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Sociology and Sociological Imagination Are Both Connected to Each Other; One Cannot Stand-Alone from the Other

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Sociology and sociological imagination are both connected to each other; one cannot stand-alone from the other. Therefore, they go hand in hand. However, when looking at these two terms they are very different from each other. According to McGraw Hill sociology is, “the study of the relationship between the individual and society and of the consequences of difference.” Sociology mainly focuses on how other individuals affect us and even how we affect other individuals. For example, our parents and others close to us shape the way we think in one way or another. Not only our parents are part of who we are but also the world around us. Therefore, sociology specifically focuses on the influences that shape us as an individual. On the other hand, McGraw Hill stated that sociological imagination was, “an awareness of the relationship between who we are as individuals and the social forces that shape our lives.” Sociological imagination focuses more on the understanding of an individual. It is also considered a tool used in sociology. This tool allows us to see people in depth and have a better understanding of who they are. Therefore, sociology is broader in the way that it focuses on the influences; while social imagination is more focused on the individuals way of being due to the influences that surround him/her. Sociological imagination is of great importance in order for us to understand our society and individuals because as the books stated we can be the spectators and examine them. By doing this we can further understand why they have certain preferences in different areas. Also sociological imagination helps us see what shapes persons actions and the role they play in our society. Our society is diverse in different areas. Once we use sociological imagination we can see the factors that shape different groups in our society and better…...

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