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Substance Abuse

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By mattprieto
Words 1341
Pages 6
Joseph Derowski
It is not a disease. Do people just need to “man up” and deal with their responsibilities? They chose that life. Or is there much more to substance abuse than what people who haven’t experienced it firsthand know. Growing up I have experienced substance abuse in many ways, most predominantly through my dad. Alcohol was pretty much a staple in my family as I’m sure it is in many families all over the world. It wasn’t weird that whenever family was together everyone was drinking. It was just what it was and it was normal for us. I thought everyone’s dad was just like my dad, and my dad was awesome. All the time I would hear “shh don’t tell mom, just get in the car” and we would go out and have fun and everything was great, most of the time. But it came with serious problems, but only being a kid I thought screaming, yelling, and getting hit when you were out of line was just how things were. This essay is in no way meant to paint my dad in a bad light. As of right now my dad and I live together in a small apartment and I can honestly say he is my best friend, but it’s been a long battle of recovery that I possibly cannot explain in a short essay. So I will give you snapshot of what substance abuse can lead too and how it can affect a family. If you were to classify my dad or fit him into one the thousands of stereotypes out there you would have called him a functioning drunk. In a social setting he was always the happy guy who always had a little too much, but everyone liked him. He always worked and held a good blue collar job, so does that count as being responsible? I always had a bed to sleep in and something to eat. I was able to play sports and he would surprise me, my brother and sister with an occasional gift. We weren’t rich but with all the “extra-curricular” activities my dad had his hand in, which is a long story for a different time, my...

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