal Commission on Safety in Mines

In: Other Topics

Submitted By micro905
Words 2411
Pages 10
Chapter 1—Introduction

MULTIPLE CHOICE

1. Which of the following occupational illnesses have been around since ancient Egyptian times?
a.|skin diseases |
b.|liver diseases |
c.|respiratory problems|
d.|lung diseases|

ANS: c
PTS: 1
REF: p. 6
BLM: Remember

2. Which of the following was articulated by the 1974 Royal Commission on Safety in Mines?
a.|requirement for mandatory inspections|
b.|standards for ventilation|
c.|system of compensation for injured workers|
d.|rights of workers|

ANS: d
PTS: 1
REF: p. 7
BLM: Remember

3. Which of the following is an example of an employer’s responsibility under OH&S legislation?
a.|providing financial support for injured workers |
b.|cleaning up the workplace before an inspection |
c.|conducting research on health and safety issues|
d.|preparing a written occupational health and safety policy |

ANS: d
PTS: 1
REF: p. 12
BLM: Remember

4. According to the text, what was the primary reason that supervisors on construction sites underestimated health and safety risks?
a.|They could not recognize unsafe conditions. |
b.|They believed that risks were unavoidable.|
c.|They had not experienced any recent accidents.|
d.|They were obsessed with meeting deadlines. |

ANS: a
PTS: 1
REF: p. 12
BLM: Remember

5. Which of the following is an economic benefit of effective OH&S programs?
a.|a reduction in lost-time costs|
b.|greater due diligence by employers |
c.|workers look out for the safety of their coworkers |
d.|improved health and safety provisions during collective bargaining|

ANS: a
PTS: 1
REF: p. 4
BLM: Remember

6. Given that injuries and illnesses stem from what workers “do” on the job, why is OH&S not managed by the production/operations function?
a.|Safety is primarily a labour relations issue.|
b.|Safety requires compliance with labour law.|
c.|Safety is an...

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