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MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROGRAM
Arizona State University

GENERAL STUDENT
INFORMATION MANUAL

MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROGRAM
Arizona State University
PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT FOR THE
MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROGRAM

The profession which you are entering is dedicated to one major purpose, the welfare of the patient. The laboratory is that part of the health care team which serves the primary function of assisting the physician in the diagnosis and treatment of disease by means of qualitative and quantitative analysis of body fluids and tissues. The responsibility of the laboratory is to provide the physician with reliable laboratory data, always cognizant of the primary concern, the
PATIENT. At times, the convenience and private life of each laboratory professional and student must be of secondary concern. The patient's needs continue day and night, weekends and holidays, and must be met by all health care professionals. A career in the Medical Laboratory
Sciences demands your time, your sincere efforts and your sympathetic interest in other people.
These demands must be met by you in a mature and responsible manner.
Your education in the Professional Study Program will be a challenging and rewarding experience. By applying for this program of study you have indicated your sincere desire to become a competent Medical Laboratory Scientist. You have been accepted as a student in the
Arizona State University Medical Laboratory Sciences Program because of your qualifications and potential. The faculty and clinical laboratory staff will do their utmost to provide you with a well-rounded program of instruction and experience and are more than willing to give as much individual help as possible. In turn, your PRIMARY FOCUS must be your professional studies.
This program is in the process of being accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for
Clinical Laboratory Sciences and designed to graduate only well qualified Medical Laboratory
Scientists. For this reason, the program is not an easy one. As a Medical Laboratory professional you will be responsible for the tasks outlined in the accompanying Program Mission and Goals, Career-Entry Competencies, Essential Functions and Scope of Practice. In order to satisfactorily fulfill all of the necessary requirements, your wholehearted interest, attention and efforts must be focused on this period of education. In some instances, you will find it necessary to sacrifice your own personal plans or conveniences to meet the demands of your assignments.
Professional conduct is just as important as the technical aspects of your education. The following remarks will aid you in developing and assimilating the qualities associated with
Clinical Laboratory Scientists.
During the past few years, you have had the status of a college student -- a person completing your formal education in preparation for entering the professional world. During the next 16 months you will be in a new phase of your education. Even though you are on the Arizona State
University campus your status is now one of a professional person with commensurate responsibilities. The same holds true when you are attending the Medical Laboratory
Applications Courses at our Clinical Affiliates. Always bear in mind, no matter where you happen to be, that you are representatives of your chosen profession, upon which your actions reflect, favorably or unfavorably.
A.
Professional Appearance
Every endeavor should be made to display professional pride to patients, their families and other health care workers. Certainly, personal appearance plays a big part in this

effort. People judge us to a large extent -- and they will judge the hospital/institution we represent -- by our appearance. It is for this reason that guidelines for dress and grooming have been established. Every person who represents the Medical Laboratory
Sciences Program is required to comply with this code. In addition to professional pride, safety precautions dictate various dress code requirements.
Individuals are expected to exercise good judgment in choosing their apparel. The primary criteria are that the apparel be neat, clean, in good taste and reflect a professional image. Conservative make-up, perfume, jewelry and fingernail polish are acceptable.
Hair must be neat, clean, and appropriately secured so as not to fall over the face.
Dress Attire Requirements are:
1.

Street Clothes with a Professional Appearance
Pants are to be of conservative color and design, and should be no shorter than knee length. Denim and scrubs are allowed for on-campus courses. Sweat suits, pants with elastic cuffs, and tank tops are not permitted.
Dress and skirt hemlines should be no shorter than knee length.

2.

Shoes/Hosiery
Hosiery and shoes must be appropriate, clean, in good repair and meet the safety and noise abatement needs of a health care environment.
For safety and health purposes flat, closed shoes (no open weaving or holes) must be worn in the lab at all times. This excludes clogs, canvas and high heeled shoes/boots. Leather/vinyl athletic shoes are acceptable. Shoes may be stored in a designated locker.

3.

Lab Coats

A knee-length white lab coat (not jacket) must be worn at all times in the laboratory. For safety purposes, this coat must be fully buttoned. Lab coats will remain in each laboratory and should be taken home periodically for laundering per safety precautions standards.

Dress attire requirements for off-campus courses, Medical Laboratory Applications, may vary.

B.

Safety
Students will follow all safety guidelines outlined in the ASU Program Safety Manual and adhere to safety policies in the clinical affiliates.
You have an obligation to patients, fellow students, instructors and yourself to exercise caution in your duties. You should strive to be alert to any hazardous condition and report it immediately to your instructors.
In case of fire or smoke in any classroom or laboratory pull the alarm located at the hallway entrances and call 911 to report the situation. Then use the fire extinguisher, if appropriate. C.

Ethics
When errors are made, be sure to inform your instructor. Do not hide or cover up mistakes. They can seriously affect the patient. It is far better to admit a mistake so that corrective measures can be taken as soon as possible.
Patient information is privileged and is not to be discussed with others.
Laboratory findings are confidential medical information and must not be discussed with, or transmitted to, unauthorized personnel.

D.

Etiquette
Be considerate of those around you. There are numerous habits (such as pencil-tapping, humming and whistling) which can be distracting and annoying to others. All cell phones must be in OFF position.
A quiet atmosphere must prevail in the classroom and laboratory. Visiting with other students or friends during scheduled class hours is not allowed. One of the keys to good work is concentration, and it is difficult, if not impossible, to keep your mind on what you are doing if someone is visiting with you.

E.

Class Attendance
Due to the professional nature of the curriculum, class attendance is mandatory. Any student with excessive absences will be put on a deficiency status (see Deficiency Status, pg. 12). If you are absent, you are required to make up the work on your own time, depending on availability of instructor time and resources. Excessive absences/tardies will be reviewed by the Standards Committee and will result in a course grade being lowered by as much as 3%. In addition, excessive absences/tardies will result in a deficiency status per guidelines below:
1. Absence
An excused absence can be due to illness, a death in the family, or some other pressing reason as determined by the instructor. The student must call the instructor as soon as possible, but no later than 8:00 am on the day of the absence
(see Directory, pg. 5). The student needs to call each day of the absence, unless otherwise arranged.
Unexcused absences are defined as all other absences that do not meet the above definition. Absences that are not reported within policy guidelines are unexcused

absences. Unexcused absences are considered a serious violation of professional behavior and more than two unexcused absences will result in a deficiency status.
2. Tardiness
Punctuality demonstrates professional responsibility. Late arrivals are disruptive to the class and disrespectful to the instructor. When you are going to be late, you must notify the instructor and state the approximate time of arrival (see Directory, pg. 5).
Tardiness is a form of unexcused absence. Unless there are extenuating circumstances, two (2) instances of tardiness are equivalent to one unexcused absence, which can lead to a deficiency status.
You are responsible for arranging reliable transportation, dependable childcare if applicable, and appropriate work schedules to meet the attendance requirements.
Note: During the Medical Laboratory Applications courses (off-campus), you may have to begin as early as 5:30 a.m. in selected locations. In other locations you may have to stay as late as 5:30 p.m. An evening shift may be available in a few selected sites.
F.

Intolerable Behavior Resulting In Automatic Dismissal
The following behaviors will result in the student's automatic dismissal from the
Program:
(1)
The use of illicit drugs or alcohol during school hours
(2)
While taking examinations
a.
Talking to other students.
b.
Use of outside aids (unauthorized formula sheets, crib sheets, cell phones, etc.)
c.
Any behavior which might reasonably be interpreted as cheating (for example, staring at another person's test).
(3)
Dishonest reporting of laboratory results

G.

Care of Equipment/Laboratory
The accuracy of the determinations you perform depends upon both proper technique and well-maintained equipment. If either is lacking, the results of the test are compromised.
The equipment should be kept clean and in good working order. Whether you use a pipette, a microscope or a spectrophotometer, it is a necessary part of the determination which you are doing. Handle all apparatus carefully. Repair or replacement of damaged equipment is often both expensive and time-consuming, as the item, however large or small, may not be readily available. Students who cause extensive damage or breakage to lab equipment will be assessed a fine.

H.

Help keep the laboratory a clean and pleasant place to work; you will soon find that neatness and the proper placement of equipment are definite assets in the performance of your work. The janitor's duty only entails cleaning the floor and emptying the waste baskets; therefore, a number of nontechnical tasks are the responsibility of the laboratory personnel. Put reagents, supplies and equipment in their proper place and clean up your work area.
Standard Procedures
Follow laboratory procedures meticulously. Do not make arbitrary changes in any procedure. Behind each step is a definite reason for its inclusion at that point.

Remember, if you fail to follow instructions and procedures exactly, you are endangering the health of the patient, yourself and others.
I.

Student-Faculty Communications
Students are encouraged to communicate any concerns, problems or complaints with the appropriate faculty member. If resolution is unsatisfactory, students are encouraged to discuss these issues with the Program Director.

J.

Work/Course Schedules
Because this program is very intense and requires extensive at home study, outside employment or registration for other courses may interfere with your academic achievement. Therefore, you must discuss these schedules with the Program Director each semester. (Refer to Additional Semester Activities form.) Each student's situation will be monitored on an individual basis.
K. Health Insurance/Immunization Record
You are required to carry hospitalization/health insurance. The name of your insurance carrier and policy number will be needed. In addition, proof of various immunizations will also be required. Refer to Medical Information Record form.

L.

Criminal Background Check and Drug Testing
Students must have a Criminal Background Check and Drug Testing prior to clinical rotations. Directory:
Jeffrey Wolz, MA, MT(ASCP)
Program Director, Faculty
602-285-7865
jwolz@asu.edu
Ruth Spates, MT (ASCP), SH
Adjunct Faculty
Ruth.Spates@asu.edu
Ronald Solano, MLS (ASCP)
Adjunct Faculty
Ronald.Solano@asu.edu
Wesley Candelaria, MS, CLS-Microbiology (ASCP)
Adjunct Faculty
Wesley.Candelaria@asu.edu
Sherry Gamble, MS, CLS-Microbiology (ASCP)
Adjunct Faculty
Sherry.Gamble@asu.edu
Karina Richardson, Program Advisor
Karina.Richardson@asu.edu
602-496-2152

MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROGRAM
Arizona State University
Mission Statement
The Arizona State University Medical Laboratory Sciences Program endeavors to provide the highest quality academic and clinical education to develop competent and effective professionals, critical thinkers, leaders and lifelong learners. Students will develop an understanding of their vital responsibility to the patient and the critical role they provide in the delivery of clinical laboratory services to physicians and other health care practitioners. This role is to be accomplished utilizing teamwork and principles of continuous quality improvement.
Program Goals
The Medical Laboratory Sciences Program endeavors to establish and maintain an educational program that dedicates its efforts towards developing Medical Laboratory Scientists who are:
1.

Technically competent individuals possessing a theoretical understanding of technical procedures essential for exacting performance in the field of clinical laboratory sciences.

2.

Individuals who are capable of adjusting and adapting their technical knowledge in order to perform in all types of laboratories, i.e., size and complexity.

3.

Individuals with an awareness of the grave responsibility to the patient which is entrusted to them as they assume the role of a clinical laboratory scientist.

4.

Individuals dedicated to maintaining high ideals and standards in the practice of clinical laboratory sciences, and thereby becoming responsible professionals as individuals and members of the health care team.

5.

Individuals possessing the ability to problem solve, analyze, synthesize and evaluate.

6.

Mature, well-adjusted individuals possessing the knowledge of interpersonal skills, assuming responsibility for their own actions and capable of supervising others.

7.

Individuals who recognize their responsibility and contribution in the participation and success of Medical Laboratory Sciences educational programs.

8.

Individuals who have developed personal desire for further study and continuing education. 9.

Individuals who realize and accept their responsibilities as contributing and participating members of their professional associations.

The philosophy of the program transcends beyond the educational program to the extent that it also serves as a means to maintain a high level of proficiency, to promote competence in performance, and to stimulate intellectual growth among the Medical Laboratory Scientists in the affiliated clinical laboratories. Thus, the program enhances a work atmosphere that already accords the utmost priority to quality patient care.

MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROGRAM
Arizona State University
Description of Graduates' Career Entry-Level Competencies
In maintaining an educational program which promotes competence in performance and stimulates continued intellectual growth, the graduates of Arizona State University's Medical
Laboratory Sciences Program, upon career-entry, demonstrate the following competencies:
1. Perform analyses which require a complex network of steps and variables.
2. Recognize a problem, identify the cause (technical, instrumental or physiological), synthesize alternatives and determine solutions where no criteria are available.
3. Confirm results by having an in-depth knowledge of techniques, principles and instruments and recognize the interdependency of tests by having the knowledge of physiological conditions affecting the results.
4. Establish and monitor quality control programs.
5. Supervise others by having the knowledge of basic management skills, particularly in the area of communications and human relations.
6. Instruct others by having the knowledge of basic instructional skills.
7. Exhibit professionalism by accepting responsibility for the quality of their own work and by demonstrating a readiness for Continuing Education and development in the profession.
This program allows for individualization, specialization, and flexibility which provides opportunity for the student to become a generalist or specialist in clinical laboratory sciences.
In addition to the above, the graduates of Arizona State University's Program are capable, with appropriate experience, of demonstrating the following competencies:
1. Trouble-shoot difficult problems with the knowledge of clinical correlation of test results in the entire Clinical Laboratory Sciences.
2. Analyze patient data from available sources by having an in-depth knowledge of pathophysiology of disease as it relates to test results.
3. Monitor methodologies utilized. Design, evaluate and implement new procedures.
4. Direct laboratory department operations.
5. Direct teaching-learning experiences through informal and formal programs.

Medical Laboratory Sciences Program
Arizona State University
Essential Functions
Medical Laboratory Scientists perform various procedures that directly impact patient care. It is important that every applicant meet certain Essential Functions (or Requirements). The following Essential Functions (or Requirements) must be met, with or without reasonable accommodation, in order to participate in and graduate from the ASU Medical Laboratory
Sciences Program.
I. Physical Requirements – The student must be able to:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.

move freely and safely around the laboratory and healthcare facility. operate delicate instruments or equipment and perform meticulous procedures; use an electronic keyboard to operate laboratory instruments. use a binocular microscope. reach laboratory benchtops and carry objects within safety limits. demonstrate good normal or corrected vision. demonstrate good eye-hand physical coordination (fine-motor skills). work safely with blood and other body fluids, infectious organisms, and chemical reagents. I. Behavioral and Professional Requirements – The student must be able to:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.

work quickly and accurately under stress. organize work and direct others; exercise independent judgement; assume responsibility for own work and offer to assist in the work of others. use interpersonal skills such as communication (in verbal and written English), cooperation, confidentiality, and attentiveness in a positive and tactful manner. maintain professional relationships with colleagues, patients, physicians, and others in the healthcare setting. project a neat, well-groomed professional appearance.

I. Intellectual Requirements – The student must be able to:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.

follow written and verbal directions to perform laboratory tests and report the results. work in a thorough, careful, efficient, and organized manner, either alone or as a laboratory team member. exercise ethical judgement, integrity, honesty, dependability, and accountability in the clinical laboratory environment. practice critical thinking utilizing common sense and logic, critical evaluation, objectivity, problem solving, and decision making skills. accept constructive criticism and look for ways to improve. be flexible and creative and adapt to professional and technical changes.

The Scope of Practice of the
Medical Laboratory Sciences*
Medical Laboratory Scientists as members of the health care team are responsible for:


Assuring reliable test results which contribute to the prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of physiological and pathological conditions. This includes:
·
·
·
·

Producing accurate test results;
Assessing and improving existing laboratory methodologies;
Designing, evaluating and implementing new methodologies;
Integrating, correlating and interpreting test data.



Designing and implementing cost-effective administrative and quality control procedures for laboratories, services and personnel.



Designing, implementing and evaluating processes for education and continued education of laboratory personnel.



Developing and monitoring a Quality Assurance System to include:
·
·



Quality Control of Services
Competence Assurance of Personnel

Promoting an awareness and understanding of the profession to laboratory personnel, related professions and to the consumer/public.

*American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science

MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROGRAM
Arizona State University
STANDARDS FOR THE MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROGRAM
I.

Grades
A. Grade Scale
Grades given in the Professional Study Program (Medical Laboratory Sciences
Lecture/Laboratory and Clinical Laboratory Applications) are based on the following scale: Percentage Grade

Letter Grade

100-90
89-80%
79-70
Below 70%

A
B
C
Fail

B. Grade Determination
Grades are determined by assessing the achievement of the minimum standards for each Course/Unit of Instruction.
1.

Lecture/Laboratory* Courses (on-campus coursework)
Grades are calculated as follows:
60% of the grade based on the lecture (didactic) grade
40% of the grade based on the laboratory (technical) grade

2.

Clinical Laboratory Applications* Courses (off-campus coursework)
Grades will be based on exam scores and/or contract completion.

*See attached Course/Unit of Instruction List (Attachment #1, page 13)

II.

Minimum Standards for Medical Sciences Lecture/Laboratory (On-campus Coursework)
The student must achieve the specific minimum requirements as stated in the Medical
Sciences Lecture/Laboratory "Grade Requirement Document" for each Unit of Instruction within a Course. In general, for all Courses, the minimum requirements are:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

III.

An overall exam average of 70%.
A final exam grade of 70%.
A final laboratory practical grade of 70%.
An overall lab grade of 80%.
Satisfactory completion of the technical requirements as described in the objectives.
A satisfactory evaluation of performance to include professional conduct, technical performance, and academic performance. (Refer to Attachment #2, page 14 and accompanying objectives, page 16.)

Minimum Standards for Medical Laboratory Applications (Off-campus Coursework)
The student must achieve the specific minimum requirements as stated in the Clinical
Laboratory Applications "Grade Requirement Document" for each Unit of Instruction within a Course. In general, for all Courses, the minimum requirements are:
1.
2.
3.

Satisfactory completion of performance objectives.
A 70% on the final exam(s).
A satisfactory evaluation of performance. (Refer to Attachment #3, page 19 and accompanying objectives, page 22.)

IV. Continuance in the Program
Students must meet the minimum requirements for each Unit of Instruction/Course to continue in the Professional Study Program. Students who fail to meet the requirements are placed on a deficiency status which remains in effect for the duration of the Program.
A. Standards Committee
The Standards Committee will be composed of the A.S.U. Medical Laboratory
Sciences Program Faculty and the Educational Coordinator from the Clinical Affiliate when appropriate.
The Standards Committee continuously monitors student performance throughout each Course and students are notified by the appropriate instructor when improvement is necessary.
At the end of each Unit of Instruction/Course, the Standards Committee will meet to determine each student's status in the Program as evaluated against the minimum standards. When standards are not met the committee will determine the continuance or discontinuance of the student in the Program.
B. Deficiency Status
Failure to achieve any one of the minimum standards for any Unit of
Instruction/Course constitutes a deficiency and a report which places the student on a
Deficiency Status is issued to the student. The University Faculty and the Clinical

Instructor(s), where appropriate, will determine a course of action for the student to make up the deficiency. In the case that the Standards Committee determines a student may not continue in the program, a course of action will not be developed. The student will be required to complete this course of action by a specified date. The deficiency, course of action, and date of completion will be documented in writing and signed by the student and appropriate faculty/instructor(s). The student will receive a copy of this document.
When the course of action for the deficiency is completed, the grade for the course will be awarded. (Note: If the course of action involves a make-up exam, the grade will be the average of the original grade and make up grade. The averaged grade will be the grade compared to the minimum standards to determine achievement of the standard.
If the deficiency is due to an unsatisfactory performance evaluation, the grade may not be awarded until the student satisfactorily completes the Professional Study Program.)
Failure to make up the deficiency as defined in the course of action or failure to complete the course of action by the date specified will automatically prevent the student from continuing in the Professional Study Program.
A second deficiency at any time during the Professional Study Program, even though the course of action for the first deficiency has been satisfactorily completed, constitutes adequate grounds for preventing the student from continuing in the
Professional Study Program. When a second deficiency is issued, the Standards
Committee will meet to determine whether the student will be allowed to continue in the Program. The decision of the Standards Committee is final.
Dismissal from the Medical Laboratory Sciences Program prevents the student from continuing in other concurrent Medical Laboratory Sciences courses and future scheduled courses.
C. Appeals
Appeals for reconsideration of a Standards Committee decision can be made by the student to the Program Director and the School of Life Sciences Director. Appeals must be made within one month of initial student notification.
For further information regarding Appeals, refer to “Instructor-Initiated Withdrawal” policy and "University Policy for Student Appeal Procedure on Grades" in the ASU
Catalog.

Attachment #1
MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES
Arizona State University
Course/Unit of Instruction List
CLINICAL SCIENCES LECTURE/LABORATORY
(on-campus coursework)

MDL 410 Laboratory Leadership and Management
MDL 420 Advanced Clinical Urinalysis and Body Fluids
MDL 430 Advanced Clinical Hematology and Hemostasis
MDL 440 Advanced Clinical Immunology and Immunohematology
MDL 450 Advanced Clinical Microbiology
MDL 460 Advanced Clinical Chemistry

CLINICAL LABORATORY APPLICATIONS
(off-campus coursework)

MDL 421 Advanced Practicum: Clinical Urinalysis and Body Fluids
MDL 431 Advanced Practicum: Clinical Hematology and Hemostasis
MDL 441 Advanced Practicum: Clinical Immunohematology and Immunology
MDL 451 Advanced Practicum: Clinical Microbiology
MDL 461 Advanced Practicum: Clinical Chemistry

Attachment #2
MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROGRAM
Arizona State University
(On-Campus) Course Objectives Evaluation Form
STUDENT
DATES: From
EVALUATED BY:

COURSE
To
DATE

SATISFACTORY

UNSATISFACTORY

KEY:
1. Excellent
2. Good

3.
4.

Needs Improvement 5.
Unacceptable
6.

No opportunity to observe
Limited opportunity to observe

I.

PROFESSIONAL CONDUCT: The demonstration of a professional attitude.

II.

TECHNICAL PERFORMANCE: Evaluation of the student's technical abilities.

A.

Accuracy: Ability to be correct and precise.

B.

Calculations:

C.

Work Habits: The ability to organize, concentrate on, and complete work in an acceptable manner. Demonstration of initiative.

D.

Judgement: The ability to grasp essentials and take proper actions, based on the available facts, with confidence.

III.

ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE: application to laboratory work.

IV.

COMMENTS: (Comments must be initialed)
a.

The understanding of requisite knowledge and its

Instructor:

Student initials
b.

Student:

Instructor initials

Attachment #3
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY
MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROGRAM
STUDENT EVALUATION FORM
(Off Campus Courses)
NAME:

DATE:

EVALUATED BY:

DEPT:

DAYS ABSENT FROM DEPT:
This evaluation form identifies various characteristics displayed by individuals in the clinical laboratory.
Using a Likert scale, these characteristics are further defined by behaviors which are measured from unacceptable (1) to outstanding (5). These behaviors are observable and correction of deficiencies is ultimately desired.
Upon completion of the Clinical Department Rotation, the student will receive an acceptable overall evaluation based on the following characteristics.
Please circle one number under each characteristic below. If not applicable, mark N/A.
1. ATTENTION TO RULES AND REGULATIONS:
1
2
3
Abuses rules
Occasionally needs to be reminded
Comments:

4

5
Follows rules without being reminded

3
Seldom late

4

5
Always on time

2

3
Willingly performs additional assignments when asked

4

5
Looks for things to do.
Does extra reading. Tries to find solutions to problems.

2

3
Communicates
adequately

4

5
Excellent verbal communication 2. PROMPTNESS:
1
Habitually late
Comments:

3. INITIATIVE:
1
Will not do anything except what is assigned
Comments:

4. COMMUNICATION:
1
Inadequate communication skills
Comments:

2

5. RESPONSIBILITY:
1
2
Does not accept responsibility responsibility toward for work

3
Demonstrates
work

4

5
Accepts full responsibility for all aspects of work.
Completes assigned tasks without further reminders.

Comments:

6. CONFIDENCE:
1
Level of confidence impedes performance
Comments:

2

3
Average
confidence

7. RELATIONSHIPS WITH TECHNOLOGISTS:
1
2
3
Has difficulty
Is able to establish working with an acceptable working others relationship
Comments:

4

4

5
Shows good judgment.
Mature, self-reliant.

5
Establishes excellent rapport with technologists 8. RESPONSE TO INSTRUCTION:
1
2
Resents direction; critical, argumentative
Comments:

3
Accepts
instruction

4

9. WORK AREA AND RECORDS:
1
2
Disorderly and cluttered work area.
Illegible records.
Comments:

3
Minimal clutter in work area.
Legible records.

4

5
Orderly and uncluttered work area. Neat, legible and understandable records.

4

5
Works carefully and calmly in an organized manner

10. ABILITY TO WORK UNDER PRESSURE:
1
2
3
Nervous and excitable;
Maintains composure unable to work under pressure under pressure
Comments:

5
Pleasant, attentive, cooperative, question

11. ABILITY TO LEARN:
1
Slow to learn, retain and apply material 2

3
Learns, retains and applies material

4

5
Applies and integrates data from this and previous courses to resolve problems

Comments:

12. ABILITY TO FOLLOW WRITTEN INSTRUCTIONS:
1
2
3
Does not follow
Occasionally needs Applies written written instructions. assistance in interpreting written instructions
Comments:

13. ORGANIZATION:
1
Unable to organize work
Comments:

2

3
Adequately
organized

14. COMPLETION OF WORK IN STANDARD STUDENT TIME:
1
2
3
Works slowly
Completes work
Works quickly on time
Comments:

OVERALL EVALUATION:

Satisfactory ____

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR IMPROVEMENT:

Unsatisfactory ____

4

5 instructions well. Good attention to detail.

4

4

5
Very efficient and well organized

5

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY
MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROGRAM
Professional Characteristics Objectives
Clinical Rotation
The following objectives identify various professional characteristics displayed by individuals in the clinical laboratory. These characteristics are further defined by behaviors which are measured from unacceptable (1) to outstanding (5) in the Student Evaluation form. These behaviors are observable and correction of deficiencies is ultimately desired.
Upon completion of the Clinical Department Rotation, the student will demonstrate acceptable performance of the following objectives:
1. Attention to rules and regulations: The student will follow rules without being reminded.
2. Promptness: The student will promptly arrive in the department.
3. Initiative: The student will demonstrate initiative by looking for things to do and trying to find solutions to problems.
4. Communication: The student will demonstrate proper verbal communications.
5. Responsibility: The student will accept full responsibility for all aspects of work and complete assigned tasks without further reminders.
6.Confidence: The student will demonstrate confidence by showing good judgement, maturity, and self-reliance.
7. Relationships with technologists: The student will establish appropriate rapport with technologists. 8. Response to instruction: The student will respond positively to instruction by being pleasant, attentive, and cooperative.
9. Work area and records: The student will maintain an orderly and uncluttered work area; and keep neat, legible and understandable records.
10. Ability to work under pressure: The student will be able to work carefully and calmly in an organized manner.
11. Ability to learn: The student will demonstrate the ability to learn by applying and integrating data from this and previous courses to resolve problems.
12. Ability to follow written instructions: The student will demonstrate the ability to follow written instructions and show attention to detail.
13. Organization: The student will demonstrate proper organization by being efficient and well organized.
14. Completion of work in standard student time: The student will complete work in standard student time.

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY
MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCES PROGRAM

Policies and Standards

I,

, have read and

understand the policies and standards for progression in and completion of the program as described in the “General Student Information Manual”, and I agree to follow these policies and standards.

_
Signature

Date

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