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Sociological Perspective

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Sociological Perspective Paper: Conflict Perspective
Team "B'
SOC/101- Introduction to Sociology
October 13, 2014
Angela Rudibaugh

Sociological Perspective Paper: Conflict Perspective

Recently I viewed a video named Three Cups of Tea. The video highlighted the works of Nobel Peace Prize nominee Greg Morrison’s work through bringing educational institution to girls across the world. The video has brought up points pertaining to conflict perspective theory of sociology covering two classes looking out for their own interest. The struggle between the two groups clearly shows a dominant and a submissive side. In the video men are portrayed as the dominant group, while women are the submissive group. This is made valid by Morrison’s comments throughout the video.

The video Three cups of Tea is of a short interview of a man named Greg Morrison and his young daughter that discusses his humanitarian work. Morrison has built 78 schools for young girls in third world countries such as Afghanistan and Pakistan. Three cups of Tea is a book that is dedicated to helping spread his message; books not bombs. Morrison aims to educate young girls with the hope that they will grow up to make education a priority for their own children (NBC News Archives, 2010).
The conflict perspective theory of sociology was developed by Karl Marx. In this theory “social injustice and uneven destitution of wealth give rise to criminological conditions.” (Conflict Perspective, 2011, para. 1). This theory is based on research about society being divided between two classes of people with one class having power over the other. The two classes clash in pursuit of their own interests. The systems of society such as economic, social, and political groups must work together in order for one group to maintain power over the other group.
Specific components of inequality in the conflict perspective that are exemplified in this evaluation are illustrated in the description of how the children were using dirt and sticks to do their lessons for school. This is a clear example of how the rich are benefiting and the poor are left behind. Furthermore, there is a clear indication of inequality and the struggle between the two groups. The conflict perspective can be applied because in other societies it is not just young females who are in need of schooling or all children receive schooling equally; clearly there is a dominant and a submissive group in this situation. The component of social change suggested by Greg Morrison is to distribute the resources and provide access to education in the town of Korphe and similar places around the world. The idea of setting up the schools in poorer communities can help to change the competing social systems of communities because of the recognition these people will be receiving. Many people view school as something that they have to do whereas people in struggling societies view school as a privilege. These girls can open other young girl’s eyes in the community (NBC News Archives, 2010).
One example in the video includes how Morrison talks about teaching young girls and does not say anything about teaching the young boys. The countries that these issues are prevalent in are governed mainly by the male population. If education was made more of a priority for all genders then perhaps it would help lessen poverty, violence, etc.
The struggle that these communities go through is enough to discourage anyone from wanting to go out in these rough and poor areas; for these girls it is a blessing to be able to get an education. This video recognizes the struggle these girls endure and the pursuit to help them gain an education. These girls demonstrate the fact that getting an education is a privilege and it should not be taken for granted. The conflict perspective can be applied to this situation. This is evident when considering that it seems to be women who are primarily kept from an education; men seem to be the dominant group. . Inequality is evident when considering the need for young girl’s education but not young boy’s.

References
Conflict perspective. (2011 Mar 18). Daily News Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/857442975?accountid=458
NBC News Archives (2010). Three Cups of Tea [Video file]. Retrieved from University
Of Phoenix website:
https://ecampus.phoenix.edu/secure/aapd/UOPHX/SOC100/ThreeCupsOfTea.htm

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