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Shrimp Anti Dumping

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Indian Shrimp Industry vs Anti-dumping allegation

On 31st December, 2003, the Ad Hoc Shrimp Trade Action Committee (ASTAC) files an anti-dumping petition against 6 countries including India. The case was backed by the Southern Shrimp Association (SSA) of the USA citing dumping of shrimps by the listed countries in the US market paralyzing the domestic industry. Events and their impact on India and US were as follows: a) The US Department of Commerce (DOC) initiates the investigation and notifies the International Trade Commission (ITC) which approves the case and preliminary investigation and duties are performed by 28th July, 2004. b) There is a fall-out between the SSA and the American Seafood Distribution Association (ASDA) as it backs the import of shrimps from the countries to be charged. c) Vietnam, Thailand and Indonesia argue at them being wrongly accused since they export shrimps to the US at the market defined rates but India is in the docks. d) The Us position is that the 6 countries named in the case have grown their space in shrimp imports to it in the years and have captured about 74% of the import to US. e) For India shrimp is the major marine export with plenty of livelihood dependent upon it. f) MPEDA and SEAI forged alliance to not only develop the shrimp industry from scratch but also enable the value chain people with enough money from business through exports at the best possible price. g) The Indian association went against the case and vowed to pour in $40 million to pay for the case in US which was a sufficient percent of the %70 million required. h) India’s argument was that the shrimps from Indonesia or any other listed country were not tiger shrimps which India exported. This type of shrimp was not cultured or produced in USA; so, they had a direct leverage in selling this in the USA. i) The culturing…...

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