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The 26th Amendment

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26th Amendment
The 26th Amendment was proposed on March 23rd, 1971 and ratified on July 1st of the same year. The 26th Amendment would be the quickest to be ratified in United States history. So many people wanted this law to happen and it did. The saying was “Old enough to fight, then old enough to vote.” This new amendment had people across the nation pondering. This amendment was a remarkable new amendment. Young people could now vote and get involve in there new political leaders. Before this new amendment the law was that you couldn’t vote unless you were at least 21 so until that age, teenagers didn’t care about who was running their country at all until they were of that legal age. The 26th Amendment changed the whole idea of the adulthood of eighteen year olds in America’s eyes forever. Student activist during the Vietnam War, were outraged that young men and women could die in a war and fight for their country but weren’t able to vote. They felt like this was unfair and it took away their rights as citizens. Making the 26th Amendment as a law made them feel like they made a difference. "No taxation without representation” was also a big deal because taxes were still getting pulled out of young teenager’s paychecks. How is that fair if they couldn’t even vote on this but still had to get chunks of money taken out of their paychecks? In some states, including Texas, has changes the adult age to seventeen years old, declaring that if you disobey a law than you will be acted upon as an adult. In some cases depending on how bad the situation is you can be as young as fourteen years old and go to the big boy jail. If you can be seventeen years old and go to jail or possibly prison, why shouldn’t you be able to vote? In some states you can get married at the age sixteen as long as you have parent consent. If you can get married I’m sure you should have the...

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