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Special Education and the Principles of Nclb

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Special Education and the Principles of NCLB
Rebecca Foster
AED/222
October 30, 2011
Paula Alysha Glover Special Education and the Principles of NCLB
The No Child Left behind Act, (NCLB 2001), was designed to raise the standard for education in the United States. This act has five core principles that have been the foundation of the NCLB act which have each had pros and cons.
States are responsible for being accountable for goal setting as well as for showing improvement of test results. The pros of this principle are that states have the authority to set their own goals, which is good because states have a better understanding of their population and their social economic factors that may affect test scores. The cons of states being responsible for their standards is that they have the ability to set their goals low to make it appear as though they are achieving better scores. Another problem with this is due to the varying local social and economic differences test scores may not be reflected fairly. Teachers are pressured to teach their students how to do well on the standardized testing instead of teaching for students to learn. The testing is also unfair because of the students with disabilities, students are discriminated upon because the state is able to make one percent of their students exempt to make up for these types of students.
The NCLB act allows states and local officials to have greater flexibility when allocating where funds should go within the school districts. This principle is only positive because schools that are shown to have lower test scores as well as not meeting the state standards can have more funds without having to go through the federal government. This does not take into account the needs of diverse learners within the schools.
The No Child Left Behind act greatly emphasizes proven teaching methods that have been...

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