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The Benefits Of Sustainable Agriculture

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Sustainable and productive farming is a complex, interactive process that is dependent on ecological, livestock, social and water resources as well as economic factors. The aim of sustainable agriculture is to meet society’s needs in the present without compromising the ability of upcoming generations to meet their own needs; the stewardship of both human and natural resources is of major standing. Farmers of sustainable agriculture strive to integrate objectives into their work: a healthy environment, economic profitability, animal well-being and social equity. Stakeholders of each farm (all people involved- suppliers/distributors, retailers, consumers etc.) play a huge role in warranting a viable (E.Ilari-Antoine et al 2014) and sustainable …show more content…
The farmer and manager, John Morris, has reportedly said that Mariendahl is sustainable as a whole. This paper investigates the sustainability and productivity of Mariendahl, but more specifically the pig portion of the farm. Moreover, it provides an insight into the five basic pillars (E.Ilari-Antoine et al 2014) (ecological, livestock, social and water resources as well as economic factors) of the farm. Throughout the paper, there will be usage of a score card where certain elements are evaluated on a count of: (1) Bad; (2) Average; (3) Good; (4) Excellent. Working through the five (5) abovementioned pillars, this paper will provide information and a conclusion on whether Mariendahl is compromising the ability of the future of the farm by meeting their own needs in the …show more content…
The farm has received an average rainfall of 625 mm a year, but not as much during a drought. The manager/ farmer always produces roughage on his pastures – Oats and Lucerne. Grain, Molasses and protein is bought and the farmer mixes these 5 components to provide feed for some of his animals. Mariendahl turns waste (faeces) into fertiliser (manure) and then uses the manure on their own crops (oats and Lucerne) to try enrich the soil and boost the fertility, thus saving costs of buying fertiliser and utilising the waste that would have accumulated on the

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