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Soil Conversion

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Soil Conservation
Working Group Report

This report provided content for the
Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts first report,
Wisconsin’s Changing Climate: Impacts and Adaptation, released in February 2011.

THE WISCONSIN INITIATIVE ON
CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS
1st Adaptive Assessment Report
Contribution of the Soil Conservation Working Group
July 2010

Contour stripcropping in central Wisconsin
Photo by Ron Nichols, USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service

Participants of Working Group
William L. Bland, Professor, Department of Soil Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison
(Working Group Chair and lead author)
Kelly R. Maynard, M.S. Agroecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison (Project Assistant)
Jeremy Balousek, P.E., Urban Conservation Engineer, Dane County Land and Water
Resources Department
Denny Caneff, Executive Director, River Alliance of Wisconsin, Inc.
Laura W. Good, Associate Scientist, Department of Soil Science, University of
Wisconson-Madison
Kevin Kirsch, Water Resource Engineer, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
Patrick Murphy, State Resource Conservationist, Natural Resources Conservation Service
John M. Norman, Emeritus Professor of Soil science, Department of Soil Science,
University of Wisconsin-Madison
James VandenBrook, Water Quality Section Chief, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture,
Trade, and Consumer Protection
Sara Walling, Water Quality Specialist, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and
Consumer Protection
Dreux Watermolen, Section Chief, Science Information Services, Wisconsin Department of
Natural Resources
Richard P. Wolkowski, Extension Soil Scientist, Department of Soil Science, University of
Wisconsin-Madison

SOIL CONSERVATION WORKING GROUP
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Conservation of the soil resource in Wisconsin is not a new challenge but one that will become more...

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