Sociology Essay Exam

In: Social Issues

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Sociology Exam #2

Short Answer:
1. Explain the concepts of status set and role set. Provide examples of each concept.
Every person has developed a specific status for themselves, whether it is a voluntary or they have no choice. A status is a person’s position in society, and the statuses are either pursued or involuntarily received. Role sets are behaviors that are specifically attached to a status, each status can have a number of role sets. People have multiple status sets and many more role sets, because each earned status has its specific responsibilities. For instance, an American woman has the potential to be several things in a modern American family. She has the likelihood of being a mother which would be an achieved status because she has the choice of becoming a parent. Several roles would be attached to this status such as, providing for the children, being active in the child’s extracurricular activities and much more.

2. What makes something funny? Explain the foundation of humor and what is involved in “getting” a joke.
Playing with reality is our cultures form of humor for now, and it is a reasonable way to discuss topics that are typically avoided in today’s mainstream culture. With today’s outlook on race and sexuality, put down jokes is what is found humorous to the generations now. Overall, humor is derived from violations of the culture’s norms. The foundation of humor is from mixing realities which promote humor. Since humor involves both the unconventional and conventional realities, it is necessary to understand both the realities along with their differences. Getting the joke relies on the person receiving the punch line to understand all the background information and fill in what is missing.

3. What are the differences between categories of people and social groups?
Categories of people and social groups…...

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