Free Essay

Syllabus

In: Other Topics

Submitted By barimano
Words 14375
Pages 58
BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Course Contents for Subjects with Code: ENG
This document only contains details of courses having code ENG.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

1

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐101 Year 1

Subject Title Introduction to Literature‐I (History of English Literature‐I) Discipline English

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester I

Aims: One of the objectives of this course is to inform the readers about the influence of historical and socio-cultural events upon the production of literature. Although the scope of the course is quite expansive, the readers shall focus on early 14th to 19th century Romantic Movement. Histories of literature written by some British literary historians will be consulted to form some socio-cultural and political cross connections. In its broader spectrum, the course covers a reference to the multiple factors from economic theories to religious, philosophical and metaphysical debates that overlap in these literary works of diverse nature and time periods under multiple contexts. The reading of literature in this way i.e. within the sociocultural context will help the readers become aware of the fact that literary works are basically a referential product of the practice that goes back to continuous interdisciplinary interaction.

Contents: • Medieval Period • Renaissance and Reformation • Elizabethan Period • Milton, the Metaphysical, and the Cavalier Poets • The Age of Reason and Neo-Classicism • Restoration Drama • Augustan Satire • The Rise of the Novel • Romanticism

Recommended Readings: 1. Long, William J.: English Literature: Its History and Significance for the life of English speaking world, enlarged edition, 2006. 2. Evans, Ifor. A Short History of English Literature. London: Penguin, 1976 3. Ford, Boris.The New Pelican Guide to English Literature. Vol. 1-9. London: Penguin, 1990. 4. Compton-Rickett, A. A History of English Literature. Thomas-Nelson & Sales, 1940 (latest edition). 5. Gillie, C. Longman. Companion to English Literature (2nd Edition). London: Longman, 1977. 6. Dachies, David. A Critical History of English Literature. Vol. 1-4. London: Secker & Warburg (latest edition), 1961.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

2

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges 7. Sanders, Andrew. The Short Oxford History of English Literature. Oxford University Press, USA.2002. Note: The recommended readings are optional and are provided to facilitate the aims and objectives of the syllabus. They are not to be taken as text books.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

3

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code Subject Title Cr. Hrs Semester ENG‐102 Introduction to Linguistics‐I 3 I Year Discipline 1 English Aims: To introduce students to the basic concepts in Linguistics and language study Contents: • Basic terms and concepts in Linguistics o What is language (e.g. design features, nature and functions of language)? o What is linguistics (e.g. diachronic/synchronic; paradigmatic/syntamatic relations)? • Elements of Language o Phonology (Sounds of English) o Morphology (Word forms & structures) o Syntax (Sentence structures) o Semantics (Meanings) Recommended Readings: 1. Aitchison, J. 2000. Linguistics (Teach Yourself Books). 2. Farmer, A. K; Demers, R. A. A Linguistics Workbook 3. Finch, G. How to Study Linguistics: A Guide to Understanding Linguistics. Palgrave 4. Fromkin, V. A; Rodman, R. and Hymas, M. 2002. Introduction to Language. 6th Ed. New York: Heinley 5. Radford, A., Atkinson, M., Briatain, D., Clahsen, H., Spencer, A. 1999. Linguistics: An Introduction. CUP. 6. Todd, L. 1987. An Introduction to Linguistics. Moonbeam Publications 7. Yule, G. 2006. The Study of Language. Second edition. C UP. Note: The concepts listed in the syllabus contents may be acquired from sources other than those recommended.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

4

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐103 Year 1

Subject Title Introduction to Literature‐II (Poetry and One Act Plays) Discipline English

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester II

Aims: This course introduces various forms and styles of the genre of poetry in English or translated. Irrespective of any chronological or historical development or the hierarchy of major and minor or continental and local or classical and popular, the main purpose of these readings is to highlight the variety of poetry worldwide and its possible inter-connection. The readers will find here a combination of elegy, ode, lyric, ballad, free verse, and many other types. In a way the variety of the poetic expression informs about the sub-generic elements of verse. There is lot of scope for further analysis and research into the secrets of versification: tone and mood, metre, rhythm, rhyme, and such technical details, but, above all the function is to aesthetically enrich the readers with various mechanisms of musicality through words placed in poetic order. For some background help, the teachers may introduce a diversity of poetic expression and also consult any reference book detailing the fundamentals of poetry. As far as the aim of introducing one act and other plays is concerned, it is to familiarize the readers with fundamentals of drama i.e. character, plot, setting, dialogue. It would prepare them for a mature understanding of drama as a popular genre in literature. 1. Poetry Sonnet • Milton: • Robert Frost: Song • Christina Rossetti: • John Donne: Dramatic Monologue • Robert Browning: • Alfred Tennyson: Elegy • Thomas Gray: • Dylan Thomas: • Elizabeth Jennings Ballad • John Keats: • W. H. Auden: Ode • Percy B. Shelley: • John Keats: • Fleur Adcock:

On His Blindness The Silken Tent When I am Dead my Dearest Go and Catch a Falling Star

My Last Duchess Ulysses Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard A Refusal to Mourn the Death, by Fire, of a Child in London For a Child Born Dead La Belle Dame Sans Merci O What Is That Sound Ode to the West Wind Ode to Autumn For Heidi with Blue Hair

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

5

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges Free Verse • William Carlos Williams: Red Wheel Barrow Epic • Lines from John Milton’s Paradise Lost (Lines 1-125) • Lines from Alexander Pope’s Rape of the Lock (Canto-I) Recommended Readings: 1. Abbs, P. & Richardson, J. The Forms of Poetry. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1995. 2. Barnet, Sylvan. A Short Guide to Writing About Literature (7th Edition). New York: Harper and Collins, 1996. 3. Boulton, Marjorie. The Anatomy of Poetry. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1977. 4. Kennedy, X. J. Gioia, D. An Introduction to Poetry: (8th Edition). New York: Harper Collins College Publishers, 1994.

2. Drama Lady Gregory: Edward Albee: The Rising of the Moon The Sandbox

Recommended Readings: 1. Hill,Mc Graw. An Introduction to Modern One-Act Plays. Glencoe/McGraw-Hill. 1991. 2. Litz, A. Walton, Menand, Louis and Rainey, Lawrence. The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism, Vol. 7: Modernism and the New Criticism. Cambridge University Press. 2006. 3. Chakraborty, Bhaktibenode. Anton Chekov, The Crusader For A Better World. K.P. Bagchi & Co .1990. 4. Kopper Edward A. Lady Gregory: A Review Of The Criticism (Modern Irish Literature Monograph Series). E.A. Kopper, Jr. 1991. 5. Schrank, Bernice and Demastes, William W. Irish Playwrights, 1880-1995: A Research and Production Sourcebook . Greenwood Press. 1997. 6. Zinman, Toby. Edward Albee (Michigan Modern Dramatists). University of Michigan Press. University of South Carolina Press 2008. 7. Roudane, Matthew C. Understanding Edward Albee (Understanding Contemporary American Literature).1987. 8. Bottoms, Stephen. The Cambridge Companion to Edward Albee. (Cambridge Companions to Literature). CUP, 2005. 9. Manheim, Michael. The Cambridge Companion to Eugene O'Neill (Cambridge Companions to Literature).CUP, 1998.

Note: The recommended readings are optional and are provided to facilitate the aims and objectives of the syllabus. They are not to be taken as text books.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

6

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code Subject Title ENG‐104 Introduction to Linguistics‐II Year Discipline 1 English Aims: To introduce the students to: • major schools and movements in Linguistics • Use of language in communication

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester II

Contents: • Scope of Linguistics: An Introduction to Major Branches of Linguistics • Schools of Linguistics (Generativism, Structuralism, Functionalism) • Discourse Analysis (Difference between Spoken and Written discourse, conversational structure, coherence/cohesion) • Stylistic variation Recommended Books 1. Akmajian, A: Demers, R. A: Farmer, A. K. and Harnish, R. M. 2001. An Introduction to Language and Communication. 4th Ed. Massachusetts: MIT 2. Coulthard, Malcolm. 1985. An Introduction to Discourse Analysis. New Ed. London: Longman 3. Crystal, D. 1997. The Encyclopedia of Language. Cambridge: CUP 4. Fromkin, V. A: Rodman, R. and Hymas, M. 2002. Introduction to Language. 6th Ed. New York: Heinley 5. Chapman, Siobhan, Christopher Routledge, ed. Key Ideas in Linguistics and Philosophy of Language. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2009. 6. Leech, Geoffery, Margaret Deuchar, and Robert Hoogenraad. English Grammar for Today. A New Introduction. New York: Palgrave. 2006. Chapters 1, 8 and 10. Pp. 610,133-170. 7. Leech, N. Geoffery. A Linguistic Guid to English Podetry. Hong Kong. Longman.1987. pp 42-52. 8. Lyons, John. Language And Linguistic: an Introduction. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press 1981. Chapter 7. Pp216-237. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 2009. 9. Radford, Andrew, Martin Atkinson, David Britain, Herald Clashen, Andrew spenser. Linguistics: an Introduction. Melbourne: Cambridge University Press. 1999. Chapters 4, 16 and 22: pp. 66-83,245-273 and.338-356. Note: The concepts listed in the syllabus contents may be acquired from sources other than those recommended.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

7

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Subject Title Cr. Hrs Semester English‐I (Language in Use) 3 I Discipline Botany, Zoology, Mathematics‐I,II, Statistics‐I,II,III, Chemistry‐I,II, Applied Psychology, Business Administration, Commerce, Economics, English, Sociology & Sociocultural Studies, Social 1 Work, Political Science, Physics, Mass Communication, Islamic Education, History, Education (Elementary), Education (Secondary), Urdu 1) BASICS OF GRAMMAR I Recommended Books: Oxford Practice Grammar by John Eastwood Oxford University Press. Published 2005. • Unit No. 76, 77,78,79,80,81,82,83,84,85,86,87,88,89,90. (ARTICLES) • Unit No. 98, 99, 100, 101, 102 103. (PRONOUNS) • Unit No. 104, 105, 106, 107, 110, 111, 112. (ADJECTIVES AND ADVERBS) • Unit No. 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127. (PREPOSITIONS) • Unit No. 150, 151, 152, 153. (LINKING WORDS) • Appendix 3 Page No. 372 2) READING COMPREHENSION AND SUMMARIZING SKILLS Recommended Books: Focus on Comprehension Book 4 by Peter Ellison Learners Publishing Pte. Ltd. Singapore, 2009. • Section 1. Unit No. 1. • Section 2. Unit No. 2, 3, 4, 5. Practice Unit 1. • Section 3. Unit No. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. Practice Unit 2. 3) PARAGRAPH WRITING I The students are required to know basics of Paragraph Writing with an emphasis on Topic sentences and Supporting sentences and a possible Concluding sentence. (Word Limit Up to 120 words) Recommended Books: Paragraph Development: A Guide for Students of English as a Second Language by Martin L. Arnaudet, Mary Ellen Barrett. Pub. Prentice Hall College Div. 1981 (Page 132) 4) LISTENING AND SPEAKING SKILLS This unit will lead up to the teaching and evaluation of “Oral Presentation Skills” in the following semesters also. Recommended Books: Oxford Practice Grammar by John Eastwood Oxford University Press. Published 2005. • Unit No. 34, 35, 36, 38, 39. 5) VOCABULARY BUILDING SKILLS GAT HIGH FREQUENCY WORDS (GAT Word List) Page No. 143-152 Recommended Books: Guide for GAT General Test. SMART BRAIN. GRE (General, Local) by Muhammad Idrees. Pub: Dogar Brothers. 2010-2011 edition. Note: The concepts listed in the syllabus contents may be acquired from sources other than those recommended.
Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab 8

Code ENG‐111 Year

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges Subject Title Cr. Hrs Semester English‐II (Academic Reading and 3 II ENG‐112 Writing) Year Discipline Botany, Zoology, Mathematics‐I,II, Statistics‐I,II,III, Chemistry‐I,II, Applied Psychology, Business Administration, Commerce, Economics, English, Sociology & Sociocultural Studies, Social 1 Work, Political Science, Physics, Mass Communication, Islamic Education, History, Education (Elementary), Education (Secondary), Urdu BASICS OF GRAMMAR II Recommended Books: Oxford Practice Grammar by John Eastwood Oxford University Press. Published 2005. • Unit No. 4, 5, 8, 9, 11, 12, 13, 16, 18, 20, 22, 23, 24, 26, 28, 29, 30 (Tenses) • Unit No. 128, 129, 130, 131 (Phrasal Verbs) READING AND CRITICAL THINKING Recommended Books: Focus on Comprehension Book 4 by Peter Ellison Learners Publishing Pte. Ltd. Singapore, 2009. • Section 4. Unit No. 12, 13, 14, 15. Practice Unit 3. • Section 5. Unit No. 16, 17, 18. • Section 6. Unit No. 19. Practice Unit 4. PARAGRAPH WRITING II The students are required to know basics of Paragraph Writing with an emphasis on Topic sentences and Supporting sentences and a possible Concluding sentences. (Word Limit Up to 120 words) Recommended Books: Paragraph Development: A Guide for Students of English as a Second Language by Martin L. Arnaudet, Mary Ellen Barrett. Pub. Prentice Hall College Div. 1981 (Page 179-185) STUDY SKILLS • The students are expected to be proficient in Reading Skills like Skimming, Scanning, Speed Reading and avoiding Faulty Reading Habits. Recommended Books: English Language Communication Skills for B.Ed by Nadeem Aziz. Pub: Majeed Book Depot. (Page 139-159) VOCABULARY BUILDING SKILLS WORD ROOT METHOD Unit 1-6. Page No. 88-103. Recommended Books: Guide for GAT General Test. SMART BRAIN. GRE (General, Local) by Muhammad Idrees. Pub: Dogar Brothers. 2010-2011 edition. Code

1)

2)

3)

4)

5)

Note: The concepts listed in the syllabus contents may be acquired from sources other than those recommended.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

9

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐121 Year 1

Subject Title Writing Workshop (IT) Discipline Information Technology

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester I

The basic philosophy behind writing workshop is to allow students to daily spend time writing for real purposes about things that interest them. Students can experiment with a variety of genres. English, spelling, handwriting and other mechanics can be taught within writing workshop. Students learn the craft of writing through practice, conferring, and studying the craft of creative and fundamental writings. Topics: Introduction of communication; 4 skills of communication; Importance and Benefits of Effective communication; Components of communication; Components of communication; Concepts and problems of communication; Forms of communication: verbal/ nonverbal; The general principles of communication; The general principles of communication; Communication and the Global Context; Strategies for Successful Speaking. Project Documentation and Presentation must be treated as compulsory part of this paper. Note for the instructor: make frequent use of worksheets in class and in homework assignments. Text Book 1. George Stern, Learners’ Writing in English Recommended Books 1. Hand outs: Synonyms, Antonyms, Idiomatic Phrases and Difference Between American and British English 2. Useful links: www.owl.english.purdue.edu

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

10

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐201 Year 2

Subject Title English‐III (Advance Communication Skills) Discipline English

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester III

Aims: To enable the students to meet their real life communication needs Contents: • Oral presentation skills (prepared and unprepared talks) • Preparing for interviews (scholarship, job, placement for internship, etc.) • Writing formal letters • Writing different kinds of applications (leave, job, complaint, etc.) • Preparing a Curriculum Vitae (CV), (bio-data) • Writing short reports Recommended Books 10. Ellen, K. 2002. Maximize Your Presentation Skills: How to Speak, Look and Act on Your Way to the Top 11. Hargie, O. (ed.) Hand book of Communications Skills 12. Mandel, S. 2000. Effective Presentation Skills: A Practical Guide Better Speaking 13. Mark, P. 1996. Presenting in English. Language Teaching Publications.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

11

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐202 Year 2

Subject Title Introduction to Literature‐III (Fiction & Non Fiction) Discipline English

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester III

Aims: To introduce the readers to fiction and prose. However instead of introducing full length texts of the novel, the readers would be required to do selected extracts from the novels mentioned in the reading list below. It will prepare them for the reading of full length texts of novels with an understanding of the elements of the novel such as plot, character, vision etc. A. Short Stories • Oscar Wilde: • O’ Henry: • Nadine Gordimer: • Guy de Maupassant: • D. H. Lawrence: • Issac Asimov: • James Joyce: • Rudyard Kipling: • O’Conor: • Kate Chopin: B. Extracts From Novels: • George Eliot • T. Hardy • Ernest Hemingway

The Nightingale and the Rose After Twenty Years Once Upon a Time The String The Fox True Love Araby The Man Who Would Be King Everything that Rises Must Sink The Story of an Hour

The Mill on the Floss. Book 4,Chapter 1 The Mayor of Casterbridge Chapter 26 A Farewell to Arms. Book One: Chapter 1 Book Two: Chapter 19.

Recommended Readings: 1. Baym, Nina. The Norton Anthology of American Lit. Vol. D. W. W. Norton & Company.2002. 2. Martin, Brian. Macmillan Anthology of Eng Lit. Vol. 4.Macmillan Pub Co. 1989. 3. Forster, E.M. Aspects of the Novel. Harvest Books.1956. 4. Bloom, Harold. George Eliot's the Mill on the Floss (Bloom's Modern Critical Interpretations). Chelsea House Pub. 1988. 5. Michie, Elsie B. Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre: A Casebook (Casebooks in Criticism). Oxford University Press, USA. 2006 6. Bloom, Harold. John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath (Bloom's Guides). Chelsea House Publications. 2005. 7. Gioia, Dana and Gwynn, R. S. The Art of the Short Story. Longman.2005. 8. Brown, Julia Prewitt. Cosmopolitan Criticism: Oscar Wilde's Philosophy of Art. University of Virginia Press. 1999. 9. Schoenberg, Thomas J. Twentieth Century Literary Criticism: Criticism of the Short Story Writers, and Other Creative Writers Who Lived between 1900 and 1999, from the First ... Curr (Twentieth Century Literary Criticism). Gale Cengage. 2005.
Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab 12

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges 10. Neill, Edward. Trial by Ordeal: Thomas Hardy and the Critics (Literary Criticism in Perspective). Camden House.1999. C. PROSE Aims: to make readers understand the distinct features of prose. The course will also be helpful for students in providing them with first class models of essays to improve their writing skills. The selection of the authors is chronological and starts with Bacon. 1. Francis Bacon: 2. Jonathan Swift: 3. Russell i. ii. i. ii. Of Youth and Age Of Friendship Gulliver’s Travels (Part 1) Eastern and Western Ideals of Happiness Authority versus Freedom in Education

Recommended Readings: 1. Walker, Hugh The English Essays and Essayists. S. Chand & Co. Delhi, 1959. 2. Gravil, Richard, ed. Gulliver’s Travels (Case-book Series). Macmillan, 1974. 3. Schoeman, R. (ed.) Bertrand Russell, Philosopher of the Century. Allen & Unwin.1967. 4. Leavis, John. Bertrand Russell, Philosopher and Humanist. New World Paperbacks. 1968. 5. Coleridge, Stephen. The Glory of English Prose. Tutis Digital Publishing Pvt. Ltd. 2008. 6. Yu, Margaret M. Two Masters of Irony: Oscar Wilde and Lytton Strachey. AMS Press.2008. 7. Coote, Stephen. The Penguin Short History of English Literature (Penguin Literary Criticism). Penguin.1994. Note: The recommended readings are optional and are provided to facilitate the aims and objectives of the syllabus. They are not to be taken as text books.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

13

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐203 Year 2

Subject Title Introduction to Linguistics‐III (Phonetics and English Phonology) Discipline English

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester III

Aims: to provide students with descriptive, analytical and applied knowledge about the sound system of English and varieties of English. Objectives: By the end of course the participants will be able to: • • • Analyse and describe the sound system of their own language; Analyse and describe the sound system of English language; and Identify the problems of English pronunciation.

Contents: 1. Introduction Stages in the production of speech Speech organs Manner of articulation 2. Segmental Phonology i. Phonemes and allophones Consonants Vowels Diphthongs and triphthongs ii. Syllable and syllabic structure Consonant clusters Syllable Word stress: nouns, verBA/BS, and adjectives 3. Suprasegmental Phonology i. Sounds in connected speech Weak forms Assimilation, elision and liaison 4. Contrastive Phonology Teaching of pronunciation Recommended Readings: 1. Burquest, D. A. (2001). Phonological analysis: A functional approach. Dallas: SIL 2. Cruttenden, Alan. 1994. Gimson’s Pronunciation of English. Oxford: Arnold. 3. Giegerich, Heinz. 1992. English Phonology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 4. Gimson, A. C. (1984). An introduction to the pronunciation of English. London: Arnold. 5. Jones, Charles. 1994. A History of English Phonology. London: Longman.
Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab 14

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges 6. 7. 8. 9. Kenworthy, J. (1987). Teaching English pronunciation. London: Longman. Knowles, G. (1987). Patterns of spoken English. London: Longman. Kreidler, C. W. (1989). The pronunciation of English. Oxford: Basil Blackwell. Roach, P. (1991). English phonetics and phonology: A practical course. Cambridge: Cambridge UP.

Note: The concepts listed in the syllabus contents may be acquired from sources other than those recommended.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

15

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐204 Year 2

Subject Title English‐IV (Advance Academic Reading and Writing) Discipline English

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester IV

Aims: To enable the students to: • Read Academics text critically • Write well organized academic text e.g. assignments, examination answers • Write narrative, descriptive, argumentative essays and reports (assignments) Contents: 1) Critical Reading Advanced reading skills and strategies building on Foundations of English I & II courses in semesters I and II of a range of text types e.g. description, argumentation, comparison and contrast 2) Advanced Academic Writing Advanced writing skills and strategies building on English I & II in semesters I and II: • Writing summaries of articles • report writing • Analysis and synthesis of academic material in writing • Presenting an argument in assignments/term-papers and examination answers Recommended Books 1. Aaron, J. 2003. The Compact Reader. New York: Bedford 2. Axelrod, R. B and Cooper, C.R. 2002. Reading Critical Writing Well: A Reader and Guide 3. Barnet, S. and Bedau, H. 2004. Critical Thinking, Reading and Writing: A Brief Guide to Writing. 6th Ed. 4. Behrens & Rosen. 2007. Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum. 5. Gardner, P. S. 2005. New Directions: Reading, Writing and Critical Thinking 6. George, D. and Trimbur, J. 2006. Reading Culture: Context for Critical Reading and Writing. 6th Ed. 7. Goatly, A. 2000. Critical Reading and Writing: An Introductory Course. London: Taylor & Francis 8. Grellet, F., Writing for Advanced Learners of English. CUP 9. Jordan, K. M. and Plakans, L. 2003. Reading and Writing for Academic Success 10. Jordon, R. R. 1999. Academic Writing Course. CUP. 11. Smith, L. C. 2003. Issues for Today: An Effective Reading Skills Text 12. Withrow, J., Effective Writing. CUP

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

16

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐205 Year 2 Aims:

Subject Title Introduction to Literature‐IV (History of Literature‐II) Discipline English

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester IV

This course will focus on some of the major literary movements of the 20th Century. The spirit of the course should be taken as an extension of the previous history course. Here, however, the students are to explore the history of Modern literature from the perspective of overlapping major literary trends and tradition of the time. For example, at its core, the course will explore the changing forms of Realism as a literary requirement during the 20th century. It will explore some of the divergent offshoots of Realism like Naturalism, Symbolism, Existentialism, Absurdism, Surrealism, and others. By its extension, it will be very challenging for the teachers to tackle controversial debates such as seeing modern and 20th century “Romanticism” as types of Realism! This course on the one hand supplements historical survey while on the other it offers an exposure to forms of Modern drama, fiction, and poetry, the courses to be offered in the coming semesters. Contents: • Realism • Naturalism • Symbolism • Modernism • Existentialism • Absurdism • Surrealism • Formalism • Structuralism / Poststructuralism • Post Modernism (New Historicism, Feminist Literary Theory) Recommended Readings: 1. Ashcroft, Bill, et al. The Empire Writes Back: Theory and Practice in Post-Colonial Literature. London: Routledge, 1989. (For Postcolonial Theory) 2. Belsey, Catherine. Critical Practice. London: Routledge, 1980. (For Marxist and Russian Formalist Theory) 3. Benvensite, Emile. Problems in General Linguistics. Miami: Miami UP, 1971. (For Linguistic, Structural, and Poststructuralist Theories) 4. Culler, Jonathan. The Pursuit of Signs: Semiotics, Literature, Deconstruction. London: Routledge, 1981. (For Reader-oriented Theory) 5. Docherty, Thomas. Ed. Postmodernism: A Reader. Hemal Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1992. (For Postmodern Theory) 6. Eagleton, Mary. Ed. Feminist Literary Criticism. London: Longman, 1991. (For Feminist Theory) 7. Eliot, T. S. Selected Essays. London: Faber, 1965. (For New Criticism, Moral Formalism, and F. R. Leavis)
Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab 17

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges Lodge, David. Ed. Twentieth Century Literary Criticism. London: Longman, 1972. (For Introduction) 9. Vincent B. Leitch (General Editor). The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. New York & London: W. W. Norton and Company, 2001 (or later editions). (For all the various approaches, and topic and author wise selections) 10. Wright, Elizabeth. Pychoanalytic Criticism: Theory in Practice. London: 1984. (For Pycho-analytic Theory) Note: The concepts listed in the syllabus contents may be acquired from sources other than those recommended. 8.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

18

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code Subject Title Cr. Hrs Semester ENG‐206 Introduction to Linguistics‐IV 3 IV Year Discipline 2 English Aims: The aim of this course is to provide the students with a general introduction to English morphology and syntax. The course introduces the students to the internal structure of words and sentences, presenting them to the theory and practice of the structural grammar of the English language. By the end of this course students will be able to do a detailed analysis of English morphemes as well as sentences. Contents: • Morphemes • Types of Morpheme • Morphemic analysis • Morphological productivity • Phrases and its types • Clauses • Sentences • Types of sentences • The Negative Transformation • The Passive Transformation • The Wh-Transformation • Word order Transformations • Agreement, case and movement • Syntactic analysis • Morpho-syntactic analysis Recommended Readings: 1. Aronoff, M., & Feudman, K. (2010). What is Morphology? (Second edition). John Wiley and Sons. 2. Booij, G. (2007). The Grammar of Words: an Introduction to Morphology. OUP. 3. Culicover, W.P.., & Jackendoff, R. (2005). Simpler Syntax. Oxford: OUP. 4. Kampson, R., Meyer-Viol, W., & Gabbay, D. (2001). Dynamic syntax: the Flow of Language Understanding. Blackwell Publishing. 5. Katamba, F. (2004). Morphology: Morphology and its relation to Semantics and the lexicon. Routledge. 6. Metthews, H. P. (1991). Morphology. (Second edition) Cambridge University Press. 7. Radford, A. (2004). English Syntax: an introduction. CUP. 8. Spenser, A. (1991). Morphological Theory. Wiley-Blackwell. 9. Spenser, A., & Zwicky, M. A. (Eds.), (2001). The Handbook of Morphology. WileyBlackwell.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

19

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges Note: The concepts listed in the syllabus contents may be acquired from sources other than those recommended.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

20

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐211 Year

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Subject Title Cr. Hrs Semester English‐III (Communication Skills) 3 III Discipline Botany, Zoology, Mathematics‐I,II, Statistics‐I,II,III, Chemistry‐I,II, Applied Psychology, Economics, Sociology & Sociocultural Studies, Social Work, Political Science, Physics, Mass 2 Communication, Islamic Education, History, Education (Secondary), Urdu, Education (Elementary) FORMAL LETTERS • The students are expected to be proficient in formal letter writing like Letters to the editor, public officials (WAPDA, WASA etc.) ADVANCED READING AND COMPREHENSION I • The students are required to read the given prose critically and answer the questions. Recommended Book: The St. Martin’s Guide to Writing by Rise B. Axelrod, Charles R. Cooper. Pub. St. Martin’s Press, 1988. (Page 18-19, 26-34, 49-55, 66-67, 77-80, 88-94, 104-105, 110115, 129-137) ORAL PRESENTATIONS • Strategies for oral presentation. • The students must learn how to give oral presentations and they should be able to give formal presentations. Recommended Book: Effective Business Communications. 7th Edition by Herta A. Murphy, Herbert W. Hildebrandt, Jane P. Thomas. Pub. Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi, 2009. (Page 384-399) CONNECTED PARAGRAPH WRITING AND PICTURE DESCRIPTION • The students are required to practice paragraph writing with an emphasis on Topic sentence and Supporting sentences. The students are supposed to write at least 3 connected paragraphs on a single theme (word limit: 350 words). • The students are required to learn how to analyze and describe pictures in correct English. Recommended Book: Paragraph Development: A Guide for Students of English as a Second Language by Martin L. Arnaudet, Mary Ellen Barrett. Pub. Prentice Hall College Div. 1981 (Page 179-185) VOCABULARY BUILDING SKILLS WORD ROOT METHOD Unit 7-11. Page No. 103-116. Recommended Book: Guide for GAT General Test. SMART BRAIN. GRE (General, Local) by Muhammad Idrees. Pub: Dogar Brothers. 2010-2011 edition.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

21

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐212 Year

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Subject Title Cr. Hrs Semester English‐IV (English for Practical Aims) 3 IV Discipline Botany, Zoology, Mathematics‐I,II, Statistics‐I,II,III, Chemistry‐I,II, Applied Psychology, Economics, Social Work, Political Science, 2 Physics, Mass Communication, Islamic Education, History, Education (Secondary), Urdu, Education (Elementary) PROFESSIONAL CORRESPONDENCE • CV and covering letter. • Follow up messages after the job interview. Recommended Book: Effective Business Communications. 7th Edition. By Herta A. Murphy, Herbert W. Hildebrandt, Jane P. Thomas. Pub. Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi, 2009. (Page 504-529, 540-548) ADVANCED READING AND COMPREHENSION II • The students are required to read the given prose critically and answer the questions. Recommended Book: The St. Martin’s Guide to Writing by Rise B. Axelrod, Charles R. Cooper. Pub. St. Martin’s Press, 1988. (Page 146-147, 152-155, 158-172) JOB INTERVIEWS • The students should learn to handle job interviews through “mock interviews”. Recommended Book: Effective Business Communications. 7th Edition. By Herta A. Murphy, Herbert W. Hildebrandt, Jane P. Thomas. Pub. Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi, 2009. (Page 539-539) ESSAY WRITING • The students should be able to compose essays of 4 to 6 paragraphs relying on what they have learnt in the previous semesters about paragraph writing. (Word Limit upto500 words) VOCABULARY BUILDING SKILLS WORD ROOT METHOD Unit 12-17. Page No. 116-131. Recommended Book: Guide for GAT General Test. SMART BRAIN. GRE (General, Local) by Muhammad Idrees. Pub: Dogar Brothers. 2010-2011 edition.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

22

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code Subject Title Cr. Hrs Semester ENG‐221 English‐III (Business Communication‐I) 3 III Year Discipline 2 Business Administration, Commerce 1. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS COMMUNICATION Recommended Books: Effective Business Communications. 7th Edition. By Herta A. Murphy, Herbert W. Hildebrandt, Jane P. Thomas. • Chapter 1: Effective Communication in Business • Chapter 2: The Seven C’s of Effective Communication 2. DESIGNING BUSINESS MESSAGES Recommended Books: Effective Business Communications. 7th Edition. By Herta A. Murphy, Herbert W. Hildebrandt, Jane P. Thomas. • Chapter 6: The Process of Preparing Effective Business Messages. • Chapter 7: The Appearance and Design of Business Messages. • Chapter 8: Good News and Neutral Messages. • Chapter 9: Bad News Messages. • Chapter 10: Persuasive Written Messages. 3. STRATEGIES FOR ORAL COMMUNICATION Recommended Books: Effective Business Communications. 7th Edition. By Herta A. Murphy, Herbert W. Hildebrandt, Jane P. Thomas. • Chapter 14: Strategies for Successful Speaking and Successful Listening Appendix A: Visual Aids in Business Communication • Chapter 15: Strategies for Successful Informative and Persuasive Speaking • Chapter 16: Strategies for Successful Interpersonal Communication 4. VOCABULARY BUILDING SKILLS WORD ROOT METHOD Unit 7-11. Page No. 103-116 Recommended Books: Guide for GAT General Test. SMART BRAIN. GRE (General, Local) by Muhammad Idrees. Pub: Dogar Brothers. 2010-11 edition.

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

23

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code Subject Title Cr. Hrs Semester ENG‐222 English‐IV (Business Communication‐II) 3 IV Year Discipline 2 Business Administration, Commerce 1. BUSINESS COMMUNICATION IN DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES Recommended Book: Effective Business Communications. 7th Edition. By Herta A. Murphy, Herbert W. Hildebrandt, Jane P. Thomas. • Chapter 3: Business Communication and the Global Context • Chapter 4: Business Communication and the Ethical Context • Chapter 5: Business Communication and the Technology Context 2. WRITTEN COMMUNICATION IN BUSINESS Recommended Book: Effective Business Communications. 7th Edition. By Herta A. Murphy, Herbert W. Hildebrandt, Jane P. Thomas. • Chapter11: Short Reports • Chapter 12: Long (Formal) Reports • Chapter 13: Proposals 3. JOB APPLICATION PROCESS Recommended Book: Effective Business Communications. 7th Edition. By Herta A. Murphy, Herbert W. Hildebrandt, Jane P. Thomas. • Chapter 18: The Job Application Process - The Written Job Presentation • Chapter 19: The Job Application Process - Interviews and Follow up 4. VOCABULARY BUILDING SKILLS WORD ROOT METHOD Unit 12-17. Page No. 116-131.

Recommended Books: 1. Guide for GAT General Test. SMART BRAIN. GRE (General, Local) by Muhammad Idrees. Pub: Dogar Brothers. 2010-2011 edition. 2. Paragraph Development: A Guide for Students of English as a Second Language by Martin L. Arnaudet, Mary Ellen Barrett. 3. English Language Communication Skills for B.Ed by Nadeem Aziz. Pub: Majeed Book Depot 4. Effective Business Communications. 7th Edition. By Herta A. Murphy, Herbert W. Hildebrandt, Jane P. Thomas. 5. Focus on Comprehension Book 4 by Peter Ellison. Pub: Learners Publishing Pet Ltd. Singapore, 2009. 6. The St. Martin’s Guide to Writing by Rise B. Axelrod, Charles R. Cooper. Pub. St. Martin’s Press, 1988. Websites: http://cdn.adventofdeception.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/pakistan_flood.jpg http://img2.allvoices.com/thumbs/event/609/480/62062094-greeting-after.jpg

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

24

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges Code ENG‐223 Year 2 Subject Title Writing Workshop (MAS) Discipline Mass Communication Cr. Hrs 3 Semester IV

o Letter writing o Application writing o Press releases (Pre-event/ Post-event) o Article writing o Feature writing o Editorial / Column writing Essay writing on social issues o Interview writing techniques o Script writing for talk shows Recommended books: o Feature Nigari (Urdu) BY Prof. Dr. Shafiq Jallandhary o Feature, Column Aur Tabsara (Urdu) BY Dr. Aslam Dogar o Feature writing for Newspapers and Magazines (Eng) BY Friedlan o Professional Feature Writing (Eng) BY Bruce Garrison o Writing and Selling Special Feature Articles (Eng) BY Helen Ratterson

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

25

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐231 Year 2

Subject Title Communication Skills (IT) Discipline Information Technology

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester III

The aim of this course is to develop good English writing, language usage and reading skills, to appreciate the importance of business communication and to develop understanding of communication concepts, principles, theories and problems. It will also help in developing good oral communication and presentation skills. The following topics will be covered in the course: Principles of writing good English, understanding the composition process, Comprehension and expression, Use of grammar and punctuation, Process of writing, observing, audience collecting, composing, drafting and revising, persuasive writing, reading skills, listening skills and comprehension, skills for taking notes, Business communications, planning messages, writing concise but with impact, Letter formats, mechanics of business, letter writing, letters, memo and applications, summaries, proposals, writing resumes, styles and formats, oral communications, verbal and nonverbal communication, conducting meetings, small group communication, taking minutes, Presentation skills, Presentation strategies, material gathering, material organization strategies, time management, opening and concluding, use of audio-visual aids, delivery and presentation. Text Book 1. Vawdrey, Stoddard, Bell, Practical Business English, ISBN-10: 0256102740 Recommended Book 1. Herta A. Murphy, Effective Business Communication, ISBN-10: 007044398X

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

26

BS (4 Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG‐232 Year 2

Subject Title Technical & Business Writing (IT) Discipline Information Technology

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester IV

The objective of this course is to upgrade students’ ability to write effectively in the world of science, technology and business, to produce experts and specialists in the business and technical writing, to enhance students’ skills for the effective delivery of technical information to audience (listeners or viewers). It will help the students to generate thorough understanding of common types of reports, special format items and other technical features of business documents, to develop verbal and non verbal communication skills for an effective display of personality. The following topics will be covered in the course: Business communication overview, Communication and organizational effectiveness, Process of creating effective messages, five planning steps and organizational plans, Different Forms of Written communication including Persuasive messages, Good News and Neutral messages, Bad News, Memorandum writing, Letter writing, Informative and positive messages, Academic, research and business proposals writing, Formal Report Writing, Business Research Methods, Documentation and Research Citation, Oral presentation, Strategies for an effective Audience Analysis, Non-verbal communication, Employment communication, Cross-cultural communication, Business Communication and the Ethical Contexts. Text Book 1. Greenfield, T., Research Methods, Guidance for Postgraduates, Arnold, 1996, ISBN10: 0340806567 Recommended Book 1. Handouts provided by the instructor

Center for Undergraduate Studies, University of the Punjab

27

BS (4 Ye ears) for A Affiliated Co olleges

Code ENG -30 01 Year Y 3

Subje Title ect Criticism and Theo I ory Discipline English

Cr. C Hrs 3

Se emester V

Aims: urse aims to understand the histori o d ical backgro ound to lite erary criticis explorin its sm, ng This cou developm ment in the light of som contemp me porary view wpoints. Ove erall, “Principles of Lit terary Criticism will focu much on the poetic and dramatic forms in order to highlight some m” us n c o significan trends an concepts around “poetry”, “imag nt nd gination” an “tradition The cour is nd n”. rse intended to be a que estion-raiser when it comes to askin oneself: why and ho to under ng ow rstand literature through criticism? Th question may grow comparati e he n w ively and specifically more relevant when the re eader of our part of the world is pe r ermitted to a ask: why to study “Eng glish” literature or literature in “Englis e es sh?” s: Contents Aristotle: Sidney: Dr. Johns son: orth: Wordswo Mathew Arnold: T. S. Elio ot:

The Poetic cs An Apolog For Poetr gy ry Preface to Shakespear re ads Preface to lyrical Balla nd Culture an Anarchy, Chap I Religion a Literatur and re

Recomm mended Read dings: nt ditor). The N Norton Antho ology of The eory and Crit ticism. New w 1. Vincen B. Leitch (General Ed York & L London: W. W. Norton a Compan 2001 (or later edition and ny, ns) 2. K. M. Newton, ed. Twentieth Century liter rary Theory: A Reader. Second Edit tion. NewYo ork: St. Marti in’s, 1998 (o later editio or ons) 3. Raman Selden, & Peter Widdo n owson. A Re eader’s Guid to Contem de mporary Liter rary Theory. 3rd Edition. K Kentucky: Univ. of Ken U ntucky, 1993 (or later edi itions) 4. Selecte Terminol ed logy from an Contempo ny orary Diction nary of Liter rary Terms. Note: Th recommen he nded reading are option and are provided to fa gs nal facilitate the aims and objective of the syllabus. They a not to be taken as tex books. es are e xt

BS (4 Years) for r Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG -30 02 Ye ear 3 Aims:

Subject Title t Poetr (14th to 1 ry 18th Centur ry) Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester V

• To focus on a gen nre-specific h historical de evelopment. • To pe erceive Poetr as refined commentar on the aesthetic conce of its tim ry d ry erns me. • To de evelop keen awareness o poetic lang of guage and to one. Contents s: 1. Chaucer 2. Spense er 3. Milton n 4. John D Donne Pro ologue to the Canterbury Tales e y Th Faerie Que (Book 1. Canto 1) he een Par radise Lost B Book 1. Lo & Divine Poems ove e o The Anniversarie o The Blosso ome o Thou hast m made me, An shall thy work decay nd y o This is my playes last s scene, here h heavens appo oint

Recomm mended Read dings: ms, he d 1. Abram M. H, Th Mirror and the Lamp. 2. Bowde Muriel. A Commenta on the G en, ary General Prolo ogue to the C Canterbury T Tales, NewY York: Macmilla 1960 an, 3. Coghil Nevil. Th Poet Chau ll, he ucer. Oxford, ,1948 4. Gardner, Helen, Ed. John Don Twentie Century V nne: eth View Series 5. Spens, Janet. Spen , nser’s Faerie Queene: An Interpretati London 1934 n ion, n 6. Tillots G. On th Poetry of Pope son, he f Note: Th recommen he nded reading are option and are provided to fa gs nal facilitate the aims and objective of the syllabus. They a not to be taken as tex books. es are e xt

BS (4 Yea ars) for Aff filiated Col lleges
Cr. Hrs 3 Semester V

Code ENG-30 03 Ye ear 3

Subject Title t Nove (18th & 1 el 19th Centur ry) Discipline D English E

Aims: • T Aim of in The ntroducing this course is to enable th readers to have a full view of 18th to s he o h 19th century. Novel which is rich in d N h diversity, crea ativity and p popular appe eal.

Contents s: • lding: • Henry Fiel • • Jane Auste en: • • Charles Di ickens: • • Thomas Hardy:

Joseph Andrews Emma Hard T Times Tess of the D’Urbe f ervilles

Recomm mended Read dings: • • • • • • 1.Allen, Walt The Rise of the Novel. London: Penguin ter. e 2. Allen, Wal lter. The Eng glish Novel. London: Pe enguin 3. Bloom Har rold. Ed. Mo odern Critica Views: Th al homas Hardy 1987 y, 4. Bloom, Ed Modern Cr d. ritical Interp pretations: Ja Austen, 1 ane 1987 5. Bloom, Ed Modern Cr d. ritical Views Charles Dickens, 1987 s: 7. 6. Kettle, Arn nold. An Intr roduction to the English Novel. Vols s.1&2. 2nd e Hutchinson, ed. 1967.

Note: Th recommen he nded reading are option and are provided to fa gs nal facilitate the aims and ob bjectives of the syllabus They are n to be take as text bo s. not en ooks.
• • • • Sayeed, Khalid Bin. Politics in Pakistan: Nature and D d s Direction of C Change. Np,n nd d olitical System of Pakistan Boston: Hou m ughton Mifflin 1967 n. Sayeed, Khalid Bin. The Po th Ziring, Lawren Pakistan in the 20 C Z nce. n Century: A Po olitical Histo Karachi: Oxford Univ ory. versity Pr ress, 1997 Muhammad Raza Kazmi, Pakistan Stu M R udies Core Te exts for Coll leges and Un niversities, O Oxford University Press (2006) U

BS (4 Ye ears) for A Affiliated Colleges
Subject Title t Journalistic Discourse J Discipline D English E Cr. Hrs 3 Semester V

Code ENG-30 04 Ye ear 3

The cour offers a rigorous test to improve the non-fict rse r tion writing a abilities of s students serio ously consideri a career in journali ing r ism. By reading award-winning au uthors; repor rting and wr riting non-fictio pieces an critiquing each other work, stu on nd g r’s udents will gain experti in writin for ise ng journalist purposes. In depth, th course w teach stu tic his will udents to write reports an feature sto nd ories. They wil learn to ga ll ather and org ganize mater rial, develop feature and editorial wr p d riting techni iques. Reading from the selected literar texts and then assign writing d ry d ned drills virtually every cla on ass topics lik accidents, crime, gove ke , ernment, and courts, etc will be part of the pract d tice. This pra actice shall then be combined with writ n ting features, profiles, an the art of narrative sto telling. nd ory Contents: Primary Te exts Journalis writings of: stic o Eqbal A Ahmed Murd of Metro der opolis Feud Culture & Violence dal Betw ween Past an Future, Se nd elected essay on ys Sout Asia (Published by Ox th xford Univer rsity Press, 2004) o Robert F Fisk The Jargon Disease ands upright at the bottom of the sea m The ship that sta Warrior: Sele ected Writin ngs The Age of the W (Pub blished by Fo Estate (H orth Harpen Coll lins), 2008) o William Dalrympal od acks, Lahore 19997 e, Bloo on the Tra The Age of Kali (Published b Penguin, 1998) by ts: Concept urse re: • Discou structur sentence, dialogue • Discou urse: themat developm tic ment mended Read dings: Recomm 1Cook, G. 1989 Discourse. Brown, G. an G. Yule. 1983. Disco nd ourse Analys sis. 1. B 2. L Leech, Geof ffrey and Tho omas, Jenny 1988. Prag y. gmatics: The State of the Art e e 3. L Levinson, St tephen. 1983 Pragmatic 3. cs 4. W Wardhaugh, Ronald. 198 How Con 85. nversation W Works. 5. W Wodak, R. and Meyer, M 2002. Me a M. ethods of Cri itical Analys sis. 6. J Johansen, Jø ørgen Dines. 2002. Litera Discours A Semiot ary se: tic-Pragmati Approach to ic

Literature 7. Carter, Ronald and Paul Simpson. 1988. Language, Discourse and Literature: An Introductory Reader in Discourse 9. Todorov, Tzvetan and Catherine Porter. 1990. Stylistics Genres in Discourse 10. Pratt, Mary Louise. 1981. Toward a Speech Act Theory of Literary Discourse 11. Knight, Robert M. 2010. Journalistic Writing: Building the Skills, Honing the Craft 12. Stovall, James Glen. 2011. Writing for the Mass Media (8th Edition) 13. Kershner, James W. 2011. Elements of News Writing (3rd Edition 14.Camenson, Blythe. 2007. Careers in Writing (McGraw-Hill Professional Careers) 15. Lieb, Thom. 2008. All the News: Writing and Reporting for Convergent Media 16. Pape, Susan and Susan Featherstone. 2006. Feature Writing: A Practical Introduction 17. Fontaine, Andre and William A. Glavin. 1991. The Art of Writing Nonfiction 18. Wray, Cheryl Sloan. 2004. Writing for Magazines: A Beginner's Guide Note: The concepts listed in the syllabus contents may be acquired from sources other than those recommended.

BS (4 Yea ars) for Aff filiated Colleges
Code ENG-30 05 Ye ear 3 Subject Title t Socioling guistics Discipline D English E Cr. Hrs 3 Semester V

Aims & Objectives: : At the end of this course stud s dents will be able to dem monstrate awareness of so ocial pheno omena and factors that a relevant t language use with spe f are to ecial referenc to ce Pakis stan. Contents s: Function of Language in Society ns y • Do omains of La anguage Use • Var riation and Variety in La V anguage • Spe eech Commu unity • Dia alects, Accen Register Pidgin an Creoles nts, rs, nd • Nat tional Langu uage, Standa Language ard • Lan nguage, Cult ture and Tho ought • Mu ultilingualism and Biling m gualism • Dim mensions of bilingualism f m • Bil lingualism an Diglossia nd a • Cau of bilin uses ngualism • Eff fects of bilin ngualism a. Language conflicts s b. Langu uage attitudes s c. Language mainten nance uage shift d. Langu e. Language death

Recomm mended Read dings: Peter (Ed). 1998. Code-switching in Conversatio Languag Interaction and 1 n on: ge n 1. Auer, P Identity. London: Ro outledge. on, 6. guistics. Cam mbridge: Cam mbridge Univ versity Press s. 2. Hudso R.A. 1996 Socioling 3. Suzann Romaine. 1995. Bilin ne ngualism (2n Ed). Oxfo Basil Blackwell. nd ord: 4. Trudgi P. 2002. Introduction to Languag and Socie ill, n ge ety. 5. Wardh haugh, R. 2006. An Intro oduction to S Sociolinguist tics. Oxford: Basil Black kwell. Note: Th recommen he nded reading are option and are provided to fa gs nal facilitate the aims and Ob bjectives of the syllabus They are n to be take as text books. s. not en

BS (4 Y Years) for A Affiliated C Colleges

Code ENG-30 06 Ye ear 3 Aims:

Subject Title t Visionary D V Discourse Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester V

• To fam miliarize stu udents with t concept o having a h the of harmonizing vision for the future g • To ex xplore the su ubjects that g great men hav considere of value ve ed • To discover the coherence tha makes for an effective discourse ( at r e (speech/letter r/essay) • To tra the comm stylistic and themat ground in the discour taught ace mon c tic n rses Contents s: Selection of speeche ns es/letters/writings of: • The T Truce of Hudaibiya-a ca of conflic resolution Causes and Consequen ase ct n. d nces lead ding to battle of Khyber. e • Allam Muhamm Iqbal: K ma mad Khutaba Allahbad and his last five let s tters to the Q Quaid. • Quaid e Azam M Ali Jinnah’ speech: Constitutional Assembly A 14, 194 Eid ul ’s l Aug 47; Azh Oct, 24 19 ha 947; Radio P Pakistan Lah hore. Oct 30, 1947; Quet Municipa tta ality addr June 15, 1948; open ress ning of State Bank of Pa e akistan July 1 1,1948. • Abra aham Lincoln The Gatsb Address. n: by • Chief Seattle’s sp f peech 1854 • Nelso Mandela’ release speech on ’s • Proto ocols of the Jewish Elder of Zion J rs mended Read dings: Recomm rat A gha: n iqyyah & ins structions 1. Hazr Ali bin Abu Talib, Nahajul Balag Sermon ash-shiqshi to his soldiers and ambassado s d ors. 2. Cook Guy. 1989 Discourse Oxford: Ox k, 9. e. xford Unive ersity Press. 3. Blac Elizabeth 2006. Prag ck, h. gmatic Stylis stics. Edinbu urgh: Edinbu urgh Univers Press. sity 4. Tool Michael lan, l.1998. Lang guage in Lite erature. New York: Arno w old. 5. Crys David. 1998. Redisc stal, 1 cover Gramm London Longman. mar. n: 6. John nston, Barbar 2008. Dis ra. scourse Ana alysis. Oxfor Blackwel rd: ll. he d f is ded y ual ties Note: Th length and number of discourses i to be decid upon by the individu universit ac ccording to th credit hou requireme of the co he ur ent ourse

BS (4 Ye ears) for Af ffiliated Co olleges

Code ENG-30 07 Ye ear 3

Subject Title t Cr riticism and Theory II d Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester VI V

Aims: To famil liarize stude ents with tex that dea with theo xts al ories about c criticism, w where they w would encounte philosoph er hical and cri itical though on select topics. T hts ted This course in line with the h topics ta aken up in literary mov l vements wou prepare the student for critica and analy uld ts al ytical analysis o texts and help them in their resear work. of n rch s: Contents Oscar W Wilde Plotinus ume David Hu Ngugi W Thiongo Wa Th Critic as a Artist (No he an orton, 900-91 13) On the Intellec n ctual Beauty (Norton, 17 74-185) Of the Standar of Taste (N f rd Norton, 486-499) On Abolition o the Englis Department (Norton, n of sh 2092-2097) Ronald B BarthesFrom Mythologie (Norton, 1 m es 1461-1470) Georg W Wilhelm Fried drich Hegel Lectures on Fine Arts (N Norton, 636-645) Mary Wo ollstonecraft Vindication of the Rights of Wom (Norton 586-594) tA man n, Terry Ea agletonIntrod duction to Li iterary Theor An Introduction ry: Sigmund FreudThe Interpretation of Dreams (Norton, 91 d I n s 19-956) Charles B BaudelaireTh Painter of Modern Li (Norton, 792-802) he ife mended Read dings: Recomm nt ditor). The N Norton Antho ology of The eory and Crit ticism. New w 1. Vincen B. Leitch (General Ed York & London: W. W. Norton and Company, 2001 (o later editio W n or ons) 2. K. M. Newton, ed. Twentieth Century Lite erary Theory A Reader. Second Edi y: . ition. New York: S Martin’s, 1998 (or lat editions) St. , ter 3. Raman Selden & Peter Widdo n P owson. A Reader’s Guide to Contem e mporary Liter rary Theory. 3rd Edi ition. Kentuc cky: Univ. o Kentucky, 1993 (or lat editions) of , ter 4. Selecte Terminol ed logy from an Contempo ny orary Diction nary of Liter rary Terms. Note: Th recommen he nded reading are option and are provided to fa gs nal facilitate the aims and ob bjectives of the syllabus. They are no to be taken as text boo t . ot n oks.

BS (4 Y Years) for Affiliated Colleges

Code ENG-30 08 Ye ear 3 Aims:

Subject Title t Classics in Drama Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester VI V

The cour will pres rse sent some cl lassic plays which have influenced the develop e pment of En nglish drama. It will represe various f t ent forms for ex xample trage and com edy medy and thei variations. The ir course is designed to impart, disc o cuss, evaluat and abov all enjoy th spirit of c te, ve he classics in dr rama. The soci io-cultural aspects of so a ociety reflec cted in the d drama of th selected a he ages will als be so highlight ted. Students will be ab to apply their knowledge of the elements o drama to their ble e of critical re eading. Contents s: 1. Sophocles: opher Marlo owe: 2. Christo 3. Shakes speare: 4. Shakes speare: 5. Ibsen: mended Read dings: Recomm 1. Justina Gregory, A Companion to Greek T a n Tragedy, Bla ackwell, 2005. 2. H. D. F Kitto, Gre Tragedy London an New York Routledge 2002. F. eek y, nd k: e, 3. Shawn O’ Bryhim Greek and Roman Com n m, medy: Transl lations and I Interpretation of ns Four R Representativ Plays, Un ve niversity of T Texas Press, 2002. 4. Consta ance B. Kuri iyama, Chris stopher Marl lowe: A Ren naissance Lif Ithca: Cor fe rnell Univer rsity Press, 2002 2 5. Patrick Cheney, Th Cambridg Companion to Christo k he ge opher Marlo owe, Cambri idge: C UP, 20 004 6. Barber C. L. Shak r, kespeare’s Festive Come edy. Princeto 1959 on: 7. Bloom Harold. Sh m, hakespeare: The Inventio of the Hu on uman. Londo Fourth Estate, 1999 on: 8. Bradle A. C. Sha ey, akespearean Tragedy (22 Ed.). Lo 2nd ondon: 1929 9. Chamb bers, E. K. Shakespeare: A Survey. N York: H and Wan Macmill 1925 S : New Hill ng, lan, 10. Danb John F. Shakespeare’ Doctrine o Nature. Lo by, S ’s of ondon: 1949 9 11. Eagle eton, Terry. William Sha akespeare. N York: B New Blackwell, 19 986 12. Elliot G. R. Flam t, ming Ministe Durham, NC, 1953 er. 13. Eriks Peter. Rewriting Sha son, R akespeare, R Rewriting Ou ur-selves. Be erkley: U of California P P, 1991 Note: Th recommen he nded reading are option and are provided to fa gs nal facilitate the aims and ob bjectives of the syllabus. They are no to be taken as text boo t . ot n oks. Oedipu Rex us Dr Faustus Macbet th Twelfth Night h Doll’s H House

BS (4 Yea ars) for Aff filiated Col lleges
Code ENG-30 09 Ye ear 3 Subject Title t 19th Centur Poetry 1 ry Discipline D English E Cr. Hrs 3 Semester VI V

The scop of this cou does no admit the first Roman Moveme of the gia like Spe pe urse ot ntic ent ants enser, Sidney a Shakespeare etc. Th is also w and his worth mentio oning that th romantic literature in fact, he n starts fro the grave om eyard school of the 18th century pri l h imarily know for its cl wn lassic taste. P Poets like Gold dsmith and Gray are just G tifiably know as precur wn rsors of roma anticism. Ho owever, the s scope of this c course does not admit them as pa of its reading as we The per art ell. riod of rom mantic aesthetics covered un nder this cou starts fro 1789 wit the advent of Blake’s work. This i the urse om th is romantic revival per riod in which Blake, Wordsworth, C Coleridge, S Shelley, Byr ron, Keats, L Lamb etc establ its imme lish ense poetic a prosaic r and richness. Aims: To devel in the rea lop ader and awa areness of th second wave of the R he Romantics an to enable them nd to disting guish betwe the poet of the age keeping in mind the similarities that group them een ts e n together. Contents s: Sel lections from Songs of I m Innocence an Songs of Experience.The nd Div Image, Infant Sorro Earth’s A vine ow, Answer. 2. William Wordswo m orth: “The Thorn”; “ “Old Cumbe erland Begga “Lines W ar”; Written in Early Sprin “Lines”; “Lucy Poem “Lucy Gray”; “Rut ng”; ; ms”; th” 3.S.T. Co oleridgeKub Khan, Dej bla ejection: An Ode 4.John K Keats:“Ode to Nightingal “Ode on a Grecian U o le”; n Urn”; 5.Shelley y:“Ode to the West Wind “Hymn t Intellectua Beauty”; e d”; to al 1. William Blake m Recomm mended Read dings: rd T and 1987. 1. Edwar Dowden, The French Revolution a English Literature. 1 2. J.G. R Robertson, St tudies in the Genesis of R Romantic Th heory in the Eighteen Ce entury. 1923 3. F. R. L Leavis, Reva aluation: Tra adition and D Development in English Poetry. 1936 t 6 4. Cleant Brooks, The Well-Wr th T rought Urn: S Studies in th Structure of Poetry. 19 he 947 5. M. H. Abrams, Th Mirror and the Lamp: Romantic T he d Theory and C Critical Trad dition. 1954 6. M. H. Abrams, ed., English Ro omantic Poe Modern E ets Essays in Cri iticism. 1960 0 7. David V. Erdman, ed, The Poe and Pros of William Blake. 196 etry se m 66. 8. S. F. D Damon, Will liam Blake: H Philosop and Sym His phy mbolism. 192 24 9. J. V. B Baker, The Sacred River: Coleridge’s Theory of Imagination 1957 S n.

10. J. B. Beer, Coleridge the Visionary. 1959 11. W. J. Bate, ed., Keats: A Collection of Critical Essays. 1964 12. George Barnett, Charles Lamb: The Evolution of Elia. 1964 13. G. M. Ridenour, Shelley, A Collection of Critical Essays. 1965 14. Bennett Weaver, Wordsworth: Poet of the Unconquerable Mind. 1965. (A psychological approach) Note: The recommended readings are optional and are provided to facilitate the aims and objectives of the syllabus. They are not to be taken as text books.

BS (4 Yea ars) for Aff filiated Colleges
Code ENG-31 10 Ye ear 3 Subject Title t Fanta asy Discipline D English E Cr. Hrs 3 Semester VI V

Course D Description: Some of the earliest works of fic ction tell of t fantastic adventures of brave her the roes and her roines who enco ounter stran and mys nge sterious crea atures, some of whom a monstrou some ang are us, gelic, some of whom utiliz arcane lor or magic, and who en realms o the imagi ze re nter of ination outsi of ide l d s ld y. obots and science the usual constructs of time and space. This is the worl of Fantasy Add in ro and expe eriments wit time trave life and m in the f th el, man future and y get the w you world of Science Fiction! In this c course stude ents will rea and anal ad lyze some s significant e elements in Science Fi iction &Fantasy a genre th overlaps myth, scienc fiction, an the super y, hat ce nd rnatural; but also differs from the tradit tional norms and each ot ther in tone, theme, settin and overa effect. ng all Course O Outline: In this co ourse student will devel their und ts lop derstanding o the conven of ntions of thi genre as is well as st tudy texts by writers wh y hose works h have become literary “cla e assics” or are a part of e today’s p popular fictio We will read both cla on. assics of the genre and s e some of the m popula most ar works of contempora writers. H f ary However due to the shor duration of the course, majority of e rt f , f the work chosen wil be either s ks ll short stories or novellas. Aims: • Introd duce student to the uniq voice of Science Fict ts que tion and Fan ntasy. • Encou urage studen to evaluat the literatu they read on the mer of its cont rather th nts te ure d rit tent han its pr resence or ab bsence in the literary wor e rld. • Increa their und ase derstanding o the histori & literar origins of Science Fic of ical ry f ction and Fantas sy. • Broad their kno den owledge of c classic and p popular work of Science Fiction and Fantasy ks e d beyon their prio experience nd or e. s: Contents • Wells, H. G.“The Door in the Wall” , • Asimo ov,Isaac “Ro obbie” • Shelle ey,Mary W. “The Mortal Immortal” “ l • Gaima an,Neil “Gol liath” • King, Stephen “W Word Process of the Go sor ods” • J K Ro owling“The Harry Potter Book I r”

• J R R Tolkien “Riddles in the Dark ” Recommended Readings: 1. The Fall of the House of Usher, Edgar Allan Poe. 2. Young Goodman Brown, Nathaniel Hawthorne. 3. The Old Nurse's Story, Elizabeth (Cleghorn) Gaskell. 4. The Body Snatcher, Robert Louis Stevenson. 5. Dracula's Guest, Abraham (“Bram”) Stoker. 6. The Colour Out of Space, H(oward) P(hillips) Lovecraft. 7. The Howling Man, Charles Beaumont. 8. The Raft, Stephen (Edwin) King. 9. Nightcrawlers, Robert R(ichard) McCammon. 10. Red as Blood, Tanith Lee (Kaiine). 11. Troll Bridge, Neil (Richard) Gaiman. 12. The Clock That Went Backward, Edward Page Mitchell. 13. An Express of the Future, Jules (Gabriel) Verne. 14. The Star, H(erbert) G(eorge) Wells. 15. A Princess of Mars, Edgar Rice Burroughs. 16. Robot Nemesis, E(dward) E(lmer) “Doc” Smith. 17. Robbie, Isaac Asimov. 18. The Long Watch, Robert A(nson) Heinlein. 19. There Will Come Soft Rains, Ray(mond Douglas) Bradbury. 20. The Sentinel, Arthur C(harles) Clarke. 21. Mousetrap, Andre Norton. 22. Exiles of Tomorrow, Marion Zimmer Bradley. 23. The Engine at Heartspring's Center, Roger (Joseph) Zelazny. 24. Ender's Game, Orson Scott Card. 25. The Plague Star, George R(aymond) R(ichard) Martin. 26. Remaking History, Kim Stanley Robinson. 27. The Purchase of Earth, Jack Williamson. 28. Lewis Carroll Through the Looking Glass 29. C.S. Lewis The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (Book 1: Chronicles of Narnia) 30. Robert A. Heinlein Double Star / The Door into Summer / The Past Through Tomorrow 31. J.R.R. Tolkien The Hobbit / Riddles in the Dark 32. H. G. Wells The Time Machine 33. Arthur C. Clarke Rendezvous with Rama 34. Shirley Jackson The Lottery 35. Marion Zimmer Bradley Exiles of Tomorrow 36. Phillip K. Dick We Can Remember It for You Wholesale 37. Orson Scott Card Ender’s Game 38. Philip Pullman The Golden Compass Note: The recommended readings are optional and are provided to facilitate the aims and objectives of the syllabus. They are not to be taken as text books.

BS (4 Y Years) for A Affiliated C Colleges

Code ENG-31 11 Ye ear 3

Subject Title t World Literatures in Transla s ation Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester VI V

Aims: After com mpleting the course stud e dents will be able to unde erstand the c complexities of translatio from one language to the other – i this case f on in from English to Urdu an from Urdu h nd u to Englis – through studying tra sh anslations. T They will be expected to demonstrate their e knowledg and skills in translatio ge s on. Contents Primary Text s: T • Albert Camus (Fre t ench and Alg gerian): • Cervan ntes, M (Spa anish): • Kafka Franz (Ger a, rman): • Rumi (Persian):

Iqbal, Mo ohammad (U Urdu):

Faiz, Ahm Faiz (U med Urdu) Bulleh S Shah (Punjab bi):

Rehman Baba (Pasht tu): armast: Sachal Sa

The Outside (Chapter 2 & 5) er Don Quixot (Part 1-Bo 1) te ook Metamorph hosis (Short S Story) I will beguile with the T Tongue, A New Rule, O 2180 tra by A.J. Ode ans. Arberry. he s. Secrets of th Self trans by R.A. Nicholson Last Night, Speak, O Restless Heart trans. V.G. Kie .by ernan. He Who is S Stricken by Love, Not a Believer I Inside the M Mosque, Am I This I, Love – O B Bulleh – Torm menting Uni ique trans. by Ta aufiq Rafat. My Lord, T Way of t World The the Friend this i the only W We is Way, are- what ar we? re

Concept ts: • Langu uage, Culture and Society e y • The co oncept of un niverse of dis scourse • Lingui istic relativit ty • Seman compete ntic ence • Comparative Morp phology, Sy yntax, and Se emantics • Transl latability, Ex xpressibility and Effabili ity Recomm mended Read dings: 1. Baker, Mona. 1992 In Other W , 2. Words: A Co oursebook on Translation. London: R n Routledge.

2. Bell, Roger T. 1994. Translation and Translating. London: Longman. 3. de Beaugrande, Robert-Alain and Dressler, Wolfgang. 1983. Introduction to Text Linguistics. London: Longman. 4. Catford, John C. 1965. A Linguistic Theory of Translation: an Essay on Applied Linguistics. London: Oxford University Press. 5. Duff, Alan. 1991 (2004). Translation. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 6.Fawcett, Peter. 6. 1997. Translation and Language: Linguistic Theories Explained. Manchester: St Jerome Publishing. 7. 7.Guenthner, F and Guenthner-Reutter (eds). 1978. Meaning and Translation: Philosophical and Linguistic Approaches. London: Duckworth. 8.Kenny, Dorothy. 8. 1998. “Equivalence,” in the Routledge Encyclopaedia of Translation Studies, edited by Mona Baker, London and New York: Routledge, 77-80. 9. 9.Nida, Eugene A. 1964. Towards a Science of Translatin. Leiden: E. J. Brill. 10. 10 Nida, Eugene A. and C. R.Taber. 1982. The Theory and Practice of Translation. Leiden: 11. E. J. Brill. 12. 11Kussmaul, Paul. 1995. Training the Translator. John Benjamins Publishing Co. 12.Kress, Gunther. 13. 1989. Linguistic Process in Sociocultural Practice (2nd Ed). Oxford: Oxford University Press. 13.Newmark, Peter. 1995. A Textbook of Translation. Library of Congress: Cataloguingin-Publication Data.

BS (4 Yea ars) for Aff filiated Colleges
Code ENG-40 01 Ye ear 4 Subject Title t H 20TH Century B British Liter rature : Poetry & Dram ma Discipline D English E Cr. Hrs 3 Semester VII V

Aims: The aim of this par of the cou rt urse in liter rature is to give the reader an opp portunity to read represent tative works of 20th cen s ntury writers including p s poets, drama atists and no ovelists. It w would th enhance their unders standing of t emergin trends in 20 century literature a prepare them the ng y and for full le ength study of the genres o s. Poetry • • • • Drama • • • Samuel Beck kett Edward Bond E d Harold Pinter H r Wa aiting for Go odot The Sea Mo ountain Lang guage W.B. W Yeats T.S.Eliot T Auden A Ted T Hughes Dia alogue of Se and Soul, Byzantium. elf The Wasteland d, Pa artition Wo odwo, Thrushes

Recomm mended Read dings: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Beach J.W. The Twentieth C h, Century Nov 1952. vel. Kettl Arnold. Introduction to the Eng le, I n glish Novel I London: Hutchinson 1978. II. n, Luml Fredrik Trends in 20th Centur Drama. F ley, k. ry Fairlawn: 1956, revised 1960. d Gass sner, John. Form and Id in Mode Theatre. New York: 1954. F dea ern . : Boult ton, Marjor The Ana rie. atomy of Poe etry. London Routledg and Kega Paul, 197 n: ge an 77. Unter recker, J. W.B. Yeats: A Reader’s G Guide (Londo 1988) on, Spear Monroe K. The Poetr of W.H. A rs, K ry Auden. (New Jersey, 198 w 81) Note: The recommend readings are option and are provided to facilitate the r ded nal e e aims and objecti ives of the s syllabus. Th are not to be taken as text boo hey oks.

BS (4 Yea ars) for Aff filiated Col lleges

Code ENG-40 02 Ye ear 4

Subject Title t 20th C Century Fic ction & Pro ose Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester VII V

This cour is design to offer t student a sense of the 20th Centu literary, s rse ned the e ury social and political context. It offers insight into the lit o ts terary artists and intellec ctuals of our times. Aims: This course introduces students t the Mode English N to ern Novel and P Prose in its h historical co ontext lopment. They will a T also be able to identify and respo e y ond to elem ments of lit terary of devel experime entation in th field of pr he rose writing and fiction. Fiction • • • • • Prose • • Edward Said E George Orwe G ell Introdu uction to Cul lture and Imp perialism Shootin an Elepha ng ant. Virginia Woo V olf E. E M. Foster Jo oseph Conra ad Ja ames Joyce Doris Lessing D g nted (A ry) A Haun House ( Short Stor A Passa to India age Heart o Darkness of The Portrait of an A Artist as a Y Young Man In the N National Gal llery

mended Read dings: Recomm
1. 2. 3.

Said, Edward. Culture and Imperialism C m Cas sebook Serie es Har rold Bloom Series

Note: T recomm The mended read dings are op ptional and are provide to facilita the aims and ed ate s ob bjectives of the syllabu They are not to be ta f us. e aken as text books. t

BS (4 Yea ars) for Aff filiated Col lleges

Code ENG-40 03 Ye ear 4

Subject Title t American L A Literature Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester VII V

Aims & Objectives: : Poetry The cour focuses on connecti rse ing diverse Western m movements su as Real uch lism, Natura alism, Romantic cism, Transc cendentalism Modernism etc as the influence multiple tre m, m, ey ends in Ame erican literary h heritage and nationalism It will h d m. highlight em merging trend as they culminate in the ds n opening of democra vistas al atic long with re epercussions of industri and scientific expan s ial nsion. Race gen nder and cl lass equatio reinterpr ons reted the ce entral meaning of Ame erica and o the of changing social and economic values. W g d c Whether we follow a s simple chro onology or draw connectio through themes and genres, the final objecti of this course is to lo for the s ons ive ook sense of democ cratic diversi amid the constitution unity of t US. ity nal the This part of the course surveys th origins of American literary mov t he f vements with reference t the h to represent tative writer chosen. It sets som direction to the study of specific trends in the rs me n n American Novel. It stresses t diversity and uniqu n I the y ueness of t America character and the an r experienc and its foundational voices o self-accla ce, of aimed Purita holiness along with the an h revolutio onary expans sions of the so called patriots. I also highl e It lights variou phases o the us of American Renaissan n nce, Romant awarenes and Transcendentalis the Civi War, scientific tic ss sm, il progress, dreams of American su , A uccess, and s several voice of social p es protest.

Poetry • • • • • • Walt W Whitma Leaves of Grass – So of Myself (lines1 to 139) an: f ong f Emily Dickin E nson: Poem 4 This was a poet – It is that, 448 Poem 43 Much Ma 35 adness is div vinest sense, Robert Frost: Mending W R Walls, The Ro Not Tak oad ken Sylvia Plath: Daddy, Lad Lazarus dy Elizabeth Bis E shop: Filling Station, In t Waiting Room, the Richard Wilb : The Wr R bur riter, The De of a Toa eath ad.

Fiction • • • • • Mark Twain: The Story of a good Little Boy & The Story of a Bad Little Boy Faulkner: A Rose for Emily Flannery O’Connor: A Good Man is Hard to Find Alice Walker: Everyday Use Morrison: Jazz Drama: • • Eugene O’Neill Arthur Miller Long Days Journey into Night Death of a Salesman

Recommended Readings:
1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Bigsby, C.W.E. A Critical Introduction to Twentieth Century American Drama: I, 19001940; II Williams, Miller, Albee; III Beyond Broadway, 1982-85 Modern Critical Interpretation on each dramatist and work. edited by Harold Bloom, 1980s editions Bigsby, C.W.E. 2000. Modern American Drama1945-2000.Cambridge:Cambridge University Press. Bigsby,Christopher. 1999.Contemporary American Playwrights. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press. Pfister,Manfred.1993. The Theory and Analysis of Drama. Cambridge:Cambridge University Press.

Recommended Readings: 1. The recommended readings are optional and are provided to facilitate the aims and objectives of the syllabus. They are not to be taken as text books.

BS (4 Yea ars) for Aff filiated Colleges

Code ENG-40 04 Ye ear 4 Aims:

Subject Title t So outh Asian Literature Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester VII V

liarize the students with South Asian writing and the reg s h gional flavo that it adds to or To famil literature in English es h. Drama • G Girish Karnad d Fiction • K Kamila Sham msi • B Bapsi Sidhwa a • M Mohsin Hami id • A Arundhati Ro oy Poetry • • • • • Taufiq Rafat T Zulfiqar Ghose Z Nesim Ezekie N el Maki M Kureshi i Sujata Bhatt Na Mandala aag a Burnt S Shadows Ice Can Man ndy The Re eluctant Fund damentalist The Go of Small T od Things The Sto Chat, Flo Wedding one ood g Attack on Sialkot, A Dragonfly in the Sun k y Goodby Party for Ms Pushpa ye The Fa Thing, Chr ar ristmas Lette to My Sist er ter A Diffe erent History Genealogy y, y

mended Read dings: Recomm 1. Singh, B. P.1998. The Sta ate,The Arts and Beyond Delhi:Oxfo Universi Press d. ford ity Mirza, Shafqa Tanveer. 1992. Resist at tance Theme in Punjabi Literature. Lahore:San es i ng-e2. M meel. m 3. E William Hanaway.Stu Ed. H udies in Pak kistani Popul Culture. Lahore: Lok Virsa lar k Publishing ho ouse. Ed. vy.2002. Ind dian Literary Criticism T y Theory and I Interpretatio Hydrabad on. d 4. E G. N. Dev Press.: Orient Longman. t Note: T recomm The mended read dings are op ptional and are provide to facilita the aims and ed ate s objective of the syl es llabus. They are not to be taken as text books y s s.

BS (4 Year rs) for Affil liated Colle eges

Code ENG-40 05 Ye ear 4 Aims: •

Subject Title t Research Me R ethodology Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester VII V

To T enable stu udents to con nduct their o own short re esearch relat to langua and liter ted age rature to familiariz them with techniqu and me o ze ues ethods of s selecting top pics, develo oping qu uestions, col llecting and analyzing data and writi a dissertation. ing

Contents s: • • • • • • • In ntroduction: Qualitative and Quantitative Resea e arch Paradigm ms Id dentifying an Defining a Research P nd Problem Ethical consid E derations Sampling Tec chniques Tools for Dat Collection Questionn T ta n: naires, Interv views, Obser rvations & D Documents Data D analysis and Interpretation s Some Aspect of the Rese ts earch Repor rt a. Revie of literatu ew ure b. Transcription and Transliterat d tion c. Refere encing and C Citation

Recomm mended Read dings: 1. Grix, Jonathan. Palgrave Stu Skills: T Founda , P udy The ations of Res search. Palg grave-Macm millan: Houn ndmills, 2004 4. 2. Brow Dean. 2004. Doing S wn, Second Langu uage Resear Oxford: OUP. rch. 3. Cresw well, J. W. (2007). Qu ualitative in nquiry and r research de esign: Choosing among five g nd appro oaches (2 ed.). Thousa Oaks: Sa Publicati e and age ions. 4. RoBA A/BSon, C. (2002). Real world resea ( l arch (2nd ed. Malden, M Blackw Publishe .). MA: well ers 5. Scholfield, P. Qu ualitative and Quantitativ Research d ve h. erman, David Ed. 1998. Qualitative Research: Theory, Me d. e ethod and P Practice. Lon ndon: 6. Silve Sage. . 7. Silve erman, David Ed. 2002 Interpretin Qualitati Data: T d. 2. ng ive Text, Context and Talk. Lond don: Sage. The s he contents ma be acquir from sources other ay red r Note: T concepts listed in th syllabus c th those re han ecommende ed.

BS (4 Years) for Affi iliated Colleges

Code ENG-40 06 Ye ear 4

Subject Title t Continental L C Literature Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester VI III

Aims: The aim is to encou urage the readers to dis scover the d dominant dra amaturgical traditions in the n history o Western drama and pe of d erformance and to explo how mo ore odernist expe eriments wit the th constitue elements of plot, cha ent aracterization, language, setting, mo ovement, or theme chall lenge these trad ditions. Contents s: • August Strindb berg
• Lu uigi Pirandello o

Mi Julie iss
Six Characters in n Search of an n Author

• • • • • • • •

Gunter Grass G Hermann Hes H sse Bertolt Brech B ht Franz Kafka Arthur Rimba A aud Sartre Sa Jean Je Genet Chekhov C

Tin Drum n The Poet. Mo other Courag ge Me etamorphosi is Son From the Highest Tower, Golden Age and Et ng e n ternity Nausea N The T Balcony Ward No 13 W

mended Read dings: Recomm 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Mo odern critical views and i l interpretation, eds.Harol Bloom, 19 ld 980s Bis shop, Thoma Pirandell and the Fr as. lo rench Theatr New Yor 1961 re. rk: Cam mpbell, George A. Strind dberg. New York: 1933 Cla Barrett H. Ed. Europ ark, H pean Theorie of the Dra es ama. New Y York: Crown, 1947 , Gas ssner, John. Form and Id in Mode Theatre. New York: 1954 dea ern Gra Ronald. Bertolt Brecht. New Yor 1961 ay, B rk: Kit tchin, L. Mid d-Century Dr rama. Londo 1960 (Fo Osborne) on: or Kri itzer, Amelia Howe. The Plays of C a e Caryl Churc chill: Theatre of Empow e werment. Lon ndon: Ma acmillan, 199 91. Lan Richard. Ed. Beckett and Philoso ne, ophy, Palgrav Macmilla 2002. ve an, Lum mley, Fredrik. Trends in 20th Centur Drama. Fa n ry airlawn: 195 revised, 1 56; 1960 Nor rtham, John. IBA/BSen’s Dramatic M . s Method. Lon ndon: 1953 Pro onko, Lenard Cabell. The World of J d e Jean Anouilh Berkeley: 1951 h. Sco M. Ed. The Birthday Party, The Caretaker, The Homeco ott, T y oming: A Ca asebook. Lon ndon: Ma acmillan, 198 86.

14.

Artaud, Antonin. The Theatre and Its Double. Trans: Mary Caroline Richards. New York: 1958 15. Garten, H. F. Modern German Drama. Fairlawn: 1959 16. Chothia, Jean. English Drama of the Early Modern Period: 1890-1940. New York: Longman, 1996. Note: The recommended readings are optional and are provided to facilitate the aims and objectives of the syllabus. They are not to be taken as text books.

BS (4 Year rs) for Affil liated Colle eges

Code ENG-40 07 Ye ear

Subject Title t Pakistani L P Literature Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester VI III

Aims: rging traditio of writing in English and owing to its coloni history a great on g h ial Pakistan has an emer deal of it writing ori ts iginally. It is appropriate to study an respond to this literar heritage. After s e nd o ry studying the course students will be introduc to literatu from the region. They will be ab to s l ced ure e ble appreciat the Pakistani literary e te experience a the impa of cultura exchange. and act al Contents s: Novels a Short Stories and • • • Poetry • • • • • • Allama M. Iq A qbal Aamir Hussai A in Tahira Naqvi T Daud Kamal D Adrian A Hus A ssain Shadab Zeest Hashmi t Ha awk; Cordob Slave Me ba; entality; Ga abriel and Sa atan Sw Rice weet At of Roses ttar s Re eproductions s Ark A Ji innah’s Type ewriter & Fa atima Jinnah h Enters Her Br E rother’s Stud dy Ahmed Ali A Tariq Rehman T n Sara Suleri Tw wilight in De ehli Th Professor he Me eatless Days

Recomm mended Read dings: 1. Afzal l-Khan, Faw wzia. Cultura Imperialis and the Indo-English: Genre an ideology in R. al sm nd K. N Narayan, An nita Desai, K Kamla Das and Mark s kandaya. Pennsylvania State Unive ersity Press s,1993 2. Hash hmi, Alamgir Kamal D r. Daud’s Entry in Encycl ry lopaedia of P Post-Coloni Literatur in ial res Engli Vol 1. Ed Benson E.& Connolly L W. Lond ish. E y, don: Routled 1994 dge,

3. Khawaja Waqas A, Morning in the Wilderness: Reading in Pakistani Literature. Sang-eMeel Publications, Lahore 4. Rahman, Tariq A, History of Pakistani Literature in English. Vanguard Press (Pvt) Ltd, Lahore 1991 5. Said Edward W, Culture and Imperialism, Vintage London 1993. 6. Underhill, Evelyn. 2007.The Essentials of Mysticism. Oxford: Oxford Oneworld. 7. Ernst, Carl W.1997. The Shambhala Guide to Sufism.Delhi:India. 8. Poems From Iqbal Tras. V.J. Kieranan OUP, 1995. Note: The recommended readings are optional and are provided to facilitate the aims and objectives of the syllabus. They are not to be taken as text books.

BS (4 Y Years) for A Affiliated C Colleges

Code ENG-40 08 Ye ear 4 Aims:

Subject Title t Teaching of L T Literature Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 3

Semester VI III

practise wha they have learned in L at Linguistics & Literature i the in The aim is to enable students to p earlier se emesters. In this course students will be guided to apply th knowled d heir dge. They w be will guided on how to pla lessons an rooms usi techniqu of classro n an nd ing ues oom dynami The obje ics. ective is to prod duce effectiv teachers o English lit ve of terature. Contents s: • C Context of tea aching-learn ning of Engli in Pakist ish tan Schoo level ol Highe Education er n • Lesson Plann L ning Makin and using Lesson Pla for teachi Listening Speaking, Reading an ng g ans ing g, , nd Writin Skills. Al for Gram ng lso mmar and Vo ocabulary. Classroom Ob C bservation The im mportance of classroom observation n Obser rvation of En nglish Langu uage/Literatu Classroo ure oms/Peer Observation Classroom Dy C ynamics Roles of Teachers and Learne s ers Classr room Interac ction Teach hing the Who Class ole Pair-W Work Group p-Work Microteachin M ng Studen will teac their peer a topic of their choic from the lessons that they nts ch rs f ce t have already planned with sup a pport from th tutor/peer he rs. Reflective Te R eaching Maint taining a refl lective journ peer observation, etc for continu nal, c. uous profess sional develo opment.









Recommended Readings: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Allwright, Dick. 1988. OBA/BServation in the Language Classroom. London: Longman. Crooke, G. 200). Practicum in TESOL. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Hadfield, Jill. 1992. 2000. Classroom Dynamics. Oxford: O UP. Hedge, T. 2004. Teaching and Learning in the Language Classroom. Oxford: OUP. Memon, R. & Badger, R. (2007) A Purposeful Change? Changing the teaching of reading in a regional university in Pakistan System vol. 35: 551-565. Shamim, F. and Tribble, C. (2005). Current Provisions for Teaching and Learning of English in Higher education Institutions in Pakistan. Research Report for the National Committee on English, Higher Education Commission, Islamabad, Pakistan. Shamim, F., Negash, N, Chuku, C., & Demewoz, N. (2007). Maximizing learning in large classes. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: The British Council. Wright, Tony. 1987. Roles of Teachers and Learners. Oxford.

7. 8.

Note: The concepts listed in the syllabus contents may be acquired from sources other than those recommended.

BS (4 Year rs) for Affi iliated Coll leges

Code ENG-40 09 Ye ear 4

Subject Title t Research Project Discipline D English E

Cr. Hrs 6

Semester

Thesis (e equivalent to two courses 6 credit ho spread over semesters VII &VI o sours III). Students will be requ uired to unde ertake a smal ll-scale inve estigation on a topic of in ndividual int terest in their a of specia area alization. Th aim of this componen is to encou he nt urage the stud dents to • • • • Develop the ability to col D a llect, analyze and interpr data e ret Present their findings in a coheren and welln nt -organized r research pap and to a per avoid plagerism. Write an abst W tract presenti a critical summary o the paper c ing l of comprising 1 – 200 w 150 words Document the sources u D eir using MLA f format for in ntext citation and works cited list n

They wil submit the first draft of the researc paper at th end of sem ll ch he mester VII. Each stud will be provided ind dent dividual sup pervision and guidance in the proposed research that d n he or she is conductin e ng.

Similar Documents

Free Essay

Syllabus

... |4000 | * Sessional Marks in each theory paper will be awarded by the concerned teacher on the basis of marks obtained in one class test (of 10 Marks and 90 minutes duration) and evaluation of assignments (of 10 Marks). Note: Size of Groups for all practical and viva-voce examinations should not be more than thirty. MCA-101 Computer Fundamentals and Problem Solving Using C Maximum marks: 100 External: 80 Time: 3 hours Internal: 20 Note: Examiner will be required to set NINE questions in all. Question Number 1 will consist of total 8 parts (objective type/short-answer type questions) covering the entire syllabus and will carry 24 marks. In addition to the compulsory question there will be four units i.e. Unit-I to Unit-IV. Examiner will set two questions from each Unit of the syllabus and each question will carry 14 marks. Student will be required to attempt FIVE questions in all. Question Number 1 will be compulsory. In addition to compulsory question, student will have to attempt four more questions selecting one question from each Unit. UNIT-I Computer Fundamentals: Definition, Block Diagram along with Computer components, characteristics & classification of computers, hardware & software, types of software, firmware. Planning the Computer Program: Concept of problem solving, Problem definition, Program design, Debugging, Types of errors in programming, Documentation. Techniques of Problem Solving: Flowcharting, decision......

Words: 13848 - Pages: 56

Premium Essay

Syllabus

... | | | | | | | |. | | | |The instructor reserves the right to make changes as needed to the course syllabus Bottom of Form | Please note: This class may occasionally deviate from the course outline above. The instructor reserves the right to make changes as needed to the course syllabus. ----------------------- Professor Ramenofsky Office Phone: 312-915-7051 E-mail: Srameno@luc.edu Maguire Office: Room 388 1 East Pearson, Chicago, IL 60611 Office Hours, including By Appointment: Monday 4-6 PM; Catalog Description The fundamentals of managerial statistics are presented. Topics may include descriptive statistics, random variables, probability distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation analysis. Statistical software is used to assist in the analysis of these problems. Course Overview The course is designed to show managers and future......

Words: 1377 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Syllabus

...|[pic] |Course Syllabus | | |College of Humanities | | |HUM/130 Version 6 | | |Religions of the World | Copyright © 2009, 2007, 2006 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved. Course Description This course studies the major religions of the world. Topical areas include Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Indigenous Cultures, Islam, Judaism, and Taoism. Students will be objectively studying the origins and major figures and......

Words: 2195 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Syllabus

...Official TCC Course Syllabus Discipline Prefix: ITD Credit Hours: 4 Contact Hours: 4 Course Number: 260 Course Section: H01B Lecture Hours: 4 Studio Hours: Clinical Hours: Semester: Fall 2014 Lab Hours: Course Title: Database Modeling and Design Meeting Days/Time/Location: Wednesday, 8:00 pm – 9:40 pm, ATC – H207 Instructor Information Name: John Clary Office Location: ATC – H207 Office Hours: Immediately before and after class, other times and locations by appointment Contact Information: jclary@tcc.edu Blackboard site: http://learn.vccs.edu Course Information Course Description Introduces life cycle application development methodologies in a systematic approach to developing relational databases and designing applications. Presents content introducing functional and business process modeling, using modeling information to produce application designs, analyzing data requirements as entities, attributes, and relationships and map an entity relationship diagram to an initial database design. Identifies the available automated development tools and software to perform practical applications of these concepts. Prerequisites and/or Co-requisites ITD132 – Structured Query Language General Education Core Competencies Supported by this Course • Critical Thinking A competent critical thinker evaluates evidence carefully and applies reasoning to decide what to believe and how to act. Page 1 of 8 • Information Literacy A person who is competent in......

Words: 2570 - Pages: 11

Premium Essay

Syllabus

...TROY UNIVERSITY eTROY IS2241 Section XTIC Computer Concepts and Applications COURSE SYLLABUS Term 1, 2014 August 11 – October 12 INSTRUCTOR INFORMATION: onn Dr. Joe Teng Troy University Chair, Information Systems and Quantitative Methods Office Location/Hours: Mailing Address: via email; within 24 238B Bibb Graves Hall Troy University Troy, Alabama 36082 Office: 334-670-3195 office jteng@troy.edu Dr. Joe Teng Troy University Chair, Information Systems and Quantitative Methods 334-670-3195 jteng@troy.edu Telephone: E-Mail: Troy Department Chair: The syllabus for this class includes the TROY Department Chair contact information for Dr. Teng. This is provided in the event you cannot resolve a situation with me, your instructor. PLEASE do not contact (e-mail or phone) Dr. Teng with a question, problem, or concern unless you have first contacted me and you have not received a response from me within 24-48 hours, or if you do not agree with my response. Thank you for your help in this matter. Students: Please place IS 2241 XTIC in the subject line of any emails sent to me. NOTE: For a course syllabus posted prior to the beginning of the term, the instructor reserves the right to make minor changes prior to or during the term. The instructor will notify students, via email or Blackboard announcement, when changes are made in the requirements and/or grading of the course. INSTRUCTOR EDUCATION: Ph.D., Management Information Systems. The University of Memphis, Memphis,......

Words: 5096 - Pages: 21

Premium Essay

Syllabus

...[pic] College of Arts & Sciences Course Syllabus GEN/200 | Version r1 Foundations for General Education and Professional Success Please print a copy of this syllabus for handy reference. Whenever there is a question about what assignments are due, please remember this syllabus is considered the ruling document. Copyright Copyright ©2011 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved. University of Phoenix© is a registered trademark of Apollo Group, Inc. in the United States and/or other countries. Microsoft©, Windows©, and Windows NT© are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. All other company and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective companies. Use of these marks is not intended to imply endorsement, sponsorship, or affiliation. Edited in accordance with University of Phoenix© editorial standards and practices. Please print a copy of this syllabus for handy reference. Whenever there is a question about what assignments are due, please remember this syllabus is considered the ruling document. GENERAL COURSE INFORMATION COURSE NUMBER: GEN200 COURSE TITLE: Foundations for General Education and Professional Success COURSE START DATE: 05/17/2011 COURSE END DATE: 06/20/2011 REQUIRED READING: Students are required to read all materials......

Words: 1978 - Pages: 8

Free Essay

Syllabus

...Perspective When you read a business publication website such as the Wall Street Journal, Fortune, Business Week, or even a general publication such as the Washington Post or the New York Times, you will see a large number of stories directly related to the use of information systems in business and government. Business people get excited because Information Systems (IS) have the power to create and restructure industries, empower individuals and firms, and dramatically reduce costs. Business people get scared because they know, when poorly implemented, IS can squander shareholder wealth, taxpayer money, and destroy firms and careers. Every manager in business, non-profits and government has to pay attention to the impact on their BMGT301(Syllabus(McCue(2014 Fall for 0601, 0701 v4.docx Page 1 of 12 business and career of information systems, information technology, and the innovations in that technology. Finance majors will fund investments in technology. They will lend to technology firms, will buy and sell technology stocks, and will try to understand how shifts in technology will affect investments. Investment bankers will finance startup technology companies and need to understand topics such as Cloud, Software Defined Networks, and Digital Presence. Marketing majors will use information systems to figure out what customers want and how to sell it to them. New roles such as the Chief Marketing Officer and Chief Digital Officer will have success defined by how......

Words: 4524 - Pages: 19

Premium Essay

Syllabus

... 11th Grade Afro-Asian Literature Course Syllabus | Educ 508 – Principles of College Teaching | Submitted by:Jonathan Jay F. BaniagaSubmitted to: Dr. Wilhelmina Q. Tomas | LONDON.MANILA.TOKYO.SEOUL Tomoeda Academy Tomoeda Academy Julia Vargas Avenue, Ortigas, Pasig City 11th Grade World Literature Course Syllabus Mr. Jonathan Jay F. Baniaga 2015- 2016 I.Subject Code: English 101a II. Subject Description: Afro-Asian Literature III. Credit Units: 3 IV. Pre-Requisite: none V. Duration: 18 weeks (54 hours) – 1 meeting per week (3 hours per class session) VI. Course Overview: Afro-Asian Literature is a survey course in reading and writing. The text focuses on selected works of Afro -Asian literature ranging from 3,000 B.C. to the present and is augmented with a wide array of novels and other supplemental materials. All literary genres will be covered. Students are expected to critically read all genres of literature and write cohesive, clear, and well-structured analyses/critiques about what they have read. Students will write a variety of rhetorical modes and for a variety of purposes including narration, information, and persuasion. Students’ papers will reflect a sophisticated level of original analysis and include references to the read text or to outside sources where appropriate. VII. Course......

Words: 1741 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Syllabus

...|[pic] |Syllabus | | |School of Business | | |MGT/449 Version 7 | | |Quality Management and Productivity | Copyright © 2010, 2009, 2005, 2004, 2003 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved. Course Description This course examines the concepts of continuous improvement and quality management, viewing quality as a systematic process that improves customer satisfaction. The course covers methodologies that will aid managers in assuring that the organization's quality system is effectively meeting the organization's continuous improvement goals. Policies Faculty and students/learners will be held responsible for understanding and adhering to all policies contained within the following two documents: • University policies: You must be logged into the student website to view this document. • Instructor policies: This document is posted in the Course Materials forum. University policies are subject to change. Be sure to read the policies at the beginning of each class...

Words: 1303 - Pages: 6

Premium Essay

Syllabus

...Syllabus Page 1 of 34 Draft: Please download latest upon course launch. Syllabus This is a single, concatenated file, suitable for printing or saving as a PDF for offline viewing. Please note that some animations or images may not work. Course Description This module (allpages.htm) is also available as a concatenated page, suitable for printing or saving as a PDF for offline viewing. MET CS669 Database Design and Implementation for Business This course uses the latest database tools and techniques for persistent data and object-modeling and management. Students gain extensive hands-on experience with exercises and a term project using Oracle, SQL Server, and other leading database management systems. Students learn to model persistent data using the standard Entity-Relationship model (ERM) and how to diagram those models using EntityRelationship Diagrams (ERDs), Extended Entity-Relationship Diagrams (EERDs), and UML diagrams. Students learn the standards-based Structured Query Language (SQL) and the extensions to the SQL standards implemented in Oracle and SQL Server. Students learn the basics of database programming, and write simple stored procedures and triggers. The Role of this Course in the MSCIS Online Curriculum This is a core course in the MSCIS online curriculum. It provides students with an understanding and experience with database technology, database design, SQL, and the roles of databases in enterprises. This course is a...

Words: 10777 - Pages: 44

Free Essay

Syllabus

...classroom while the class is in session. Such movements can be highly disruptive to the smooth conduct of a class lecture/discussion and are to be avoided. 5. It is very important that students give their undivided attention to the class discussion and material being covered while the class is in session, student teams are making presentations, and when in-class experiential exercises and quizzes are being held. In-class small talk is to be absolutely avoided. Any issue of concern or opinion is to be brought up for class discussion or separately communicated to the instructor outside of the class. Not adhering to the above rules will be considered as a serious violation of the MGT 701 Course Learning Contract (as expressed through this syllabus) and will invite severe penalties, including award of a failing grade in the overall course. 7.2 Conflict Redressing Policy Because a substantial part of the student’s work for this class will be done within respective student learning teams, a conflict redressing policy is necessary to ensure you have a productive and effective team. Any team that has a non-productive member should advise that member immediately and work to help the member’s inclusion and productivity. If a team continues to have problems with a member, notify the instructor by e-mail, copying the offending party and all group members. If a majority of the team agrees that remedial measures have been unsuccessful, that member may be suspended from that......

Words: 3833 - Pages: 16

Premium Essay

Syllabus

...PSYCHOLOGY 1301 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY Fall 2015 Syllabus Section: 001 Time: T & TH 12:30-1:45 Room: LLCT2 Instructor: Office: Office Hours: Tuesday & Thursday from 8:30-9:20 & 10:50-12:00 & Wednesday from 1:00-2:00. E-Mail: Text: The Science of Psychology: An Appreciative View 3rd ed. By Laura A. King Course Description and Objectives: This course is designed to teach the student basic principles that effect the behavior of animals and humans. The wide varieties of topics found in psychology today are introduced and the underlying theories discussed. The course is meant to be a foundation course for those planning to major in psychology as well as an interesting elective for non-majors. This class also completes a general education requirement. Course Objectives: to help you expand your abilities and knowledge in the following broad areas as they pertain to psychology: the process of inquiry, critical reasoning, major concepts and methodologies, current developments within psychology, applications of psychological principles to the real world, comprehension and understanding of psychological theory and research design, and respect for the commonality and diversity of human experience. Learning Objectives: By the end of this course, students should have a basic understanding of: the dynamics of psychological research, how the science of psychology has come to be a field of its own, the importance and contribution of the......

Words: 2186 - Pages: 9

Premium Essay

Syllabus

...tools necessary for engineering practice l. knowledge and understanding of engineering and management principles as a member and leader in a team, to manage projects in multidisciplinary environments Section 3 COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES (CLO) 1. Be familiarized and discuss the operation of different electrical instruments used in AC circuits 2. Understand the behavior of resistors, inductors and capacitors in AC system, including power 3. Understand the frequency response of RL and RC in AC circuits 4. Understand the operation of the balanced three-phase system a b c d D D D D D D D PROGRAM OUTCOMES e f g h i j k l E D E D E D E D D E D E D D E D E I – introduce, D – demonstrate, E – enhance EEC201L | COURSE SYLLABUS | 1 Section 4 PREREQUISITE CO-REQUISITE COURSE DESCRIPTION COURSE OBJECTIVES EEC103/EEC101L Circuits 1 (Lecture and Laboratory) EEC203 Circuits 2 (Lecture) This course covers activities that will enhance students’ learning in AC circuit analysis; a laboratory course to accompany Circuits 1 (Lecture). By the end of this course, the students will be able to be familiarized with the different electrical equipment and apparatus provided in the course; understand hands-on learning activities and technical skills in Circuits 2; and to develop communication skills and teamwork in performing the experiments. Section 5 WEEK TEACHING AND LEARNING ACTIVITIES (TLA) TOPICS ASSESSMENT TASK (AT) CLO   1 2 Class orientation; Review......

Words: 1551 - Pages: 7

Premium Essay

Syllabus

...Orientation Syllabus UNIV/100 Version 9 1 Orientation Syllabus UNIV/100 Version 9 University of Phoenix Orientation Workshop Copyright © 2011, 2010, 2009 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved. Course Description This 3-week orientation workshop helps students be successful in college. Students practice using the Online Learning System (OLS), learn techniques to be successful in college, and identify useful university services and resources. Policies In every course at the University of Phoenix, faculty and students will be held responsible for understanding and adhering to all policies contained within the following two documents: • • University policies: You must be logged into the student website to view this document. Instructor policies: This document may be accessed from the student website. University policies are subject to change. Be sure to read the policies at the beginning of each class. Policies may be slightly different depending on the modality in which you attend class. If you have recently changed modalities, read the policies governing your current class modality. Course Materials All electronic materials are available on the student website at https://ecampus.phoenix.edu. Adobe® Flash® download: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/ Adobe® Shockwave® download: http://get.adobe.com/shockwave/ Week One: Online Learning System (OLS) Details Objectives Nongraded Activities and Preparation UNIV/100 Course Page Overview 1.1 Use the Online......

Words: 3920 - Pages: 16

Premium Essay

Syllabus

...Course Syllabus RES/341 RESEARCH AND EVALUATION I Welcome to RES/341, let’s do everything we can to ensure that the next six weeks will be an enlightening and enjoyable learning experience for all of us. Please print a copy of this syllabus for handy reference. Whenever there is a question about what assignments are due, this syllabus is considered the ruling document. Classroom Management Policies     Breaks in the On Campus classes will be when deemed necessary. Please leave the classroom clean. Phones: Turn them off or keep them in silent mode. ***DO NOT answer the phone in the classroom. Laptop/notebook computers: If I determine the use of a laptop during class time is disruptive behavior that hinders or interferes with the educational process, you will be required to turn it off. Technical Support Technical Support is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Call 1-877-832-4867, or use the e-mail support form. For answers to the most common issues, go to “Knowledge Base” by clicking Help, found at the top of every student Web site. Course Description See eCampus. Course Topics & Objectives See eCampus. Course Materials See eCampus. Participation In an intensive, collaborative learning environment such as that of University of Phoenix, class attendance is perhaps the most obvious and objective starting point as a measure for participation. If you are not in attendance, you miss out on many opportunities for learning. Consequently, if......

Words: 3437 - Pages: 14