Tell Me About Blood

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Unit 1 Case Study 1 Tell Me about Blood Paige Keegan March 24, 2016 ITT-Technical Institute

1. How does the volume of blood in your body compare to the volume of fluid in a two-liter bottle of soda? In the average-sized male the blood volume is 5-6 liters and 4-5 in the adult female. (Pg. 616) 2. What is the significance of a lower-than-normal hematocrit? A higher-than-normal hematocrit? Lower-than-normal hematocrit indicates anemia. Higher-than-normal hematocrit indicates polycythemia. (Pg. 619) 3. How is the development of lymphocytes unique when compared to the development of the other formed elements? B Lymphocytes develop in red bone marrow, T lymphocytes develop in red bone marrow and mature in the thymus; the other formed elements develop in red bone marrow. 4. How are red blood cells able to squeeze through capillaries that are smaller in diameter than they are? The cell membrane is strong and flexible, so it can deform without rupturing the cell. (pg. 622) 5. Why do red blood cells live for only about 120 days? Because of the wear and tear their plasma membranes undergo as they squeeze through blood capillaries. (pg. 622) 6. What is erythropoiesis? What factors speed up and slow down erythropoiesis? Erythropoiesis is production of RBCs. Erythropoiesis is speeded up when oxygen delivery to the kidneys falls and slows down when there is sufficient oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood. (pg. 624) 7. What would happen if a person with type B blood were given a transfusion of type O Blood? Nothing would happen, because type O blood is a compatible blood donor for type B blood. (pg. 627) 8. During an anatomy and physiology exam you are asked to view white blood cells in prepared slides of standard human blood smears. Based on the observations below, what is the name of this WBC? A. WBC has a round nucleus…...

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