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Segregation

In: Social Issues

Submitted By mahira
Words 462
Pages 2
Introduction

Almost all of us are born into a world where we readily have someone to follow or obey. When we are kids we look to our parents for guidance and for direction. When we grow up and enter an institution called “school” we learn to obey and listen to our teachers. And that guidance carries on until we finish an undergraduate degree at which point we are at an age at which we are considered an adult, capable of making our own decisions. However, even at that age we still tend to obey the norms set by society, which is to work. And yet again we enter a stage in our life, where we have to obey the rules set by an employer or company. One can even go, as far as to say, obedience is part of human nature. Even if we as humans pride ourselves in our knowledge, we constantly acknowledge the fact that there will ultimately always be someone who will know and understand something better than us.

I find this whole notion of obedience very fascinating. I grew up in a very multi-cultural environment and through my experience with various nationalities I have noticed that the constant need for direction and reassurance is an innate quality in all human beings but it’s a more dominant quality in some people than in others. My research aims to answer the question: Why are Asians, particularly South Asians such as Indians, more prone to be obedient than other nationals? Based on the aforementioned question and my personal observation, I derived a hypothesis: Indians are more prone to remain silent when someone cuts in front of them in a waiting line. Why? Environment and society play major roles in shaping a persons character.
The British have colonized India in specific for almost 100 years. India had lived under the British rules and regulations and was forced into complete submission.
I presume the fact that they were oppressed for so long has made them...

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