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Second Languages and Australian Schooling

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Australian Education Review

Second Languages and Australian Schooling
Joseph Lo Bianco with Yvette Slaughter

Australian Council for Educational Research

First published 2009 by ACER Press Australian Council for Educational Research 19 Prospect Hill Road, Camberwell, Victoria, 3124 Copyright © 2009 Australian Council for Educational Research All rights reserved. Except under the conditions described in the Copyright Act 1968 of Australia and subsequent amendments, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the written permission of the publishers. Edited by Carolyn Glascodine Cover illustration by ACER Project Publishing Typeset by ACER Project Publishing Printed by BPA Print Group National Library of Australia Cataloguing-in-Publication entry Author: Title: ISBN: Series: Notes: Subjects: Lo Bianco, Joseph. Second languages and Australian schooling / Joseph Lo Bianco ; Yvette Slaughter. 9780864318374 (pbk) Australian education review ; 54. Bibliography. Language and languages--Study and teaching--Australia. Language and languages--Study and teaching—Bilingual method. Education, Bilingual--Australia.

Other Authors/Contributors: Slaughter, Yvette. Australian Council for Educational Research. Dewey Number: 370.11750994 Visit our website: www.acer.edu.au Acknowledgment The Author and Series Editor wish to acknowledge the contribution of Dr Yvette Slaughter, Senior Research Fellow, School of Languages and Linguistics, Univerity of Melbourne. Section 4 built upon her earlier text and work, where she assembled the data and developed the tables. She assisted in the negotiations with MCEETYA and also provided invaluable commentary in her reviewing of drafts.

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