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Television Adverse Effects in Human Living

In: Business and Management

Submitted By ardyanswelly
Words 408
Pages 2
Television Adverse Effects in Human Living Technology had grown for thousands years for one simple porpose, it is to create convenience to human. From the found of fire in to the use of solar radiation, from the use of traditional horse-drawn carriage in to the spacecraft propulsion, from the found of simple model of aircraft in to jet. All of these were created to enhance the living conditions of human. Unfortunately, the current use of technology has been abuse anyway. One of the abuses closest to ordinary life are the negative effects of excessive use of television. Firstly innovated by John Logie Baird, in 1884 through an electromechanical television system that uses a Nipkow disc. Through innovation and development, television has come to the development of a high quality technology, unfortunately this advantage should be abused and give adverse effects to humans. Watching TV has become an activity that is so common, unfortunately this also be the cause of obesity in children. Since most kids spent about 3 hours in front of the TV. Research conducted in an elementary schools in California showed that 20% of children who watch TV tend to eat more food than the others. Children consume at least a quarter of the food is more when compared with those who did not watch TV. No wonder it is that eventually triggers obesity in children. Also known as degradation capability called Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or attention deficit disorder is a concentration and impulsiveness that are not age-appropriate. Beside that, watch TV too often can significantly reduce social interaction. It can reduce the ability of an object in building a social interaction that would lead to social phobia. Fundamentally all inventions, innovations and development are present, in the form of technologies, aimed at increasing comfort even help human meet the primary needs of them....

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