Premium Essay

School Culture

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By Papiete
Words 274
Pages 2
School Culture Analysis The term school culture describes the environment that affects the behavior of the entire school community. School culture can be defined as the quality and character of school life. It is based on patterns of school life experiences and reflects norms, goals, values, relationships, teaching, leadership practices and the structure of the organization. Several studies have concurred that student performance is directly related to school climate. Students in schools with a positive school culture have higher achievements. Therefore, creating and maintaining a positive school culture should be essential to the role of school administrator. Good schools depend on a strong sense of purpose and leadership (MacNeil & Maclin, n.d.). Principals must steer their staff, students, and community in a common direction in an effort to establish a set of norms, goals, and objectives that describes their vision of learning and the overall objective of the school. A school administrator has a strong influence on shaping a schools culture (MacNeil & Maclin). Once a strong school culture is established, it tends to act as a powerful socializer of thought and programmer of behavior (MacNeil & Maclin). Yet, shaping and creating such a culture does not just inexplicably happen. It requires a negotiation of sentiments of school stakeholders (MacNeil & Maclin). When points of view and beliefs compete in schools, deciding which ones are relevant can cause struggling. Principals are in an advantageous position to influence the outcome of this conflict (MacNeil & Maclin). When establishing a school culture, a principal must be able to infuse varying values, beliefs, ideas, theories and decisions into their school (MacNeil & Maclin, n.d.). Creating a collaborative community is...

Similar Documents

Premium Essay

School Culture and Student Prformance

...Quezon City SCHOOL CULTURE AND STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT IN MATHEMATICS Presented by: Macaraeg, Emmerson C. Pelo, Emelani G. Reyes, Lovely Mar L. Salamat, Sarah M. to: Mr. Ruben E. Faltado III November 18, 2011 Introduction For over thirty years, the effect of schooling on student performance has been one of the major themes in educational research. Coleman’s study on equality of educational opportunity in the United States (Coleman, Campbell, Hobson, McPartland, Mood, Weinfeld & York, 1966) is often conceived as the starting point of what became later known as the school effectiveness research tradition (see, e.g. Creemers, 1994a; Scheerens & Bosker, 1997; Teddlie & Reynolds, 2000a). Considerations of the ways in which issues of culture show up in the Math classroom are central to each of the analytic planes. The Math classroom is the local site through which the culture system of Math education is enacted where particular types of Math knowing are privilege over others and where cultural enterprise of Math learning plays out in interactional space. School culture plays a vital role in student’s achievement in Mathematics. This study aims to offer a thoughtful treatment of the role of culture in teaching and learning of Mathematics and synthesize literature that is relevant to this concern from multiple sub discipline in education. The concept of culture refers to a group’s shared beliefs, customs, and behavior. A school’s culture includes......

Words: 707 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

School Culture Analysis

...Running head: SCHOOL CULTURE ANALYSIS School Culture Analysis Lisa Mack Grand Canyon University EDA 529 Dr. Tony Elmer July 21, 2009 School Culture Analysis The term school culture describes the environment that affects the behavior of the entire school community. School culture can be defined as the quality and character of school life. It is based on patterns of school life experiences and reflects norms, goals, values, relationships, teaching, leadership practices and the structure of the organization. Several studies have concurred that student performance is directly related to school climate. Students in schools with a positive school culture have higher achievements. Therefore, creating and maintaining a positive school culture should be essential to the role of school administrator. Good schools depend on a strong sense of purpose and leadership (MacNeil & Maclin, n.d.). Principals must steer their staff, students, and community in a common direction in an effort to establish a set of norms, goals, and objectives that describes their vision of learning and the overall objective of the school. A school administrator has a strong influence on shaping a schools culture (MacNeil & Maclin). Once a strong school culture is established, it tends to act as a powerful socializer of thought and programmer of behavior (MacNeil & Maclin). Yet, shaping and creating such a culture does not just inexplicably happen. It requires a......

Words: 1652 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

School Culture Triage Survey

...What is culture School Culture There are various aspects to consider when developing a positive school culture. Deal and Peterson (1999, 2002) extensively researched this field and identified four key elements that promote and foster a positive culture: 1) vision and values 2) rituals and ceremonies 3) history and stories 4) architecture, artefacts, and symbols A school’s vision and values are identified through its mission and purpose; the heart and soul of a school’s culture (Deal & Peterson, 1999, 2002; MacNeil, 2005). In the 2010 inspection HMIE noted that "St Andrew's and St Bride's High School has a clear and confident sense of direction, based on its strong Catholic ethos, inclusive values, well established climate of achievement and culture of continuous improvement." Although the "Charter for Catholic Schools in Scotland" mission statement hangs prominently outside the Head Teachers office the true mission and purpose of our school is revealed through the actions, motivations, attitudes, and daily behaviour of the staff, pupils and parents. Rituals and ceremonies make up the second element of Deal and Peterson’s (1999; 2002) creation of a positive school culture. Whereas vision and values lay the groundwork in the establishment of a school’s shared mission and purpose, rituals and ceremonies are designed to afford school member’s time to “keep us connected, foster renewal, and provide opportunities to bond with others” while......

Words: 1902 - Pages: 8

Premium Essay

Qualitative Study: How Does School Culture Influence Teacher Retention

...A qualitative study by Watts (2016) addressed what conditions contribute to the retention of teachers in rural school districts. Watts uses three guiding question that are in what ways do professional relationships influence teacher retention, how does school culture impact teacher retention, and what conditions outside of school influence teacher retention. The participants in this study are employed within the three rural counties in eastern Kentucky from November 2015 to February 2016. The counties that participated are Fairfield, Laurens, and Pickens. The superintendent and two principals from each district were invited to participate in individual interviews. The two types of interview Watts used was semi-structured individual interviews...

Words: 412 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

The Administrator's Role in School Culture

...Administrator’s Role in School Culture NAME Grand Canyon University: UNV 501 04/24/2013 The Administrator’s Role in School Culture “School culture has been described as being similar to the air we breathe. No one notices it unless it becomes foul” (Freiberg, 1998). Culture within schools can create an environment where learning is positive, or it can put serious constraints on the school’s ability to function. Whether you work in a school, in a doctor’s office, or in a major company, employees prefer to work in an environment that is engaging and fulfilling. How does a principal create an environment conducive to learning in today’s society? After reading my articles and reflecting on my own experience, a principal’s role and responsibility in a school is multifaceted. A principal must guarantee classroom instruction is aligned to state standards, design instruction that promotes student success in the 21st century, maintain improvements on the campus, develop meaningful partnerships with all stakeholders; all while developing a culture where everyone feels appreciated. An effective principal has many roles and responsibilities while creating an environment that encourages learning and is engaging for students, teachers and staff. Without a doubt, a principal must embrace all of these roles and responsibilities as they are important factors in leading a school to produce positive results. However, creating a positive culture in school is imperative in......

Words: 539 - Pages: 3

Premium Essay

Ed 673 School Culture Scenarios

...ED 673 School Culture | Follow-Up #2 | Scenario Responses | | Nan Kane | 0/29/2013 | | Scenario #1: Part A: Description of School Culture Issues The key school culture issue in scenario #1 is that the team is an interdisciplinary team that is not function as such. They have been together for six years and works like a “well-oiled machine. It is obvious that the team has worked through the four stages of group development because they have addressed the social, emotional, and developmental needs of their students. The team has the cornerstones for effective collaboration and teamwork People, Task and Process (Conzemius and O’Neill, 2002). They have the leadership, commitment, knowledge, and skills. The team has made decisions, problem solved, communicated, and met. They also accomplished certain goals. Productive collaboration takes both purpose and skill to be effective (Conzemius and O’Neill, 2002). The team has demonstrated the ability to create and implement a plan for addressing the emotional, social and developmental needs of students. However, they are not clear about their purpose that was set by the principal to integrate instruction among the disciplines. Part B: Immediate Actions I will meet with the principal, which I view as someone having expert power. He has experience and expertise in the area of working with teams. We will discuss what I observed in the team meetings and come to a consensus to form new 7th grade......

Words: 1402 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Birmingham School Case Study

...Frankfurt School and the Birmingham School cultural studies approach to the “commodification of culture, as articulated by the Birmingham School versus the political economic one proposed by the Frankfurt School” (Gunster, 2007). According to the Birmingham School, culture and politics are separated into different spheres. Bound within the political arena are the culture influences and leadership support structures within society. As well as these areas, the economic power of this undertaking is carried out through political activity and not through the cultural sphere. It is through political activity that economic control develops into a vast social and cultural leadership....

Words: 859 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Cultural Perception

...Cultural Perceptions of Intelligence Marilyn Raleigh Dr. Castleberry March 20, 2015 The two cultures I selected to compare how each receives intelligence are the United States and Ghana. The American culture is more of an individualistic culture. There are many different cultures within the American culture. American culture holds values of religion, family, and morality; however these beliefs aren’t collective where each individual in America may hold a different view of these specific values (Verdem, 2013). The advancement in an individualistic society is placed on the individual goals and desires as opposed to what might be best for one’s society .Individuals in a collectivist .culture such as Ghana focus on the well -being and what will benefit the greater need of society. America Individualistic Culture There are many different cultures within the American culture. American culture holds values of religion, family, and morality; however these beliefs aren’t collective where each individual in America may hold a different view of these specific values (Verdem, 2013). .Americans has been exposed to many types of intelligent tests. Basic skills are given yearly to determine how much children are learning through the school system or if home schooled. College students must take SAT and ACT tests and obtain a certain percentage score for admission. Technology has impacted America; through computers, cell ......

Words: 1201 - Pages: 5

Premium Essay

Culture

...Be aware of the ways your own culture influences your expectations of children. Consider the cultural backgrounds of the children in your setting and their community. Learn about the cultures from which the children in your program or school may come. Use your basic knowledge of the culture to talk with each family about its values and practices. Build on what you have learned from each family. Infuse the curriculum and classroom environment with a rich variety of materials from the cultures of your children as well as other cultures. Culture is illustrated daily when the doors of the school are opened. The youth enter into the environment with all the happenings going on at home to a safe environment of school excepted to detach and focus on school. The culture of the school varies from year to year depending on the population. For example, a teacher could have a classroom of 25 students. 15 of them can be females and 10 can be males. 5 could be White, 6 Hispanic, 3 Black, and 11 White. But the next year her entire cultured could be altered because her population has changed. As a teacher I have to be flexible and get to know my students. By doing this I will be able to become aware of the students needs and be able to service them better through the curriculum. Learning the culture of the school and the neighborhood in which I work helps the school to develop better programs and issue better support to their students. When you know the culture your students feel the......

Words: 268 - Pages: 2

Premium Essay

Residential Schools In Canada

...Summary: Two key objectives of the residential school system were to remove and isolate children from the influence of their homes, families, traditions, and cultures, and to also make them adapt to the dominant culture. These objectives were created based on the theory of the aboriginal cultures and spiritual beliefs of the, being unworthy and unequal. It was infamously dais to “kill the Indian in the child”. Initially, about 1,100 students attended 69 schools across the country. In 1931, at the peak of the residential school system, there were about 80 schools operating in Canada. There were a total of about 130 schools in every territory and province except Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick from the earliest in the 19th...

Words: 792 - Pages: 4

Premium Essay

Persuasive Essay On Residential Schools

...Residential schools Residential schools represented the greatest form of abuse against the Indians by the government in the name of civilizing and assimilating them into Eurocentric values. This system of industrial schools was modeled along Carlisle Indian School in Pennsylvania whose intention was to alienate entire generations of Indian children from their language and culture. Indian children were taken away from their parents, relatives, friends, and communities to residential schools where they lost their culture and ability to communicate in the native tongue. This system of residential school has been equated to cultural genocide. The 1876 Indian Act gave the government the responsibility for native education and residential school...

Words: 1179 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Diversity

...Matt Cagle, Stephanie Snyder, Jessica Johnson, Sarah Haddox Abercrombie EDUC 2312.01 19 October 2013 Culture Diversity in the Classroom What is culture? Culture is “the quality in a person or society that arises from a concern for what is regarded as excellent in arts, manners, and scholarly pursuits.” (Dictionary.com) What does culture look like in the classroom? When viewing culture from a teacher’s perspective, it can be broken down into four different categories such as, religion, ethnicity, language, and economic status. These categories can help to define a classrooms culture. Our goal is to examine how culture, broken into these four categories, is viewed in the classroom. Race and Ethnicity(Sarah): In a classroom, a teacher will come across a variety of different races and ethnicities. Race refers to the physical attributes associated with certain groups, such as Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic, African American, etc. Ethnicity is the specific groups within a race. For example, within the Caucasian race, you will find the Irish, French, German, etc. Also associated with ethnicity are the societal characteristics for each group within a race such as language and religious beliefs. In a classroom with multiple races and ethnicities, comes a wide range of religious backgrounds, languages, holidays, and customs. This can prove to have both positive and negative aspects within a classroom environment. Positive things that can come from a large collection of racial......

Words: 1095 - Pages: 5

Free Essay

Culture

...An Investigation of How Culture Shapes Curriculum in Early Care and Education Programs on a Native American Indian Reservation ‘‘The drum is considered the heartbeat of the community’’ Jennifer L. Gilliard1,3 and Rita A. Moore2 This article investigates how culture shapes instruction in three early care and education programs on the Flathead Indian Reservation. Interviews with eight early childhood teachers as well as classroom observations were conducted. The investigation is framed by the following research question: How does the culture of the family and community shape curriculum? Data analysis suggested that ongoing communication with parents and community about teaching within a culturally relevant context, building a sense of belongingness and community through ritual, and respecting children, families, and community were essential to defining the Native American Indian culture within these early learning programs. KEY WORDS: culture; in; tribal; early; education; programs. INTRODUCTION Instruction informed by children’s home and community culture is critical to supporting a sense of belongingness that ultimately impacts academic achievement (Banks, 2002; Osterman, 2000). American school populations are increasingly diversified with immigrants and English language learners; but American teachers are over 90% European American (Nieto, 2000). Educators who are from different cultural perspectives than those present in the families and communities of the children......

Words: 5663 - Pages: 23

Premium Essay

Examining the Change Process in a Vocational College in Chicago

...most often do not adopt formal change models in their organizational cultures, change models manifest themselves in modified versions consistent with those that have already been researched. A vocational college in downtown Chicago, Illinois has a change model process which resembles the complexity model. The complexity model of organizational fits closely with the culture of the vocational college. The outcomes resulting from this change model vary. Inhibitors to the change process have stifled change progression in this organization. Change agents in the organization are not readily identifiable making it tough to determining who leads change in the vocational college. This composition will examine the aforementioned aspects of the change process as it relates to the vocational college in detail. Conclusions drawn from this analysis will be based on how it compares to using other change models found in research. A more stable and formal change model might be more effective in this vocational college. If the organization sticks to its current change model, success can be realized if all essential steps are complete. Background on the Change Process The vocational college has recently faced mandatory new construction in the English as a Second Language department of the college. The new construction has forced the college to become denser concerning classroom space. This has caused the other three schools in the college (healthcare, business, and networking) to incur......

Words: 1365 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Intelligence Testing Article Analysis

...people who were white rather than people who were black. In this paper the author will review several different articles that are related to intelligence testing. The definition of intelligence may vary among the different cultures (Rogoff, 1990). An example of the differences among cultures and the way they view intelligence is European Americans think of intelligence in technical skills terms whereas people that are from Kenya consider intelligence to be someone who is an active participant in family and social life. Another example of the way culture views intelligence is people from Uganda view someone as being intelligent if they know the right thing to do and then they follow through with the right actions. Another example is the of the variations on how intelligence is viewed from culture to culture is the latmu people that are from Papua New Guinea, they believe people who have the ability to remember 10, 000 to 20,000 clans as intelligent. The people of the Carolina Island people believe that people who can use the stars to navigate are intelligent. Intelligence testing can be vary cultural bias at times. A great example of how intelligence testing can be cultural bias is the example of Gregory Ochoa. While Gregory Ochoa was in high school him and his fellow classmates were all given an IQ test. Gregory did not speak or understand very much English and at home he spoke in...

Words: 846 - Pages: 4