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Startups You Need to Know

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M U M BA I

S I L I C O N VA L L E Y

BA N G A LO RE

S I N G A P O RE

M U M BA I B KC

NEW DELHI

MUNICH

N E W YO RK

Start – Ups: What
You Need To Know

April 2016

© Copyright 2016 Nishith Desai Associates

www.nishithdesai.com

Provided upon request only

© Nishith Desai Associates 2016

Start – Ups: What You Need To Know

About NDA
Nishith Desai Associates (NDA) is a research based international law firm with offices in Mumbai, Bangalore, Silicon
Valley, Singapore, New Delhi, Munich & New York. We specialize in strategic legal, regulatory and tax advice coupled with industry expertise in an integrated manner. We focus on niche areas in which we provide significant value and are invariably involved in select highly complex, innovative transactions. Our key clients include marquee repeat
Fortune 500 clientele.
Our practice areas include Mergers & Acquisitions, Private Equity Investments, Corporate & Securities Law, Competition Law, JVs & Restructuring, International Tax, International Tax Litigation, Litigation & Dispute Resolution, Fund
Formation, Capital Markets, Employment and HR, Intellectual Property, International Commercial Law and Private
Client. Our specialized industry niches include funds, financial services, insurance, IT and telecom, pharma and healthcare, media and entertainment, real estate and infrastructure & education.
Nishith Desai Associates has been ranked as the Most Innovative Indian Law Firm (2014 & 2015) at the Innovative Lawyers Asia-Pacific Awards by the Financial Times - RSG Consulting. Nishith Desai Associates has been awarded for “M&A
Deal of the year”, “Best Dispute Management lawyer”, “Best Use of Innovation and Technology in a law firm” and “Best
Dispute Management Firm”, by IDEX Legal 2015 in association with three legal charities; IDIA, iProbono and Thomson
Reuters Foundation....

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