The Conquests and Legacy of Alexander the Great

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"DESCRIBE THE CONQUESTS OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT AND ANALYZE THE LEGACY OF HIS EMPIRE"
In just twelve years, Alexander the Great conquered vast territories and dominated lands from west of the Nile to east of the Indus. He brought the Persian Empire, Egypt and much of the Middle East under his control. Alexander was the son of Phillip II of Macedonia and Olympia’s. His father knew that he would succeed him so Phillip II prepared Alexander for a military and political future. He was very well educated by the Greek Philosopher, Aristotle. Aristotle taught Alexander not just the basics but opened his interest to science, medicine and philosophy. After Phillip II was assassinated, Alexander became king of Macedonia at the age of twenty. As stated Alexander was groomed from an early age and was given control of the cavalry at the important battle of Chaeronea. He secured Macedonia’s frontlines, put down the Greek rebellion, then set his eyes on the rest of the world.
He began his campaign (entered Asia Minor) with 37,000 men of which 5,000 were cavalry and had his first confrontation and victory against the Persian Empire at a battle at the Granicus River which almost cost him his life. By the following spring, 334/335, the western half of Asia Minor was controlled by Alexander. At the Battle of Issus, the Persian troops outnumbered Alexander’s and his men. However, the numerical advantage the Persian’s had was cancelled because the battle was on a narrow field and resulted in another success for Macedonia. Alexander then turned south, and by the winter of 332 BCE, Alexander dominated Egypt, Palestine and Syria. He took the title of pharaoh of Egypt and founded the first cities named after him. (Alexandria) as the Greek administrative capital of Egypt which remains one of Egypt’s and Mediterranean’s most important cities. He then moved into ancient Mesopotamia in…...

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