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Search and Seizure

In: Historical Events

Submitted By addysmom
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Search and Seizure in America
CJA/364
February 10, 2015

Search and Seizure in America
The fourth amendment has given us the protection against unreasonable search and seizure but what exactly does that mean? To understand, one must define right of privacy, search, seizure, arrest, and reasonableness and how each of these relates to stop and frisk, automotive search rules, and requirements regarding border and regulatory searches. Have you ever been stopped on the street or anywhere and frisked by a police officer? Individuals should be aware of the rules regarding such a situation.
In the state of New York, the people, "Mayor Michael Bloomberg" (Wells 2013, p. 1) and the district court judge "Shira Scheindlin" (Wells 2013) argued about reforming the stop and frisk policy. The objective issues in improving system addressed after a stop and frisk case won by the arrestee. In the case involving the arrestee "David Ourlicht" (Whitaker, 2013, p. 1) claimed he was wrongfully stopped and frisked. The officer stopped and frisked the defendant because the object in his pocket resembled a gun. The attorney representing the defendant argued his constitutional rights, and the stop and frisk was unconstitutional. The environment of the Missouri cities, counties, suburbs, and rural area are subject to society socialization, private activity, and deviant behavior which may cause the proper authority to respond to the nature of the action the same as in New York City. Society plays a significant role to deter activity that may lead to an arrest. Every law enforcement jurisdiction has wrongful destructive activity of character in plain view sight. The rights of privacy in society governed by the protection of “The First amendment” (Allmendinger, 2009, p. 1), 4th, 5th, and 14th amendment. Abnormal behavior in any society environment could get a response from the law...

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