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Rural Development Policy of Ethiopia with Particular Emphasis on: Market-Led Agricultural Development Strategy

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Rural Development policy of Ethiopia with particular emphasis on: Market-led agricultural development strategy

A term paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the course GaDS 503 Development Perspectives and Political theories.

By: Nardos Legesse

School of Governance and Development Studies College of Law and Governance (M.A Development Management)
Hawassa University
Hawassa

January, 2013

List of contents

Contents page
1. Introduction………………………………………………………………………………….…1
2. Working towards market led agricultural development……………………………………….2
2.1 Agricultural developments- key to poverty reduction………………………………...2
2.2 Agricultural development not driven by market forces can’t be rapid and sustainable.3
2.3 The role of markets in productivity of agricultural sector …………………………... 4
2.4 Building an agricultural marketing system…………………………………………....5
2.4.1 Grading agricultural product……………………………………………..….5
2.4.2 Provision of market information………………………………………...…..5
2.4.3 Promoting cooperatives………………………………………………….….6
2.4.4 Promoting the participation of private capital in agricultural marketing…....6
2.5 Tuning Ethiopian agricultural sector towards market oriented production…………..7
3. Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………………...…8
Notes………………………………………………………………………………………………9
References

1. Introduction
Rural development can be broadly defined as all aspects of…...

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