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The Cultural Patterns of the Native American Groups Prior to European Colonization.

In: Social Issues

Submitted By kinloch
Words 7887
Pages 32
Beverly, Rose A.

His 221 010

August 27, 2011

Morris, Erin

The cultural patterns of the Native American groups prior to European colonization.

Even though Christopher Columbus claimed to have discovered the Americas in 1492, it was already inhabited some fifteen to twenty thousand years prior. The glaciers were reduced because of global warming and this gave the nomadic hunters access to the core of the North American continent. Amazingly, this contributed to their food supply abundantly and this produced a swift population growth. More changes became evident in the environment which included a new food source such as fish, nuts and berries. These Native Americans, known as Paleo-Indians, adjusted and propelled forward. Because they were exposed to a new food source they discovered how to cultivate certain plants. At this stage, the Agriculture Revolution was born and this significantly altered the Native American culture. With a more stable food source these Indians became docile and established. This also helped in establishing stable villages and eventually led to some type of government which included elders and leaders. The Eastern Woodland Cultures did not practice agriculture first and foremost but supplemented their food chain with hunting and fishing. They had settled in the northern region along the Atlantic coast.

The Algonquian-speaking Natives resided from North Carolina to Main and spoke many different dialects depending on the region they were associated with. Furthermore, most Native American hierarchy was established in their culture through kinship. Surprisingly, many of the Native Americans were not hostile and in many instances, their differences were settled in a civilized manner in spite of past rumors.

The effects of British colonization on the Native Americans.…...

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