Semiotics

In: People

Submitted By nickbrain
Words 665
Pages 3
The circumstance in which semiotics are translated by humans occurs in many different variations. A broad definition comes from Umberto Eco, who said this 'semiotics is concerned with everything that can be taken as a sign' (Eco 1976, 7). Semiotics undertakes the application of viewing what we accredit as 'signs' in everyday speech, as well as anything which 'stands for' something else. It involves looking at all processes of information’s exchanges as far as signs are involved. Its quite complex as humans have the ability to communicate in many different forms, ranging from talk, text, smell, write, sing and body language. There is a primary hypothesis that ‘All symbolic systems in a culture act as a second language or text’(Innis 1986, 21). Then we place signs and boundaries to allow communication between two people. People are continuously generating and interpreting cues and codes. Even if, you don’t think your communicating, sign processes are always ongoing. As Saussure noted in his work both sound and thought were ‘intimately linked’, with ‘each triggering the other upon being heard’(Chandler 2007, 17). Semiosis was a term which has been taken from Charles Pierce, and latter used by Umberto Eco and he defined it as ‘The action where a culture produces signs and attributes meaning to the signs’(Eco 1976, 11). This has then allowed subjective matter to invade each individual act of semiosis

Semiotics is closely linked to film as well, ‘A language, is semiotic process where thought maybe conveyed, however a language system allows a answer for a thought utilizing varying degrees and types of signs and signifiers produced by the



language’(Stam 1992, 49). When watching a film its not only the language in which we are looking and listening to, the director uses various angles, speeds and shots. While the audience will react to the movies semantic intent,…...

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