Studying Financial Inclusion in North-East India

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Title: Studying financial inclusion in north-east India
Author(s): Disha Bhanot, (Shailesh J. Mehta School of Management (SJMSOM), IIT Bombay, Mumbai, India), Varadraj Bapat, (Shailesh J. Mehta School of Management (SJMSOM), IIT Bombay, Mumbai, India), Sasadhar Bera, (Shailesh J. Mehta School of Management (SJMSOM), IIT Bombay, Mumbai, India)
Citation: Disha Bhanot, Varadraj Bapat, Sasadhar Bera, (2012) "Studying financial inclusion in north-east India", International Journal of Bank Marketing, Vol. 30 Iss: 6, pp.465 - 484
Keywords: Banking, Banks, Empirical study, Finance, India, Marketing strategy, Rural areas, Social inclusion

Article type: Research paper
DOI: 10.1108/02652321211262221 (Permanent URL)

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Acknowledgements: The authors are grateful to Ashish Bhave for his help in fieldwork management. Very special thanks to the authors' fellow brothers and sisters in the north-east who took time out to fill in the questionnaires. The authors also thank Professor Rajini R. Joshi (from the Department of Mathematics, IIT Bombay) for her help in enriching the interpretation of the results.
Abstract: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors which are crucial in determining the extent of financial inclusion in geographically remote areas. The study also aims to provide suggestive measures for banks to tap unexplored markets.
Design/methodology/approach – Primary data were collected via structured questionnaire from 411 households from the states of Assam and Meghalaya in north-east India. Factors significantly contributing to inclusion were identified using a logistic regression model.
Findings – Level of financial inclusion in north-east India remains very low. Income, financial information from various channels and awareness of self help groups (SHGs), and education are…...

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