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Susan B Anthony Women's Rights Movement

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“Men, their rights, and nothing more; women, their rights, and nothing less”, stated Susan B. Anthony, a women’s rights activist and founder of the New York State’s Women’s Rights Committee. This claim encompasses a tumultuous time where women struggled for a voice in a country that counted them as second rate citizens. That would change, when two women devoted their lives to the fight for women’s suffrage which would begin a journey to equality that women are still embarking on today. Starting in 1848 women have been struggling for equal rights, the struggle has been a continuous issue, even up to modern day. Women were successful in creating equal rights in most aspects but, women still lack equality today. The fight for equal rights …show more content…
Many important events followed that significant day in history. In 1850 Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony made a lifetime alliance as women’s rights activists. During the 1850s, the two women attempted to gain basic rights for women and were not successful in the modification of the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments. In the year 1869, Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony created the National Women’s Suffrage Association (NWSA). Another major group was formed by Lucy Stone, a women’s suffrage activist, called the American Women’s Suffrage Association or the AWSA. The members of the AWSA denied the NWSA for being racially discordant. The focus of the AWSA was at a state level. In the 1880s the women’s rights movement was not as prominent in most areas of the United States “During the 1880s, the two wings of the women’s rights movement struggled to maintain momentum. The AWSA was better funded and the larger of the two groups, but it had only a regional reach. The NWSA, which was based in New York, relied on its statewide network but also drew recruits from around the nation, largely on the basis of the extensive speaking circuit of Stanton and Anthony. Neither group …show more content…
Many protests, battles, and effort was put into history to become the great country that the United States is today. Many women were required to step up and lead to the success we have today. Thanks to those one hundred women who attended the first women’s rights meeting, their resilience provided women with voting rights and with those rights the power for women to have a voice in our country. Although women’s suffrage does not mean that women are not completely equal to men in modern day, they have a voice and the power to continually challenge inequality in their nation.. As Susan B. Anthony once said, “Men, their rights, and nothing more; Women, their rights, and nothing less”, this is still relevant today. To attain complete equality the only worry should be women and men having the equal amount of rights and opportunities. (History, Art, and Archives U.S. House of

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