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Social Factors vs. Sex Roles

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Submitted By Adel
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Social Factors vs. Sex Roles
Men should behave like men and women should behave like women. All over the world, a born child could be a boy or a girl, which means different genders. Therefore, both genders should have different sex roles and behaviors. What makes both genders behave differently is an argumentative subject. Some people say biological factors and others say social factors. However, they could be the social factors such as socialization, treatment, and role models. The first social factor that determines sex roles is the socialization. Boys and girls can be socialized to behave differently. According to the article titled Sex Roles, “most differences between females and males are learned through family interactions, socialization in schools, and the mass media. Thus, sex roles could be socialized. The second social factor that determines sex roles is the treatment. Boys and girls get different treatment; girls get more sensitive and emotional treatment. An example from the article titled Sex Roles is that adults describe girls as delicate, sweet, or dainty; however, they describe boys as bouncing, sturdy, or handsome. So, the treatment is important for determining sex roles. The last social factor that determines sex roles is the role models. Role models affect children’s thinking and behaviors. Sex roles article has reported that children can be influenced of determining which jobs are for them and which are not by watching the role models available in a society. Therefore, role models is an important factor affecting sex roles. To conclude, the factors of socialization, treatment, and the role models are considered as social factors that specify different sex roles and different behaviors for genders, girls and boys. Even though sex roles for both genders are different, it does not mean the sex roles for one gender is butter or worse than...

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