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Russian

In: Business and Management

Submitted By zyin891231
Words 977
Pages 4
As it stated in the case, there are many factors contribute to the brand equity of Russian Standard. At first, Tariko’s personal experiences in his early entrepreneurial time helped him accumulate many professional knowledges on wine industry in Russian, which contributes to the brand equity. For example, Tariko was a representative from Martini & Rossi before, and he actually seize the opportunity created by the supply/demand gap at that time, which made him became an exclusive imported in Russia at that time. Two years later, his company had established itself as Russia’s leading importer of upmarket alcoholic drinks, which it helped raise his brand awareness. Moreover, Tariko also developed strong and commanding merchandising skills and relationships with the trade to enhance its marketing strategy on brand equity. For instance, Tariko worked with international advertising experts and brand identity agencies to conduct a survey on the essence of the brand, so that the brand equity could be conveyed to the consumers at last. In result, several methods that meetings with notable Russian and literary personalities, extensive travel throughout Russia, customer focus groups and numerous brand essence and positioning briefs were born to enhance the brand equity in short. After that, Tariko’s brand was able to enjoy rapid success in Russia because the consistency of Tariko’s mission and his company’s marketing strategy. To produce world-class quality vodka while retaining the unmistakably Russian identity was Tariko’s mission, and his company executed this goal by distinguishing two categories of consumers accurately to target the right customer segments, working on the product formula to generate outstanding quality of vodka, implementing meticulous detail on packaging to conveyed the premium image of the brand, applying lower price than competitors to enhance...

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