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Social Effects On America During The Great Depression

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The Great Depression started on October 24, 1929,“Black Thursday”, and lasted until 1939. The Great Depression affected many aspects of people's lives. These aspects included the social, economic, and political effects on American society during the Great Depression.
The Great Depression transformed the American view on the social, economic, and political side of things. All the aspects of life that were effect connected some way or another. The Social effects on American society during the Great Depression varied. Some the social effects included dept, suicide, unemployment, separation of social classes, wage cuts, poverty, discrimination in many ways, and evictions that led to overcrowding and people being homeless. The economic effects...

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