Sarbanes Oxley

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What is the purpose of the Sarbanes Oxley Act?

LIB100, Class Section

Quincy Leon

Professor Kahn

Fall 2011









Topic: What is the purpose of the Sarbanes Oxley Act?

Thesis statement:
Patients who suffer from depression often think that they are faced with two treatment options. They can participate in psychotherapy and/or they can take a regimen of psychotropic medication. It is important for mental health practitioners to impress upon their patients that 30 minutes of moderate exercise performed 4 times a week can also lift their mood and play a role in their recovery.
Search strategy and evaluation of resources:
I began my research on the purpose of the Sarbanes Oxley act by searching the ASA library online catalog for books that spoke mainly about that topic. I chose the ASA library because it is a college library; it only contains books or articles that are meant for research. Also, the library contains credible sources necessary for a research project.
I chose two books to use for my research. The first being Sarbanes-Oxley act of 2002: Law and Explanation. I chose this book because it is considered to be an authoritative source which contains the necessary background information one would need at the commencement of a research project.
The next book I chose was Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002: Conference Report. I chose this book it too spoke primarily about the SOX Act. This report is authoritative because it is written by the United States Congress also indicating that it is a credible source.
Finally, I searched a discussion website on the Sarbanes and Oxley Act to see different views on the law, and came across a PDF copy of the actual Sarbanes Oxley Act. I chose to use the site because I knew it would have credible information and data about the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. In addition, the PDF document of the SOX Act is a…...

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