Samsung's Corporate Strategy

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Samsung's Corporate Strategy
 Every day, our people bring this philosophy to life. Our leaders search for the brightest talent from around the world, and give them the resources they need to be the best at what they do.
 And that's what making a better global society is all about.
 The result is that all of our products-from memory chips that help businesses store vital knowledge to mobile phones that connect people across continents- have the power to enrich lives.
 We believe that living by strong values is the key to good business. At Samsung, a rigorous code of conduct and these core values are at the heart of every decision we make.
 Everything we do at Samsung is driven by an unyielding passion for excellence—and an unfaltering commitment to develop the best products and services on the market.
 In today's fast-paced global economy, change is constant and innovation is critical to a company's survival.
 As we have done for 70 years, we set our sights on the future, anticipating market needs and demands so we can steer our company toward long-term success.
 A business cannot be successful unless it creates prosperity and opportunity for others. Samsung is dedicated to being a socially and environmentally responsible corporate citizen in every community where we operate around the globe.
 Operating in an ethical way is the foundation of our business. Everything we do is guided by a moral compass that ensures fairness, respect for all stakeholders and complete transparency.…...

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