Stroop

In: Business and Management

Submitted By joanamarie
Words 2139
Pages 9
Abstract:
The stroop effect can be reduced through stroop dilution and this is achieved through the use of neutral words. This paper focuses on a study undertaken on a sample where n = 30 and the participants were exposed to three tests, one test included testing time taken to read colour words which had the same colour as the word stated, the second test was to record the time taken to read words colour words that had different colours as the colour word stated and the third and final test was to test the time taken for the individual to read neutral words containing different colours.
The study was undertaken to determine whether there was a reduction in the stroop effect which was to be based on the time taken to accomplish the three tasks, it was found out that indeed the stroop effect reduced ands this was noted due to the reduction in the time taken in reading the third task.

Introduction:
The stroop effect is viewed as the interference when undertaking a task; this effect was first coined by Ridley Stroop in 1935. his findings were that there was usually a delay when naming a colour name which is written in a different colour, example writing the word RED in colour red would result into much easier to read than if RED is written in blue, this is due to the stroop effect. Some theorists have come up with explanation of this effect and this includes the speed to process theory and the selective attention theory.
According to the speed of process theory the stroop effect is viewed as an interference which occurs because the words are read faster than colour naming, this theory states that words are easily read than the colours and for this reason the effect occurs. The selective attention theory on the hand states that the stroop effect occurs because colour naming requires more attention than when a person is reading the word, therefore because of the ease…...

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